Frederick, Prince of Wales

FrederickPrince of WalesPrince FrederickFrederick LouisPrince Frederick LouisThe Prince Frederick, Prince of Walesthe Prince of WalesFrederick LewisFrederick Louis, Prince of WalesDuke of Edinburgh
Frederick, Prince of Wales, KG (Frederick Lewis; 1 February 1707 – 31 March 1751), was heir apparent to the British throne from 1727 until his death from a lung injury at the age of 44 in 1751.wikipedia
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George II of Great Britain

George IIKing George IIPrince of Wales
He was the eldest but estranged son of King George II and Caroline of Ansbach, and the father of King George III. One frame made for his namesake cousin in 1748, Frederick the Great of Prussia, was especially lavish and represented the esteem in which the Prince held his cousin, suggesting the Prince identified with Frederick the Great's style of enlightened rule, over that of his own father George II.
He had a difficult relationship with his eldest son, Frederick, who supported the parliamentary opposition.

George III of the United Kingdom

George IIIKing George IIIKing George
He was the eldest but estranged son of King George II and Caroline of Ansbach, and the father of King George III.
He was the grandson of King George II, and the eldest son of Frederick, Prince of Wales, and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha.

Caroline of Ansbach

Queen CarolineCarolinePrincess of Wales
He was the eldest but estranged son of King George II and Caroline of Ansbach, and the father of King George III.
Her eldest son, Frederick, became Prince of Wales.

Opera of the Nobility

Frederick and his group supported the Opera of the Nobility in Lincoln's Inn Fields as a rival to Handel's royally sponsored opera at the King's Theatre in the Haymarket.
The Opera of the Nobility (or Nobility Opera ) was an opera company set up and funded in 1733 by a group of nobles (under Frederick, Prince of Wales) opposed to George II of England, in order to rival the (Second) Royal Academy of Music company under Handel (backed by George II and his queen).

Fredericksburg, Virginia

FredericksburgFredericksburg CityFredericksburg, VA
1728 also saw the foundation of Fredericksburg, Virginia, which was named after him – his other namesakes are Prince Frederick, Maryland (1722), Fort Frederick, Maine (1729–30), Fort Frederick, South Carolina (1730–34), Fort Frederick, New York (completed 1735) and Fort Frederica, Georgia (founded 1736), while Fort Frederick, Maryland, Point Frederick, Ontario, Fort Frederick, Ontario and Fort Frederick, New Brunswick were also named after him posthumously.
Named for Frederick, Prince of Wales, son of King George II, the colonial town named its streets after the members of the royal family.

Prince Frederick, Maryland

Prince Frederick
1728 also saw the foundation of Fredericksburg, Virginia, which was named after him – his other namesakes are Prince Frederick, Maryland (1722), Fort Frederick, Maine (1729–30), Fort Frederick, South Carolina (1730–34), Fort Frederick, New York (completed 1735) and Fort Frederica, Georgia (founded 1736), while Fort Frederick, Maryland, Point Frederick, Ontario, Fort Frederick, Ontario and Fort Frederick, New Brunswick were also named after him posthumously.
The town was most likely named for George II's son Frederick, who was Prince of Wales during the time of the town's original conception.

Fort Frederica National Monument

Fort FredericaFrederica
1728 also saw the foundation of Fredericksburg, Virginia, which was named after him – his other namesakes are Prince Frederick, Maryland (1722), Fort Frederick, Maine (1729–30), Fort Frederick, South Carolina (1730–34), Fort Frederick, New York (completed 1735) and Fort Frederica, Georgia (founded 1736), while Fort Frederick, Maryland, Point Frederick, Ontario, Fort Frederick, Ontario and Fort Frederick, New Brunswick were also named after him posthumously.
The town was named Frederica, after Frederick, Prince of Wales, son of King George II.

Fort Frederick (Albany)

Fort FrederickFort Albany
1728 also saw the foundation of Fredericksburg, Virginia, which was named after him – his other namesakes are Prince Frederick, Maryland (1722), Fort Frederick, Maine (1729–30), Fort Frederick, South Carolina (1730–34), Fort Frederick, New York (completed 1735) and Fort Frederica, Georgia (founded 1736), while Fort Frederick, Maryland, Point Frederick, Ontario, Fort Frederick, Ontario and Fort Frederick, New Brunswick were also named after him posthumously.
The fort was named for Frederick Louis, Prince of Wales, son of King George II.

Prince of Wales

The Prince of WalesPrincePrinces of Wales
He moved to Great Britain following the accession of his father, and was created Prince of Wales.
Following the death of Prince Arthur, the Prince of Wales, Henry VII invested his second son, the future Henry VIII, with the title—although only after it was clear that Arthur's wife, Catherine of Aragon, was not pregnant; when Frederick, Prince of Wales died while his father reigned, George II created Frederick's son George (the king's grandson and new heir apparent) Prince of Wales.

Heir apparent

heir-apparentheirs apparentheir
Frederick, Prince of Wales, KG (Frederick Lewis; 1 February 1707 – 31 March 1751), was heir apparent to the British throne from 1727 until his death from a lung injury at the age of 44 in 1751.

Rule, Britannia!

Rule BritanniaRule, BritanniaBritannia ruling the waves
A permanent result of Frederick's patronage of the arts is "Rule, Britannia!", one of the best-known British patriotic songs.
This British national air was originally included in Alfred, a masque about Alfred the Great co-written by Thomson and David Mallet and first performed at Cliveden, country home of Frederick, Prince of Wales (the eldest son of George II and father of the future George III, as well as the great-grandfather of Queen Victoria), on 1 August 1740, to commemorate the accession of George II and the third birthday of the Princess Augusta.

Fort Frederick (Kingston, Ontario)

Fort Frederick
1728 also saw the foundation of Fredericksburg, Virginia, which was named after him – his other namesakes are Prince Frederick, Maryland (1722), Fort Frederick, Maine (1729–30), Fort Frederick, South Carolina (1730–34), Fort Frederick, New York (completed 1735) and Fort Frederica, Georgia (founded 1736), while Fort Frederick, Maryland, Point Frederick, Ontario, Fort Frederick, Ontario and Fort Frederick, New Brunswick were also named after him posthumously.
The point and fort were named after Frederick, Prince of Wales.

Point Frederick (Kingston, Ontario)

Point FrederickPoint Frederick PeninsulaPoint Frederick, Kingston
1728 also saw the foundation of Fredericksburg, Virginia, which was named after him – his other namesakes are Prince Frederick, Maryland (1722), Fort Frederick, Maine (1729–30), Fort Frederick, South Carolina (1730–34), Fort Frederick, New York (completed 1735) and Fort Frederica, Georgia (founded 1736), while Fort Frederick, Maryland, Point Frederick, Ontario, Fort Frederick, Ontario and Fort Frederick, New Brunswick were also named after him posthumously.
The peninsula was named after Frederick, Prince of Wales.

Anne Vane

Hervey and Frederick also shared a mistress, Anne Vane, who had a son called FitzFrederick Vane in June 1732.
Anne Vane (died 27 March 1736), also known as "the Hon. Mrs. Vane," was a maid of honour to Caroline of Ansbach and mistress to her son Frederick, Prince of Wales.

Prince William, Duke of Cumberland

Duke of Cumberlandthe Duke of CumberlandWilliam
At court, the favourite was Frederick's younger brother, Prince William, Duke of Cumberland, to the extent that the king looked into ways of splitting his domains so that Frederick would succeed only in Britain, while Hanover would go to William.
William's elder brother Frederick, Prince of Wales, proposed dividing the king's dominions.

Ernest Augustus, Duke of York and Albany

Ernest AugustusDuke Ernest Augustus of Brunswick-Lüneburg, Bishop of OsnabrückErnest Augustus of Brunswick-Lüneburg, Duke of York and Albany
He was left in the care of his grand-uncle Ernest Augustus, Prince-Bishop of Osnabrück, and did not see his parents again for 14 years.
In this capacity, he became regent in all but name, and took on the duty of care for George's seven-year-old grandson, Frederick Lewis, the future Prince of Wales and father-to-be of George III.

Diana Russell, Duchess of Bedford

Lady Diana SpencerDiana SpencerDiana, Duchess of Bedford
Frederick also almost married Lady Diana Spencer, daughter of Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland and Lady Anne Churchill.
Diana Russell, Duchess of Bedford (née Lady Diana Spencer; 31 July 1710 – 27 September 1735), was a member of the Spencer family known for the unsuccessful attempt of marriage with Frederick, Prince of Wales.

Frederick the Great

Frederick IIFrederick II of PrussiaFrederick
One frame made for his namesake cousin in 1748, Frederick the Great of Prussia, was especially lavish and represented the esteem in which the Prince held his cousin, suggesting the Prince identified with Frederick the Great's style of enlightened rule, over that of his own father George II.
Queen Sophia Dorothea attempted to arrange Frederick and his sister Wilhelmine with Amelia and Frederick, the children of her brother, King George II of Great Britain.

Philippe Mercier

Mercier
Frederick was a lover of music who played the viola and cello; he is depicted playing a cello in a portrait by Philip Mercier of Frederick and his sisters, now part of the National Portrait Gallery collection. The list of other artists he employed—Philip Mercier, John Wootton, George Knapton and the French engraver Joseph Goupy—represents some of the principal painterly figures of the English Rococo.
He was appointed principal painter and librarian to the Prince and Princess of Wales at their independent establishment in Leicester Fields, and while he was in favour he painted various portraits of royalty, and no doubt many of the nobility and gentry.

John Wootton

Wootton
The list of other artists he employed—Philip Mercier, John Wootton, George Knapton and the French engraver Joseph Goupy—represents some of the principal painterly figures of the English Rococo.
These included figures such as George II of Great Britain, Frederick, Prince of Wales, and the Duke of Marlborough.

Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha

AugustaPrincess AugustaAugusta, Dowager Princess of Wales
Although in his youth he was undoubtedly a spendthrift and womaniser, Frederick settled down following his marriage to the sixteen-year-old Augusta of Saxe-Gotha on 27 April 1736.
Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg (30 November 1719 – 8 February 1772) was Princess of Wales by marriage to Frederick, Prince of Wales.

Cliveden

Cliveden HouseCliveden HotelCliveden-on-Thames
It was composed by the English composer Thomas Arne and written by the Scottish poet and playwright James Thomson as part of the masque Alfred which was first performed on 1 August 1740 at Cliveden, the country home of the Prince and Princess of Wales.
Orkney died in 1737, and Cliveden passed to his daughter Anne, 2nd Countess of Orkney (suo jure). She immediately leased it to Frederick, Prince of Wales (son of George II and father of George III).

Joseph Goupy

The list of other artists he employed—Philip Mercier, John Wootton, George Knapton and the French engraver Joseph Goupy—represents some of the principal painterly figures of the English Rococo.
One of his patrons was Frederick, Prince of Wales, and with his brother Francis, he was a member of the St Martin's Lane Academy, studying under his uncle Louis Goupy.

Sing Unto God/Anthem for the Wedding of Frederick, Prince of Wales

Sing unto GodSing unto God or Anthem for Wedding of Prince Frederick
Handel provided the new anthem 'Sing unto God' for the service and the wedding was also marked in London by two rival operas, Handel's Atalanta and Porpora's La festa d'Imeneo
Sing Unto God/Anthem for the Wedding of Frederick, Prince of Wales and Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha,(HWV 263), is an anthem composed by George Frideric Handel.

Fort William Henry (Pemaquid Beach, Maine)

Fort William HenryFort CharlesFort Frederick
1728 also saw the foundation of Fredericksburg, Virginia, which was named after him – his other namesakes are Prince Frederick, Maryland (1722), Fort Frederick, Maine (1729–30), Fort Frederick, South Carolina (1730–34), Fort Frederick, New York (completed 1735) and Fort Frederica, Georgia (founded 1736), while Fort Frederick, Maryland, Point Frederick, Ontario, Fort Frederick, Ontario and Fort Frederick, New Brunswick were also named after him posthumously.
After Father Rale's War, Colonel David Dunbar, Surveyor-General of the King's Woods, rebuilt the fort in 1729–1730, renaming it Fort Frederick.