Frederick III, German Emperor

Frederick IIIFriedrich IIIEmperor Frederick IIIFrederickPrince Frederick of PrussiaCrown Prince FrederickFriedrich WilhelmPrince Frederick William of PrussiaKaiser Friedrich IIIFrederick William
Frederick III (Friedrich III.; 18 October 1831 – 15 June 1888) was German Emperor and King of Prussia for ninety-nine days in 1888, the Year of the Three Emperors.wikipedia
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Victoria, Princess Royal

VictoriaEmpress FrederickPrincess Victoria
Frederick married Victoria, Princess Royal, eldest daughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom.
Victoria, Princess Royal (Victoria Adelaide Mary Louisa; 21 November 1840 – 5 August 1901) was German Empress and Queen of Prussia by marriage to German Emperor Frederick III.

University of Bonn

BonnBonn UniversityRheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
Frederick, in spite of his conservative militaristic family background, had developed liberal tendencies as a result of his ties with Britain and his studies at the University of Bonn.
As of August 2018, among its notable alumni, faculty and researchers are 10 Nobel Laureates, 4 Fields Medalists, twelve Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize winners as well as August Kekulé, Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Marx, Heinrich Heine, Prince Albert, Pope Benedict XVI, Frederick III, Max Ernst, Konrad Adenauer, and Joseph Schumpeter.

Year of the Three Emperors

Year of Three Emperors1888
Frederick III (Friedrich III.; 18 October 1831 – 15 June 1888) was German Emperor and King of Prussia for ninety-nine days in 1888, the Year of the Three Emperors.
The three different emperors who ruled over Germany during this year were Wilhelm I, Frederick III, and Wilhelm II.

Princess Louise of Prussia

LouiseGrand Duchess Louise of BadenGrand Duchess of Baden
He had one sister, Louise (later Grand Duchess of Baden), who was eight years his junior and very close to him.
She was the younger sister of Frederick III of Germany ("Fritz") and aunt of Wilhelm II of Germany.

New Palace (Potsdam)

New PalaceNeues PalaisNeues Palais, Potsdam
Frederick William was born in the New Palace at Potsdam in Prussia on 18 October 1831.
However, starting in 1859 it became the summer residence of the German Crown Prince, Frederick William, later German Emperor Frederick III.

Otto von Bismarck

BismarckChancellor BismarckPrince Bismarck
As the Crown Prince, he often opposed the conservative Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, particularly in speaking out against Bismarck's policy of uniting Germany through force, and in urging that the power of the Chancellorship be curbed.
The King's brother, Prince Wilhelm, had fled to England; Bismarck tried to get Wilhelm's wife Augusta to place their teenage son Frederick William on the Prussian throne in Frederick William IV's place.

Franco-Prussian War

Franco-German WarWar of 1870Franco Prussian War
Although celebrated as a young man for his leadership and successes during the Second Schleswig, Austro-Prussian and Franco-Prussian wars, he nevertheless professed a hatred of warfare and was praised by friends and enemies alike for his humane conduct.
Moltke had indeed massed three armies in the area—the Prussian First Army with 50,000 men, commanded by General Karl von Steinmetz opposite Saarlouis, the Prussian Second Army with 134,000 men commanded by Prince Friedrich Karl opposite the line Forbach-Spicheren, and the Prussian Third Army with 120,000 men commanded by Crown Prince Friedrich Wilhelm, poised to cross the border at Wissembourg.

Wilhelm II, German Emperor

Wilhelm IIKaiser Wilhelm IIKaiser Wilhelm
However, Frederick's illness prevented him from effectively establishing policies and measures to achieve this, and such moves as he was able to make were later abandoned by his son and successor, Wilhelm II. The couple often resided at the Crown Prince's Palace and had eight children: Wilhelm in 1859, Charlotte in 1860, Henry in 1862, Sigismund in 1864, Victoria in 1866, Waldemar in 1868, Sophia in 1870 and Margaret in 1872.
For most of his life before becoming emperor, he was second in line to succeed his grandfather Wilhelm I on the German and Prussian thrones after his father, Crown Prince Frederick.

Sophia of Prussia

SophiaPrincess Sophia of PrussiaQueen Sophia
The couple often resided at the Crown Prince's Palace and had eight children: Wilhelm in 1859, Charlotte in 1860, Henry in 1862, Sigismund in 1864, Victoria in 1866, Waldemar in 1868, Sophia in 1870 and Margaret in 1872.
A member of the House of Hohenzollern and daughter of Frederick III, German Emperor, Sophia received a liberal and anglophile education, under the supervision of her mother, Victoria, Princess Royal.

Princess Viktoria of Prussia

Princess ViktoriaVictoriaViktoria
The couple often resided at the Crown Prince's Palace and had eight children: Wilhelm in 1859, Charlotte in 1860, Henry in 1862, Sigismund in 1864, Victoria in 1866, Waldemar in 1868, Sophia in 1870 and Margaret in 1872.
Princess Viktoria of Prussia (Friederike Amalia Wilhelmine Viktoria) (12 April 1866 – 13 November 1929) was the second daughter of Frederick III, German Emperor and his wife Victoria, Princess Royal, a daughter of Queen Victoria.

Princess Margaret of Prussia

MargaretMargaret of PrussiaPrincess Margaret
The couple often resided at the Crown Prince's Palace and had eight children: Wilhelm in 1859, Charlotte in 1860, Henry in 1862, Sigismund in 1864, Victoria in 1866, Waldemar in 1868, Sophia in 1870 and Margaret in 1872.
Princess Margaret of Prussia (Margarete Beatrice Feodora; 22 April 1872 – 22 January 1954) was a daughter of Frederick III, German Emperor and Victoria, Princess Royal, and the younger sister of Emperor Wilhelm II and a granddaughter of Queen Victoria.

Grand Landlodge of the Freemasons of Germany

Grand Master of the Masonic LodgeGroße Landesloge der Freimaurer von Deutschland
In 1853, Frederick was initiated into Freemasonry by his father, then Prince William of Prussia, and would later become Master of the Order of the Grand Landlodge of the Freemasons of Germany.
The most prominent Master of the Order was the future (1888) German Emperor Frederick III.

Queen Victoria

VictoriaVictoria of the United KingdomDiamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria
Frederick married Victoria, Princess Royal, eldest daughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom.
Eleven days after Orsini's assassination attempt in France, Victoria's eldest daughter married Prince Frederick William of Prussia in London.

William I, German Emperor

Wilhelm IWilliam IKaiser Wilhelm I
In 1853, Frederick was initiated into Freemasonry by his father, then Prince William of Prussia, and would later become Master of the Order of the Grand Landlodge of the Freemasons of Germany. Known informally as "Fritz", he was the only son of Emperor Wilhelm I and was raised in his family's tradition of military service.
After the latter was won by Prussia, William wanted to march on to Vienna and annex Austria, but was dissuaded from doing so by Bismarck and Crown Prince Frederick.

Albert, Prince Consort

Prince AlbertPrince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and GothaPrince Consort
Frederick and Victoria were great admirers of Prince Albert, Queen Victoria's husband.
During the war, Albert arranged the marriage of his fourteen-year-old daughter, Victoria, to Prince Frederick William of Prussia, though Albert delayed the marriage until Victoria was seventeen.

House of Hohenzollern

HohenzollernHohenzollernsHohenzollern dynasty
He was a scion of the House of Hohenzollern, rulers of Prussia, then the most powerful of the German states.

Kronprinzenpalais

Crown Prince's PalaceCrown Prince's Palace in BerlinCrown Prince Palace
The couple often resided at the Crown Prince's Palace and had eight children: Wilhelm in 1859, Charlotte in 1860, Henry in 1862, Sigismund in 1864, Victoria in 1866, Waldemar in 1868, Sophia in 1870 and Margaret in 1872.
In 1856–57, Johann Heinrich Strack extensively rebuilt the palace for William I's son, Prince Frederick William (the future Kaiser Frederick III), giving it substantially its present appearance.

Siege of Paris (1870–71)

Siege of ParisSiege of Paris (1870–1871)Paris
He was praised for his leadership after defeating the French at the battles of Wissembourg and Wörth, and met with further successes at the Battle of Sedan and during the Siege of Paris.
As early as August 1870, the Prussian 3rd Army led by Crown Prince Frederick of Prussia (the future Emperor Frederick III), had been marching towards Paris.

Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria

Golden JubileeQueen Victoria's Golden JubileeGolden
Retaining his military portfolio, he continued to represent Germany and its Emperor at ceremonies, weddings, and celebrations such as Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee in 1887.

Battle of Wörth

WörthBattle of FroeschwillerBattle of Reichshoffen
He was praised for his leadership after defeating the French at the battles of Wissembourg and Wörth, and met with further successes at the Battle of Sedan and during the Siege of Paris.
In the second battle, troops from Germany commanded by Crown Prince Frederick and directed by his Chief of Staff, General Leonhard Graf von Blumenthal, defeated the French under Marshal MacMahon near the village of Wœrth in Alsace, on the Sauer River, 10 km north of Haguenau.

Ernst Curtius

CurtiusE. CurtiusCurtius, Ernst
His private tutor was Ernst Curtius, a famous archaeologist.
In 1844 he became an extraordinary professor at the University of Berlin, and in the same year he was appointed tutor to Prince Frederick William (afterwards the Emperor Frederick III), a post which he held until 1850.

Bode Museum

Kaiser Friedrich MuseumKaiser-Friedrich-MuseumBode-Museum
To assist his father's effort to turn Berlin, the capital city, into a great cultural centre, he was appointed Protector of Public Museums; it was largely due to Frederick that considerable artistic collections were acquired, housed in Berlin's new Kaiser Friedrich Museum (later known as the Bode Museum) after his death.
Originally called the Kaiser-Friedrich-Museum after Emperor Frederick III, the museum was renamed in honour of its first curator, Wilhelm von Bode, in 1956.

Austro-Prussian War

War of 1866Seven Weeks' WarAustro-Prussian
Although celebrated as a young man for his leadership and successes during the Second Schleswig, Austro-Prussian and Franco-Prussian wars, he nevertheless professed a hatred of warfare and was praised by friends and enemies alike for his humane conduct.
William had "planned to install both the crown prince of Hanover and the nephew of the elector of Hesse as titular grand dukes in small territorial residuals of their dynastic inheritance" by opposition in the government cabinet, including Crown Prince Frederick to the annexation of several German states.

Battle of Königgrätz

KöniggrätzBattle of SadowaSadowa
The timely arrival of his II Army was crucial to the Prussian victory in 1866 at the decisive Battle of Königgrätz, which won the war for Prussia.
At the outset of the war in June, the Prussian armies were gathered along the Prussian border: the Army of the Elbe under Karl Herwarth von Bittenfeld at Torgau, the First Army under Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia between Senftenberg and Görlitz, and the Second Army under Crown Prince Frederick in Silesia west of Neiße (Nysa).

St James's Palace

St. James's PalaceSt James’s PalaceSt James
The betrothal of the young couple was announced on May 19, 1857, at Buckingham Palace and the Prussian Court, and their marriage took place on 25 January 1858 in the Chapel Royal of St. James's Palace, London.
It was nevertheless where Victoria married her husband, Prince Albert, in 1840, and where, eighteen years later, Victoria and Albert's eldest child, Princess Victoria, married her husband, Prince Frederick of Prussia.