Frederick Osborn

Frederick H. Osborn
Major General Frederick Henry Osborn (21 March 1889 – 5 January 1981) was an American philanthropist, military leader, and eugenicist.wikipedia
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Society for Biodemography and Social Biology

American Eugenics Society
He was one of the founding members of the American Eugenics Society in 1926 and joined the Galton Institute in 1928, serving as its Secretary in 1931.
The organization started by promoting racial betterment, eugenic health, and genetic education through public lectures, exhibits at county fairs etc. Under the direction of Frederick Osborn the society started to place greater focus on issues of population control, genetics, and, later, medical genetics.

Office of Population Research

He played a central role in the 1936 founding of the Office of Population Research at Princeton University, a leading demographic research and training center.
Major General and philanthropist Frederick H. Osborn, a graduate of Princeton University, laid the foundation for the Office of Population Research in 1936.

Pioneer Fund

Osborn was one of the founding trustees of the Pioneer Fund in 1937, a charitable foundation charged with promoting eugenics.
Frederick Osborn wrote in 1937 that the Nazi Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring was "the most exciting experiment that had ever been tried". Osborn was the secretary of the American Eugenics Society, which was part of an accepted and active field at the time, the Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Selective Service during World War II and later the Deputy U.S. Representative to the U.N. Atomic Energy Commission.

Galton Institute

Eugenics SocietyEugenics Education SocietyBritish Eugenics Society
He was one of the founding members of the American Eugenics Society in 1926 and joined the Galton Institute in 1928, serving as its Secretary in 1931.
Frederick Osborn

Eugenics

eugenicisteugeniceugenicists
He was a founder of several organizations and played a central part in reorienting eugenics in the years following World War II away from the race- and class-consciousness of earlier periods.
Frederick Osborn's 1937 journal article "Development of a Eugenic Philosophy" framed it as a social philosophy—that is, a philosophy with implications for social order.

American Philosophical Society

Transactions of the American Philosophical SocietyPhilosophical SocietyThe American Philosophical Society
The American Philosophical Society considers him to have been "the respectable face of eugenic research in the post-war period."(APS, 1983)

Princeton University

PrincetonCollege of New JerseyPrinceton College
He played a central role in the 1936 founding of the Office of Population Research at Princeton University, a leading demographic research and training center. Osborn graduated from Princeton University in 1910 and attended Trinity College, Cambridge, for a postgraduate year.

Trinity College, Cambridge

Trinity CollegeTrinity3rd Trinity
Osborn graduated from Princeton University in 1910 and attended Trinity College, Cambridge, for a postgraduate year.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarFirst
His family had made their fortune in the railroad business, and he went into the family business up until the outbreak of World War I, when he served in the American Red Cross in France as Commander of the Advance Zone for the last 11 months of the war.

American Red Cross

Red Crossthe Red CrossAmerican
His family had made their fortune in the railroad business, and he went into the family business up until the outbreak of World War I, when he served in the American Red Cross in France as Commander of the Advance Zone for the last 11 months of the war.

France

🇫🇷FrenchFRA
His family had made their fortune in the railroad business, and he went into the family business up until the outbreak of World War I, when he served in the American Red Cross in France as Commander of the Advance Zone for the last 11 months of the war.

American Museum of Natural History

AMNHMuseum of Natural HistoryThe American Museum of Natural History
In 1928, he became a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History studying anthropology and population.

Anthropology

anthropologistanthropologicalanthropologists
In 1928, he became a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History studying anthropology and population.

Population

populationspopulacepopulated
In 1928, he became a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History studying anthropology and population.

J. Philippe Rushton

RushtonJean Philippe RushtonPhil Rushton
According to J. Phillipe Rushton, Osborn was the first to point out that although African Americans scored lower than whites on the Army intelligence tests, those from five urban northern states scored slightly higher than whites from eight rural southern states did, demonstrating the influence of cultural factors on IQ scores.

Intelligence quotient

IQintelligence testI.Q.
According to J. Phillipe Rushton, Osborn was the first to point out that although African Americans scored lower than whites on the Army intelligence tests, those from five urban northern states scored slightly higher than whites from eight rural southern states did, demonstrating the influence of cultural factors on IQ scores.

Urban area

Urbanurban agglomerationagglomeration
According to J. Phillipe Rushton, Osborn was the first to point out that although African Americans scored lower than whites on the Army intelligence tests, those from five urban northern states scored slightly higher than whites from eight rural southern states did, demonstrating the influence of cultural factors on IQ scores.

Northern United States

NorthNorthernNorthern states
According to J. Phillipe Rushton, Osborn was the first to point out that although African Americans scored lower than whites on the Army intelligence tests, those from five urban northern states scored slightly higher than whites from eight rural southern states did, demonstrating the influence of cultural factors on IQ scores.

Rural area

ruralcountrysiderural locality
According to J. Phillipe Rushton, Osborn was the first to point out that although African Americans scored lower than whites on the Army intelligence tests, those from five urban northern states scored slightly higher than whites from eight rural southern states did, demonstrating the influence of cultural factors on IQ scores.

Southern United States

SouthSouthernthe South
According to J. Phillipe Rushton, Osborn was the first to point out that although African Americans scored lower than whites on the Army intelligence tests, those from five urban northern states scored slightly higher than whites from eight rural southern states did, demonstrating the influence of cultural factors on IQ scores.

Race and intelligence

racial differences in intelligenceblack people have lower IQsintellectually inferior
According to J. Phillipe Rushton, Osborn was the first to point out that although African Americans scored lower than whites on the Army intelligence tests, those from five urban northern states scored slightly higher than whites from eight rural southern states did, demonstrating the influence of cultural factors on IQ scores.

Hereditarianism

hereditarianhereditarians
In the following decades, Osborn remained skeptical of the hereditarian hypothesis of the variance in IQ scores found between racial groups.

Race (human categorization)

raceracialraces
In the following decades, Osborn remained skeptical of the hereditarian hypothesis of the variance in IQ scores found between racial groups.

Sweden

🇸🇪SwedishSWE
An admirer of the reforms instituted in 1930s Sweden through the efforts of economist Gunnar Myrdal and his wife Alva Myrdal, Osborn emphasized the eugenic potential of extended state support in childcare, recreation, housing, nursery services, and education as a means of stimulating fertility among desirable populations.

Gunnar Myrdal

GunnarMyrdal, Gunnar
An admirer of the reforms instituted in 1930s Sweden through the efforts of economist Gunnar Myrdal and his wife Alva Myrdal, Osborn emphasized the eugenic potential of extended state support in childcare, recreation, housing, nursery services, and education as a means of stimulating fertility among desirable populations.