Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel

Duke of BrunswickFrederick WilliamFrederick William of Brunswick-WolfenbüttelFrederick William, Duke of BrunswickFrederick William, Duke of Brunswick-LüneburgFriedrich Wilhelmfourth one isFrederick William, Duke of Brunswick and LüneburgFriedrich Wilhelm, Duke of Brunswick-WolfenbüttelDuke [of Brunswick]
Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (Friedrich Wilhelm; 9 October 1771 – 16 June 1815) was a German prince and Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and Oels.wikipedia
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Black Brunswickers

Brunswick OelsBlack HussarsBrunswick
Nicknamed "The Black Duke", he was a military officer who led the Black Brunswickers against French domination in Germany.
The corps was raised from volunteers by German-born Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (1771–1815).

Braunschweig

BrunswickBrunswick, GermanyBraunschweig, Germany
Prince Frederick William of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel was born in Braunschweig as the fourth son of Charles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (on the latter's 36th birthday), and Princess Augusta of Great Britain.
The exiled duke Frederick William raised a volunteer corps, the Black Brunswickers, who fought the French in several battles.

Princess Augusta of Great Britain

Princess AugustaAugustaAugusta of Great Britain
Prince Frederick William of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel was born in Braunschweig as the fourth son of Charles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (on the latter's 36th birthday), and Princess Augusta of Great Britain.
The fourth one is the only normal one, but also torments his parents by his immoral behavior.

Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg

Brunswick-LüneburgDuke of Brunswick-LüneburgBrunswick
Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (Friedrich Wilhelm; 9 October 1771 – 16 June 1815) was a German prince and Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and Oels.

Duchess of Richmond's ball

ballball given by the Duchess of Richmondball of the Duchess of Richmond
He was killed by a gunshot at the Battle of Quatre Bras on 16 June, the night after he had attended the Duchess of Richmond's ball in Brussels and left it happy to have a chance to show his fighting ability.

Princess Marie of Baden (1782–1808)

Princess Marie of BadenMarie of BadenMaria Elisabeth Wilhelmine, Princess of Baden
On 1 November 1802, in Karlsruhe, Frederick William married Princess Marie Elisabeth of Baden (7 September 1782 Karlsruhe – 20 April 1808 Bruchsal), daughter of Charles Louis, Hereditary Prince of Baden.
She was married to Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, and was the daughter of Charles Louis, Hereditary Prince of Baden, and Landgravine Amalie of Hesse-Darmstadt.

Charles II, Duke of Brunswick

Charles IICharlesDuke Karl of Brunswick
Charles was born in Brunswick, the eldest son of Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg.

Frederick Augustus, Prince of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel-Oels

Frederick AugustusFrederick August IFrederick Augustus of Brunswick-Lüneburg
In 1805, after his uncle, Frederick Augustus, Duke of Oels, had died childless, Frederick William inherited the Duchy of Oels, a small mediatized principality in Silesia subordinate to the King of Prussia.
The duchy of Oels passed to his nephew Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, the so-called 'Black Duke'.

William, Duke of Brunswick

WilliamWilliam of BrunswickWilliam VIII
William was the second son of Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and after the death of his father in 1815, was under the guardianship of King George IV of the United Kingdom.

War of the Fifth Coalition

Fifth Coalition1809 campaignFifth
When the War of the Fifth Coalition broke out in 1809, Frederick William used this opportunity to create a corps of partisans with the support of the Austrian Empire.
The Duke of Brunswick however, refused to be bound by the armistice and led his corps on a fighting march right across Germany to the mouth of the River Weser, from where they sailed to England and entered British service.

Battle of Quatre Bras

Quatre BrasQuatre-BrasBattle of Quatre-Bras
He was killed by a gunshot at the Battle of Quatre Bras on 16 June, the night after he had attended the Duchess of Richmond's ball in Brussels and left it happy to have a chance to show his fighting ability.
The Brunswick Corps, under the Duke of Brunswick, now reached the field, but their commander received a mortal wound while leading a charge and the attack failed.

Charles Louis, Hereditary Prince of Baden

Charles LouisKarl Ludwig of BadenCharles Louis of Baden
On 1 November 1802, in Karlsruhe, Frederick William married Princess Marie Elisabeth of Baden (7 September 1782 Karlsruhe – 20 April 1808 Bruchsal), daughter of Charles Louis, Hereditary Prince of Baden.

Charles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick

Duke of BrunswickCharles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick-WolfenbüttelCharles William Ferdinand
Prince Frederick William of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel was born in Braunschweig as the fourth son of Charles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (on the latter's 36th birthday), and Princess Augusta of Great Britain.
The fourth son, Friedrich Wilhelm (1771 – 16 June 1815), was sound of mind and body.

Duchy of Oels

OelsOleśnicaDuchy of Oleśnica
Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (Friedrich Wilhelm; 9 October 1771 – 16 June 1815) was a German prince and Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and Oels. In 1805, after his uncle, Frederick Augustus, Duke of Oels, had died childless, Frederick William inherited the Duchy of Oels, a small mediatized principality in Silesia subordinate to the King of Prussia.

French period

French occupationFrenchFrench control
Nicknamed "The Black Duke", he was a military officer who led the Black Brunswickers against French domination in Germany.

Principality of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel

Brunswick-WolfenbüttelDuchy of Brunswick-WolfenbüttelBrunswick
He briefly ruled the state of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel from 1806 to 1807 and again from 1813 to 1815.

George IV of the United Kingdom

George IVKing George IVPrince Regent
He was the cousin and brother-in-law (from 8 April 1795) of his friend George IV, Prince Regent of the United Kingdom (from 1811).

Prussian Army

Royal Prussian ArmyPrussianArmy
He joined the Prussian army in 1789 as a captain and participated in battles against Revolutionary France.

Captain (armed forces)

CaptaincaptainsCapt.
He joined the Prussian army in 1789 as a captain and participated in battles against Revolutionary France.

French Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary FranceRevolutionary
He joined the Prussian army in 1789 as a captain and participated in battles against Revolutionary France.

German mediatisation

mediatisedsecularisationGerman mediatization
In 1805, after his uncle, Frederick Augustus, Duke of Oels, had died childless, Frederick William inherited the Duchy of Oels, a small mediatized principality in Silesia subordinate to the King of Prussia.

Frederick William III of Prussia

Frederick William IIIFriedrich Wilhelm IIIKing of Prussia
In 1805, after his uncle, Frederick Augustus, Duke of Oels, had died childless, Frederick William inherited the Duchy of Oels, a small mediatized principality in Silesia subordinate to the King of Prussia.

Battle of Jena–Auerstedt

Battle of Jena-AuerstedtBattle of JenaJena
In October 1806, Frederick William participated in the Battle of Jena-Auerstädt as a major general of the Prussian army, of which his father was the field marshal.

Major general

Major-GeneralMaj. Gen.General-major
In October 1806, Frederick William participated in the Battle of Jena-Auerstädt as a major general of the Prussian army, of which his father was the field marshal.