Frederick Winslow Taylor

Frederick TaylorFrederick W. TaylorTaylorF. W. TaylorF.W. TaylorFred TaylorFred W. TaylorF.W TaylorFredrick Winslow TaylorShop Management
Frederick Winslow Taylor (March 20, 1856 – March 21, 1915) was an American mechanical engineer who sought to improve industrial efficiency.wikipedia
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Efficiency movement

Bedaux SystemEfficiencyNational Efficiency
Taylor was one of the intellectual leaders of the Efficiency Movement and his ideas, broadly conceived, were highly influential in the Progressive Era (1890s–1920s).
Perhaps the best known leaders were engineers Frederick Winslow Taylor (1856–1915), who used a stopwatch to identify the smallest inefficiencies, and Frank Bunker Gilbreth Sr. (1868–1924) who proclaimed there was always "one best way" to fix a problem.

Progressive Era

ProgressiveProgressive movementProgressives
Taylor was one of the intellectual leaders of the Efficiency Movement and his ideas, broadly conceived, were highly influential in the Progressive Era (1890s–1920s).
A third theme was building an Efficiency Movement in every sector that could identify old ways that needed modernizing, and bring to bear scientific, medical and engineering solutions; a key part of the efficiency movement was scientific management, or "Taylorism".

Midvale Steel

Midvale Steel CompanyMidvale Steel and Ordnance CompanyMidvale Steel Works
Taylor finished his four-year apprenticeship and in 1878 became a machine-shop laborer at Midvale Steel Works.
It was in the 1880s that Frederick Winslow Taylor rose through the ranks at Midvale, from lathe operator, to gang boss, to engineer, to chief engineer of the works.

Scientific management

TaylorismTayloristTaylor System
His focus on the human component of production Taylor labeled scientific management.
Scientific management is sometimes known as Taylorism after its founder, Frederick Winslow Taylor.

Lean manufacturing

Leanlean productionLean management
Frederick Winslow Taylor (March 20, 1856 – March 21, 1915) was an American mechanical engineer who sought to improve industrial efficiency.
Frederick Winslow Taylor, the father of scientific management, introduced what are now called standardization and best practice deployment.

Stevens Institute of Technology

Stevens TechStevensStevens Institute
Taylor became a student of Stevens Institute of Technology, studying via correspondence and obtaining a degree in mechanical engineering in 1883.
Stevens’ S.C. Williams Library houses the University's Special Collections, which of most prominence, contain the largest compendium of items relating to Frederick Winslow Taylor, Class of 1883, the finest accumulations in the Western Hemisphere of prints, manuscripts in facsimile and books by and about Leonardo da Vinci.

Bethlehem Steel

Bethlehem Steel CorporationBethlehem Steel CompanyBethlehem Steel Co.
In 1898 he joined Bethlehem Steel to solve an expensive machine-shop capacity problem.
In 1898, Frederick Taylor joined Bethlehem Steel as a management consultant in order to solve an expensive machine shop capacity problem.

The Principles of Scientific Management

Principles of Scientific Managementhis influential 1911 monograph
In 1911, Taylor summed up his efficiency techniques in his book The Principles of Scientific Management which, in 2001, Fellows of the Academy of Management voted the most influential management book of the twentieth century.
The Principles of Scientific Management ( 1911) is a monograph published by Frederick Winslow Taylor.

Schmidt (worker)

Schmidt
Debate about Taylor's Bethlehem study of workers, particularly the stereotypical laborer "Schmidt", continues to this day.
Schmidt (worker) is a character in Principles of Scientific Management by Frederick Winslow Taylor.

Clarence Clark (tennis)

Clarence ClarkClarence Munroe ClarkClarence M. Clark
(Edward Clark's son Clarence Clark, who was also a manager at Midvale Steel, married Taylor's sister.) While Taylor worked at Midvale, he and Clarence Clark won the first tennis doubles tournament in the 1881 US National Championships, the precursor of the US Open.
That same year, he won the first doubles tournament in the U.S. National Championships (later called the U.S. Open), playing with Frederick Winslow Taylor, after defeating first the favored Richard Sears/James Dwight, and in the final round, Alexander Van Rensselaer/Arthur Newbold.

Time and motion study

time and motion studiestime and motiontime-and-motion studies
He is most remembered for developing the stopwatch time study, which, combined with Frank Gilbreth's motion study methods, later became the field of time and motion study.
A time and motion study (or time-motion study) is a business efficiency technique combining the Time Study work of Frederick Winslow Taylor with the Motion Study work of Frank and Lillian Gilbreth (the same couple as is best known through the biographical 1950 film and book Cheaper by the Dozen).

Machine shop

machinemachine-shopmachine repair shop
Taylor finished his four-year apprenticeship and in 1878 became a machine-shop laborer at Midvale Steel Works. In 1898 he joined Bethlehem Steel to solve an expensive machine-shop capacity problem.
In 1903 the Cyclopedia of Modern Shop Practice was published with Howard Monroe Raymond as Editor-in-Chief, and in the same year Frederick Winslow Taylor published his ''Shop management; a paper read before the American society of mechanical engineers.

Germantown, Philadelphia

GermantownGermantown, PennsylvaniaGermantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Taylor was born in 1856 to a Quaker family in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Tuck School of Business

Amos Tuck School of Business AdministrationAmos Tuck School of BusinessTuck School of Business at Dartmouth
Taylor eventually became a professor at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College.
Person, in 1911, invited 300 leaders of industry, including Frederick Winslow Taylor — who later became a professor at Tuck — and Lillian Gilbreth, to a major conference on scientific management, which business historians consider the kick-off for what later became the worldwide scientific management movement.

Charles Bedaux

BedauxBedaux BritainBedaux Company
This disparity was largely due to what historians have been analysing: recent research has revealed that Taylor's practices diffused to Britain more through consultancies, in particular the Bedaux consultancy, than through institutions, as in Germany and to a lesser extent France, where a mixture was most effective.
In this, he was strongly influenced by F. W. Taylor's book Shop Management, particularly Taylor's time study practices, and Charles E. Knoeppel's writings on industrial layout and routing.

1881 U.S. National Championships (tennis)

18811881 U.S. National Championships1881 US National Championships
While Taylor worked at Midvale, he and Clarence Clark won the first tennis doubles tournament in the 1881 US National Championships, the precursor of the US Open.
🇺🇸 Clarence Clark / 🇺🇸 Fred Taylor defeated 🇺🇸 Arthur Newbold / 🇺🇸 Alexander Van Rensselaer, 6-5, 6-4, 6-5

Paulette Bernège

Around 1922 the journalist Paulette Bernège became interested in Taylor's theories, which were popular in France in the post-war period.
This may well be where she became interested in the theories of Frederick Winslow Taylor, which were very popular in the post-war period.

Harrington Emerson

Emerson
Through the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, he got acquainted with the work of Frederick W. Taylor, which he implemented in his own praxis.

Lillian Moller Gilbreth

Lillian GilbrethLillianLillian M. Gilbreth
The Gilbreths were certain that the revolutionary ideas of Frederick Winslow Taylor would be neither easy to implement nor sufficient; their implementation would require hard work by engineers and psychologists to make them successful.

Carl Georg Barth

Carl G. BarthCarl BarthBarth, Carl Georg
In 1899, efficiency expert Frederick W. Taylor hired Barth to work with him at Bethlehem Steel Company.

Edward Filene

Edward A. FileneEdwardEdward Albert Filene
In Switzerland, the American Edward Albert Filene established the International Management Institute to spread information about management techniques.
Edward Filene drew inspiration from the scientific management ideas of Frederick Winslow Taylor and adapted these ideas for use in the retail environment.

Taylor Society

Society for the Advancement of ManagementThe Society for the Advancement of Management StudiesSociety for the Advancement of Management Conference
The Taylor Society was founded in 1912 by Taylor's allies to promote his values and influence.
The Taylor Society was an American society for the discussion and promotion of scientific management, named after Frederick Winslow Taylor.

Lyndall Urwick

Lyndall F. UrwickUrwickLyndall Fownes Urwick
Particularly enthusiastic were the Cadbury family, Seebohm Rowntree, Oliver Sheldon and Lyndall Urwick.
One was the work of F.W. Taylor with its concept of scientific management, and the other, counterbalancing it in its emphasis on the humanity of management was Mary Parker Follett, for whom he had great admiration.

West Laurel Hill Cemetery

West Laurel Hill
He was buried in West Laurel Hill Cemetery, in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania.

Henry Gantt

Henry L. GanttHenry Laurence GanttGantt
It was largely through his disciples' efforts (most notably Henry Gantt's) that industry came to implement his ideas.
In 1887 he joined Frederick W. Taylor in applying scientific management principles to the work at Midvale Steel and Bethlehem Steel, working there with Taylor until 1893.