Free Breakfast Table

The Free Breakfast Table was the demand of British working-class Liberalism from the 1860s to the early twentieth-century.wikipedia
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National Agricultural Labourers Union

NALU
The National Agricultural Labourers Union held the Free Breakfast Table as "an article of faith" and the idea helped to safeguard Liberal Party support in rural areas after the Representation of the People Act 1884.
It also supported the Liberal Party's "Free Breakfast Table" policy of abolishing taxes on basic foodstuffs.

Philip Snowden, 1st Viscount Snowden

Philip SnowdenSnowdenLord Snowden
The first Labour Chancellor of the Exchequer, Philip Snowden, produced his first Budget in 1924 and claimed it went "far to realize the cherished radical idea of a free breakfast table".
Snowden claimed that because of the lowering of duties on foodstuffs consumed by the working class, the budget went "far to realize the cherished radical idea of a free breakfast table".

United Kingdom

British🇬🇧UK
The Free Breakfast Table was the demand of British working-class Liberalism from the 1860s to the early twentieth-century.

Working class

working-classlower classworkers
The Free Breakfast Table was the demand of British working-class Liberalism from the 1860s to the early twentieth-century.

Liberalism

liberalliberalssocially liberal
The Free Breakfast Table was the demand of British working-class Liberalism from the 1860s to the early twentieth-century.

Duty (economics)

dutiesdutycustoms duties
It entailed abolishing duties on basic foodstuffs as these were indirect taxes and therefore regressive.

Indirect tax

indirect taxationindirect taxesindirect
It entailed abolishing duties on basic foodstuffs as these were indirect taxes and therefore regressive.

Regressive tax

regressiveregressive taxationburdening the poor
It entailed abolishing duties on basic foodstuffs as these were indirect taxes and therefore regressive.

Radicals (UK)

RadicalRadicalsEnglish Radical
The phrase is said to have been coined by the Radical MP John Bright.

John Bright

BrightJohn Bright MPJ. Bright
The phrase is said to have been coined by the Radical MP John Bright.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
The National Agricultural Labourers Union held the Free Breakfast Table as "an article of faith" and the idea helped to safeguard Liberal Party support in rural areas after the Representation of the People Act 1884.

Representation of the People Act 1884

Third Reform Act18841884 Reform Act
The National Agricultural Labourers Union held the Free Breakfast Table as "an article of faith" and the idea helped to safeguard Liberal Party support in rural areas after the Representation of the People Act 1884.

National Liberal Federation

NLF
In 1891 the National Liberal Federation convened in Newcastle and adopted the Newcastle Programme, which included a pledge in favour of the Free Breakfast Table.

The Newcastle Programme

In 1891 the National Liberal Federation convened in Newcastle and adopted the Newcastle Programme, which included a pledge in favour of the Free Breakfast Table.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
The first Labour Chancellor of the Exchequer, Philip Snowden, produced his first Budget in 1924 and claimed it went "far to realize the cherished radical idea of a free breakfast table".

Chancellor of the Exchequer

ChancellorChancellors of the ExchequerSpokesperson for the Treasury
The first Labour Chancellor of the Exchequer, Philip Snowden, produced his first Budget in 1924 and claimed it went "far to realize the cherished radical idea of a free breakfast table".

George Ridley (Labour politician)

George Ridley
As late as 1938 a Labour MP (George Ridley) was condemning the Conservatives' budget due to its "harsh and inhuman" increase on the tax on tea and thereby betraying the ideal of the free breakfast table.

First MacDonald ministry

first Labour governmentLabour governmentMacDonald I
Cuts in both direct and indirect taxation were also made which were hailed as representing a victory for working people, with the chancellor Philip Snowden describing the programme as representing "the greatest step ever taken towards the Radical idea of the free breakfast table."

William Ewart Gladstone

GladstoneWilliam GladstoneW. E. Gladstone
Gladstone's proposals went some way to meet working-class demands, such as the realisation of the free breakfast table through repealing duties on tea and sugar, and reform of local taxation which was increasing for the poorer ratepayers.

John Stuart McCaig

He advocated a free breakfast table, the deficiency in the revenue to be made up by an increase of the Income tax.