Free Software Foundation

FSFfree software communityFree Software Foundation's high priority listGNU PressHigh Priority Free Software Projecthigh priority projectsPlayOgg.org
The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded by Richard Stallman on 4 October 1985 to support the free software movement, which promotes the universal freedom to study, distribute, create, and modify computer software, with the organization's preference for software being distributed under copyleft ("share alike") terms, such as with its own GNU General Public License.wikipedia
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Richard Stallman

Richard M. StallmanStallman Stallman, Richard
The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded by Richard Stallman on 4 October 1985 to support the free software movement, which promotes the universal freedom to study, distribute, create, and modify computer software, with the organization's preference for software being distributed under copyleft ("share alike") terms, such as with its own GNU General Public License.
Stallman launched the GNU Project, founded the Free Software Foundation, developed the GNU Compiler Collection and GNU Emacs, and wrote the GNU General Public License.

Free software

freefree-softwarefreely
From its founding until the mid-1990s, FSF's funds were mostly used to employ software developers to write free software for the GNU Project. In March 2003, SCO filed suit against IBM alleging that IBM's contributions to various free software, including FSF's GNU, violated SCO's rights.
While this is often called 'access to source code' or 'public availability', the Free Software Foundation recommends against thinking in those terms, because it might give the impression that users have an obligation (as opposed to a right) to give non-users a copy of the program.

GNU Compiler Collection

GCCGNU C compilerg++
The FSF holds the copyrights on many pieces of the GNU system, such as GNU Compiler Collection.
The Free Software Foundation (FSF) distributes GCC under the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL).

Free software movement

free software communityopen source communityfree-software community
The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded by Richard Stallman on 4 October 1985 to support the free software movement, which promotes the universal freedom to study, distribute, create, and modify computer software, with the organization's preference for software being distributed under copyleft ("share alike") terms, such as with its own GNU General Public License.
Stallman later established the Free Software Foundation in 1985 to support the movement.

GNU

GNU ProjectGNU operating systemThe GNU Project
The FSF holds the copyrights on many pieces of the GNU system, such as GNU Compiler Collection. In March 2003, SCO filed suit against IBM alleging that IBM's contributions to various free software, including FSF's GNU, violated SCO's rights.
The GNU project includes an operating system kernel, GNU HURD, which was the original focus of the Free Software Foundation (FSF).

Copyleft

copyleft licenseweak copyleftby-nc-sa
The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded by Richard Stallman on 4 October 1985 to support the free software movement, which promotes the universal freedom to study, distribute, create, and modify computer software, with the organization's preference for software being distributed under copyleft ("share alike") terms, such as with its own GNU General Public License. As holder of these copyrights, it has the authority to enforce the copyleft requirements of the GNU General Public License (GPL) when copyright infringement occurs on that software.
According to Free Software Foundation compliance engineer David Turner, the term viral license creates a misunderstanding and a fear of using copylefted free software.

Peter T. Brown

In late 2001, Bradley M. Kuhn (then executive director), with the assistance of Moglen, David Turner, and Peter T. Brown, formalized these efforts into FSF's GPL Compliance Labs.
Peter T. Brown was the Executive Director of the Free Software Foundation (FSF) from 2005 until early 2011.

GNU Free Documentation License

GFDLGNU FDLGNU Free Documentation License (GFDL)
GNU licenses: The GNU General Public License (GPL) is a widely used license for free software projects. The current version (version 3) was released in June 2007. The FSF has also published the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL), the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL), and the GNU Affero General Public License (AGPL).
The GNU Free Documentation License (GNU FDL or simply GFDL) is a copyleft license for free documentation, designed by the Free Software Foundation (FSF) for the GNU Project.

GNU Lesser General Public License

LGPLGNU LGPLLGPLv3
GNU licenses: The GNU General Public License (GPL) is a widely used license for free software projects. The current version (version 3) was released in June 2007. The FSF has also published the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL), the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL), and the GNU Affero General Public License (AGPL).
The GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) is a free-software license published by the Free Software Foundation (FSF).

GNU Savannah

Savannah
Project hosting: FSF hosts software development projects on its Savannah website.
GNU Savannah is a project of the Free Software Foundation initiated by Loïc Dachary, which serves as a collaborative software development management system for free Software projects.

Free Software Directory

The Free Software Directory: This is a listing of software packages that have been verified as free software. Each package entry contains 47 pieces of information such as the project's homepage, developers, programming language, etc. The goals are to provide a search engine for free software, and to provide a cross-reference for users to check if a package has been verified as being free software. FSF has received a small amount of funding from UNESCO for this project. It is hoped that the directory can be translated into many languages in the future.
The Free Software Directory (FSD) is a project of the Free Software Foundation (FSF).

GNU Affero General Public License

AGPLAGPLv3GNU AGPL
GNU licenses: The GNU General Public License (GPL) is a widely used license for free software projects. The current version (version 3) was released in June 2007. The FSF has also published the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL), the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL), and the GNU Affero General Public License (AGPL).
The GNU Affero General Public License is a free, copyleft license published by the Free Software Foundation in November 2007, and based on the GNU General Public License, version 3 and the Affero General Public License.

The Free Software Definition

Free Software DefinitionFour Essential Freedomsfour freedoms
Maintaining the Free Software Definition: FSF maintains many of the documents that define the free software movement.
The Free Software Definition written by Richard Stallman and published by Free Software Foundation (FSF), defines free software as being software that ensures that the end users have freedom in using, studying, sharing and modifying that software.

Defective by Design

by design
Advocacy: FSF sponsors a number of campaigns against what it perceives as dangers to software freedom, including software patents, digital rights management (which the FSF and others have re-termed "digital restrictions management", as part of its effort to highlight technologies that are "designed to take away and limit your rights," ) and user interface copyright. Defective by Design is an FSF-initiated campaign against DRM. It also has a campaign to promote Ogg+Vorbis, a free alternative to proprietary formats like MP3 and AAC. FSF also sponsors free software projects it deems "high-priority".
Defective by Design is an anti-DRM initiative by the Free Software Foundation.

FSF Free Software Awards

Award for the Advancement of Free SoftwareFree Software Award2011 Award
Annual awards: "Award for the Advancement of Free Software" and "Free Software Award for Projects of Social Benefit"
Free Software Foundation (FSF) grants two annual awards.

UNESCO

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural OrganizationUnited Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization
The Free Software Directory: This is a listing of software packages that have been verified as free software. Each package entry contains 47 pieces of information such as the project's homepage, developers, programming language, etc. The goals are to provide a search engine for free software, and to provide a cross-reference for users to check if a package has been verified as being free software. FSF has received a small amount of funding from UNESCO for this project. It is hoped that the directory can be translated into many languages in the future.
Free Software Directory: since 1998 UNESCO and the Free Software Foundation have jointly funded this project cataloguing free software.

Digital rights management

DRMDRM-freedigital rights management (DRM)
Advocacy: FSF sponsors a number of campaigns against what it perceives as dangers to software freedom, including software patents, digital rights management (which the FSF and others have re-termed "digital restrictions management", as part of its effort to highlight technologies that are "designed to take away and limit your rights," ) and user interface copyright. Defective by Design is an FSF-initiated campaign against DRM. It also has a campaign to promote Ogg+Vorbis, a free alternative to proprietary formats like MP3 and AAC. FSF also sponsors free software projects it deems "high-priority". LibrePlanet wiki:The LibrePlanet wiki organizes FSF members into regional groups in order to promote free software activism against Digital Restrictions Management and other issues promoted by the FSF.
The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and the Free Software Foundation (FSF) consider the use of DRM systems to be an anti-competitive practice.

LibrePlanet

LibrePlanet wiki:The LibrePlanet wiki organizes FSF members into regional groups in order to promote free software activism against Digital Restrictions Management and other issues promoted by the FSF.
LibrePlanet (literally, "Free Planet") is a community project created and supported by the Free Software Foundation.

Eben Moglen

From 1991 until 2001, GPL enforcement was done informally, usually by Stallman himself, often with assistance from FSF's lawyer, Eben Moglen.
Moglen was closely involved with the Free Software Foundation, serving as general counsel from 1994-2016 and board member from 2000 to 2007.

GNU Debugger

gdbGDB-TkGNU debugger (GDB)
Current high priority tasks include reverse engineering proprietary firmware; reversible debugging in GNU Debugger; developing automatic transcription and video editing software, Coreboot, drivers for network routers and creating replacements for Skype, Google Earth, OpenDWG libraries, BitTorrent Sync and Oracle Forms.
Now it is maintained by the GDB Steering Committee which is appointed by the Free Software Foundation.

SCO Group, Inc. v. International Business Machines Corp.

against IBMSCO v. IBMfiled suit
In March 2003, SCO filed suit against IBM alleging that IBM's contributions to various free software, including FSF's GNU, violated SCO's rights.
On June 27, 2003, Eben Moglen, the counsel for the Free Software Foundation, released a more complete statement regarding the SCO lawsuit.

Software

computer softwaresoftware technologyprogram
The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded by Richard Stallman on 4 October 1985 to support the free software movement, which promotes the universal freedom to study, distribute, create, and modify computer software, with the organization's preference for software being distributed under copyleft ("share alike") terms, such as with its own GNU General Public License.
Non-profit software organizations include the Free Software Foundation, GNU Project and Mozilla Foundation.

GNU Classpath

Classpath
Previous projects highlighted as needing work included the Free Java implementations, GNU Classpath, and GNU Compiler for Java, which ensure compatibility for the Java part of OpenOffice.org, and the GNOME desktop environment (see Java: Licensing).
GNU Classpath was deemed a high priority project by the Free Software Foundation.

Harald Welte

In the interest of promoting copyleft assertiveness by software companies to the level that the FSF was already doing, in 2004 Harald Welte launched gpl-violations.org.
On 2008-03-19, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) announced that it had awarded the Award for the Advancement of Free Software for 2007 to Welte, stating that

Copyright infringement

piracysoftware piracypirated
As holder of these copyrights, it has the authority to enforce the copyleft requirements of the GNU General Public License (GPL) when copyright infringement occurs on that software.
Free Software Foundation (FSF)