Free State of Prussia

PrussiaPrussianState of PrussiaPrussian Free StateFree StateFreistaat Preußen1918beginning in 1933Minister-President of the Free State of PrussiaPrussia, Free State
The Free State of Prussia (Freistaat Preußen) was a state of Germany from 1918 to 1947.wikipedia
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Kingdom of Prussia

PrussiaPrussianPrussian court
The new state was a direct successor to the Kingdom of Prussia, but featured a democratic, republican government and smaller area based on territorial changes after the war.
However, the Free State of Prussia (Freistaat Preußen), which followed the abolition of the Kingdom of Prussia in the aftermath of World War I, was a major democratic force in Weimar Germany until the nationalist coup of 1932 known as the Preußenschlag.

Prussia

PrussianPrussian statePrussian army
After the end of World War II in 1945, Otto Braun approached Allied officials in occupied Germany to reinstate the legal Prussian government, but was rejected and Prussia was abolished in 1947.
The Kingdom of Prussia was thus abolished in favour of a republic—the Free State of Prussia, a state of Germany from 1918 until 1933.

Rhine Province

Rhenish PrussiaRhinelandPrussian Rhineland
The Rhine Province became a demilitarised zone, although it remained under Prussian civil administration.
The Rhine Province (Rheinprovinz), also known as Rhenish Prussia (Rheinpreußen) or synonymous with the Rhineland (Rheinland), was the westernmost province of the Kingdom of Prussia and the Free State of Prussia, within the German Reich, from 1822 to 1946.

Province of Posen

PosenProvinz PosenPosen Province
The bulk of Prussia's losses were to Poland, including most of the provinces of Posen and West Prussia, and an eastern section of Silesia. The remainder of the provinces of Posen and West Prussia were combined to form Posen-West Prussia in 1922.
Posen was part of the Free State of Prussia within Weimar Germany from 1918, but was dissolved the following year when most of its territory was ceded to the Second Polish Republic by the Treaty of Versailles, and the remaining German territory was later re-organized into Posen-West Prussia in 1922.

Province of Silesia

SilesiaPrussian SilesiaSilesia Province
The bulk of Prussia's losses were to Poland, including most of the provinces of Posen and West Prussia, and an eastern section of Silesia. The remainder of province of Silesia that was not ceded to Poland and Czechoslovakia was split into the provinces of Upper Silesia and Lower Silesia in 1919 – although they were temporarily recombined (1938–1941). This amounted to most of Silesia, Eastern Pomerania, the Neumark region of Brandenburg, all of Posen-West Prussia, and the remainder of East Prussia not ceded to Russia.
In 1919, as part of the Free State of Prussia within Weimar Germany, Silesia was divided into the provinces of Upper Silesia and Lower Silesia.

East Prussia

Province of East PrussiaEastern PrussiaEast Prussian
These losses separated East Prussia from the rest of the country, now only accessible by rail through the Polish corridor or by sea. This amounted to most of Silesia, Eastern Pomerania, the Neumark region of Brandenburg, all of Posen-West Prussia, and the remainder of East Prussia not ceded to Russia.
East Prussia (Ostpreußen, ; Prusy Wschodnie; Rytų Prūsija; Borussia orientalis; Восточная Пруссия) was a province of the Kingdom of Prussia from 1773 to 1829 and again from 1878 (with the Kingdom itself being part of the German Empire from 1871); following World War I it formed part of the Weimar Republic's Free State of Prussia, until 1945.

West Prussia

Province of West PrussiaWestWestpreußen
The bulk of Prussia's losses were to Poland, including most of the provinces of Posen and West Prussia, and an eastern section of Silesia. The remainder of the provinces of Posen and West Prussia were combined to form Posen-West Prussia in 1922.
From 1918, West Prussia was a province of the Free State of Prussia within Weimar Germany, losing most of its territory to the Second Polish Republic and the Free City of Danzig in the Treaty of Versailles.

Franz von Papen

Papenvon PapenCabinet of Barons
All of this changed on 20 July 1932 with the Preußenschlag ("Prussian coup"): Reich Chancellor Franz von Papen got President Hindenburg to remove the elected Prussian state government under Otto Braun on the pretext that it had lost control of public order.
He launched the Preußenschlag coup against the Social Democratic government of the Free State of Prussia.

Provinces of Prussia

provincePrussian provincesPrussian province
In the centralized state created by the Nazis in the "Law on the Reconstruction of the Reich" ("Gesetz über den Neuaufbau des Reiches", 30 January 1934) and the "Law on Reich Governors" ("Reichsstatthaltergesetz", 30 January 1935) the States and Provinces of Prussia were dissolved, in fact if not in law.
Provinces constituted the highest level of administration in the Kingdom of Prussia and Free State of Prussia until 1933, when Nazi Germany established de facto direct rule over provincial politics, and were formally abolished in 1946 following World War II.

Province of Hanover

HanoverPrussian Hanover14. Weser-Ems
For example, the Greater Hamburg Act of 1937 transferred some territory from the provinces of Hanover and Schleswig-Holstein to Hamburg while at the same time annexing Hamburgian Geesthacht and the Hanseatic City of Lübeck to Schleswig-Holstein as well as Hamburgian Cuxhaven to the Province of Hanover.
The Province of Hanover (Provinz Hannover) was a province of the Kingdom of Prussia and the Free State of Prussia from 1868 to 1946.

Klaipėda Region

Memel TerritoryMemellandMemel
As specified in the Treaty of Versailles, the former kingdom lost territory to Belgium (Eupen and Malmedy), Denmark (North Schleswig), Lithuania (Memel Territory) and Czechoslovakia (the Hultschin area).

Constructive vote of no confidence

constructiveshould have to include a proposed replacement PMvote of no confidence
This concept, known as the constructive vote of no confidence, was carried over into the Basic Law of the FRG.
While Carlo Schmid is generally considered to be the main contributor to this constitutional innovation, the concept was actually first introduced after World War I in the Free State of Prussia.

Greater Hamburg Act

1937Greater Hamburg LawGroß-Hamburg Gesetz
For example, the Greater Hamburg Act of 1937 transferred some territory from the provinces of Hanover and Schleswig-Holstein to Hamburg while at the same time annexing Hamburgian Geesthacht and the Hanseatic City of Lübeck to Schleswig-Holstein as well as Hamburgian Cuxhaven to the Province of Hanover.
The Greater Hamburg Act (Groß-Hamburg-Gesetz), in full the Law Regarding Greater Hamburg and Other Territorial Readjustments (Gesetz über Groß-Hamburg und andere Gebietsbereinigungen), was passed by the government of Nazi Germany on 26 January 1937, and mandated the exchange of territories between Hamburg and the Free State of Prussia.

Reichsstatthalter

governorImperial GovernorImperial Lieutenant
Two years later, Hitler (who by then was head of state and the absolute dictator of Germany) formally transferred the office of Prussian Reichsstatthalter from himself to Göring.
During the Third Reich, the Nazis created the office of Reichsstatthalter (Reich Governor or Reich Deputy) to gain direct control over all states (other than Prussia) after winning the general elections of 1933.

March 1933 German federal election

1933 Reichstag electionsMarch 1933German federal election, March 1933
Six days after the fire, the Reichstag election of 5 March 1933 strengthened the position of the Nazi Party, although they did not achieve an absolute majority.
In Prussia 50,000 members of the SS, SA and Stahlhelm were ordered to monitor the votes by acting Interior Minister Hermann Göring, as auxiliary police.

Weimar Republic

GermanyWeimar GermanyWeimar
The Free State of Prussia was established in 1918 following the German Revolution, abolishing the German Empire and founding the Weimar Republic in the aftermath of the First World War.

Province of Upper Silesia

Upper SilesiaUpper Silesia ProvinceGerman Upper Silesia
The remainder of province of Silesia that was not ceded to Poland and Czechoslovakia was split into the provinces of Upper Silesia and Lower Silesia in 1919 – although they were temporarily recombined (1938–1941).
The Province of Upper Silesia (Provinz Oberschlesien; Silesian German: Provinz Oberschläsing; ; Prowincja Górny Śląsk) was a province of the Free State of Prussia from 1919 to 1945.

Province of Lower Silesia

Lower SilesiaLowerLower Silesia Province
The remainder of province of Silesia that was not ceded to Poland and Czechoslovakia was split into the provinces of Upper Silesia and Lower Silesia in 1919 – although they were temporarily recombined (1938–1941).
The Province of Lower Silesia (Provinz Niederschlesien; Silesian German: Provinz Niederschläsing; Prowincja Dolny Śląsk; ) was a province of the Free State of Prussia from 1919 to 1945.

Brandenburg

State of BrandenburgBrandenburg, GermanyBB
This development effectively cut off Prussia's western territories from what had been its power base in Brandenburg, thus making the establishment of a credible successor state to the Free State of Prussia all but impossible.
Brandenburg became the Province of Brandenburg in 1815, a province within the kingdom and later within the Free State of Prussia.

Province of Schleswig-Holstein

Schleswig-HolsteinSchleswig-Holstein Province13. Schleswig-Holstein
; North : In the province of Schleswig-Holstein, Allied powers organised two plebiscites in Northern and Central Schleswig on 10 February and 14 March 1920, respectively.
The Province of Schleswig-Holstein (Provinz Schleswig-Holstein ) was a province of the Kingdom of Prussia (subsequently the Free State of Prussia after 1918) from 1868 to 1946.

West Germany

West GermanFederal Republic of GermanyGermany
In reality, Prussia had ceased to exercise administrative functions in 1933 and these had now been absorbed into the administration of the occupying powers in their respective geographic areas of control and its reconstitution was also opposed (if not for the same reasons) by powerful German postwar politicians, especially the first West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer.
At the same time, new federal states (Länder) were formed in the Allied zones; replacing the geography of pre-Nazi German states such as the Free State of Prussia and the Republic of Baden, which had derived ultimately from former independent German kingdoms and principalities.

Province of Brandenburg

BrandenburgBrandenburg ProvinceMark Brandenburg
In 1920, the Greater Berlin Act was passed to create Greater Berlin, enlarging the Prussian capital at the expense of Brandenburg, from which Berlin had been separated in 1881. This amounted to most of Silesia, Eastern Pomerania, the Neumark region of Brandenburg, all of Posen-West Prussia, and the remainder of East Prussia not ceded to Russia.
From 1918, Brandenburg was a province of the Free State of Prussia until it was dissolved in 1945 after World War II, and replaced with reduced territory as the State of Brandenburg in East Germany, which was later dissolved in 1952.

Free State of Oldenburg

OldenburgState of OldenburgFree State
Also Hanoveran Wilhelmshaven was ceded to Oldenburg.
In 1937, it lost the exclave districts of Eutin near the Baltic coast and Birkenfeld in southwestern Germany to Prussia and gained the City of Wilhelmshaven; however, this was a formality, as the Hitler regime had de facto abolished the federal states in 1934.

Posen-West Prussia

Grenzmark Posen-West PrussiaGrenzmark Posen-WestpreußenPosen
The remainder of the provinces of Posen and West Prussia were combined to form Posen-West Prussia in 1922. This amounted to most of Silesia, Eastern Pomerania, the Neumark region of Brandenburg, all of Posen-West Prussia, and the remainder of East Prussia not ceded to Russia.
Posen-West Prussia was established in 1922 as a province of the Free State of Prussia within Weimar Germany, formed from merging three remaining non-contiguous territories of Posen and West Prussia, which had lost the majority of their territory to the Second Polish Republic and Free City of Danzig in the Treaty of Versailles.

Province of Pomerania (1815–1945)

Province of PomeraniaPomeraniaPrussian Province of Pomerania
This amounted to most of Silesia, Eastern Pomerania, the Neumark region of Brandenburg, all of Posen-West Prussia, and the remainder of East Prussia not ceded to Russia.
From 1918, Pomerania was a province of the Free State of Prussia until it was dissolved in 1945 following World War II, and its territory divided between Poland and Allied-occupied Germany.