Free climbing

free climbfreefree climbedfree climberfree climbsfree ascentfree ascentsfree-free-climbedfree-climbing
Free climbing is a form of rock climbing in which the climber may use climbing equipment such as ropes and other means of climbing protection, but only to protect against injury during falls and not to assist progress.wikipedia
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Rock climbing

rock climberrock climbersrock-climbing
Free climbing is a form of rock climbing in which the climber may use climbing equipment such as ropes and other means of climbing protection, but only to protect against injury during falls and not to assist progress.
Today, free climbing, climbing using holds made entirely of natural rock while using gear solely for protection and not for upward movement, is the most popular form of the sport.

Aid climbing

aidaid climbaid-climbing
The term free climbing is used in contrast to aid climbing, in which specific aid climbing equipment is used to assist the climber in ascending the climb.
The term contrasts with free climbing in which progress is made without using artificial aids: a free climber ascends by only holding onto and stepping on natural features of the rock, using rope and equipment merely to catch them in case of fall and provide belay.

Piton

fixed anchorspinspitons
Usually nuts or spring-loaded camming devices (often referred to as "cams" or "friends") are set in cracks in the rock (although pitons are sometimes used).
Pitons are still found in place (as "fixed" pitons) on some established free climbing routes, as fixed belay station anchors, in places where nuts or cams do not work; and are used on some hard aid climbs.

Free solo climbing

free solofree soloingfree solo climber
Confusing free climbing with its subset free soloing, a willfully risk-taking endeavor involving climbing with just one's hands, feet, and body without any rope or protective equipment.
Free solo climbing, also known as soloing, is a form of free climbing and solo climbing where the climber (or free soloist) performs alone and without using any ropes, harnesses or other protective equipment, relying entirely on his or her ability instead.

Climbing protection

protectionprotectbolts
Free climbing is a form of rock climbing in which the climber may use climbing equipment such as ropes and other means of climbing protection, but only to protect against injury during falls and not to assist progress.
Skyhooks are talon shaped hooks placed over very small ledges and flakes and secured to a carabiner. Usually found in aid climbing, they are occasionally utilized in free climbing as extremely marginal protection.

List of first ascents (sport climbing)

first free ascentLa Planta de ShivaNotable first ascents
The hardest route ever ascended by a woman is La Planta de Shiva, graded . Angela Eiter claimed its first female ascent in 2017 and no other woman has been able to repeat it.
In free climbing, a first ascent (FA), or first free ascent (FFA) is the first successful, documented climb of a route or boulder performed without using equipment such as anchors, quickdraws or ropes for aiding progression or resting.

Grade (climbing)

gradeclimbing gradegraded
Ratings on the hardest climbs tend to be speculative, until other climbers have had a chance to complete the routes and a consensus can be reached on the precise grade.
For free climbing, there are many different grading systems varying according to country.

Glossary of climbing terms

on-sightonsightexposure
Climbing a given route on the first try without any advance firsthand knowledge of it (so-called on-sighting).
Free climbing

John Long (climber)

John LongLong, John
*How to Rock Climb, John Long
Long's 1973 ascent of Paisano Overhang (5.12c) at Suicide Rock in Southern California, helped to firmly establish the 5.12 grade and was likely the most technically difficult free climb in the world at that time.

Kernmantle rope

climbing ropekernmantleropes
Free climbing is a form of rock climbing in which the climber may use climbing equipment such as ropes and other means of climbing protection, but only to protect against injury during falls and not to assist progress.

Solo climbing

solosolo climbsolo climber
Free climbing more specifically may include solo climbing, traditional climbing, sport climbing and bouldering.

Traditional climbing

Tradtraditionaltrad climbing
Free climbing more specifically may include solo climbing, traditional climbing, sport climbing and bouldering.

Sport climbing

sport climberclimbingsport climbers
Free climbing more specifically may include solo climbing, traditional climbing, sport climbing and bouldering.

Bouldering

bouldererboulderersboulder
Free climbing more specifically may include solo climbing, traditional climbing, sport climbing and bouldering.

Lead climbing

leadlead climblead climber
In lead climbing, a climber climbs a route from the ground up. For protection against a fall, the lead climber trails a rope which is managed by a belayer who remains on the ground or at an established anchor.

Anchor (climbing)

anchoranchorsanchored
In lead climbing, a climber climbs a route from the ground up. For protection against a fall, the lead climber trails a rope which is managed by a belayer who remains on the ground or at an established anchor.

Figure-eight loop

figure-of-eight loopfigure-eight follow throughfigure eight follow through
The rope is tied into the climber's harness with a figure-of-eight loop or double bowline knot.

Double bowline

The rope is tied into the climber's harness with a figure-of-eight loop or double bowline knot.

Spring-loaded camming device

camcamming devicescams
Usually nuts or spring-loaded camming devices (often referred to as "cams" or "friends") are set in cracks in the rock (although pitons are sometimes used).

Ice screw

In ice climbing the protection is made-up of ice screws or similar devices hammered or screwed into the ice by the leader, and removed by the second climber.

Carabiner

carabinerscarabiner clipkarabiner
The lead climber typically connects the rope to the protection with carabiners or quickdraws.

Belay device

ATCbelay devicesassisted braking
The belayer feeds rope to the lead climber through a belay device, keeping a minimum amount of slack in the system, and keeping themself ready to catch the leader in case of a fall. Some of the more popular types of belay devices are the ATC Belay Device, the Figure 8 and various assisted-braking belay devices such as the Petzl Gri-Gri.

Grigri (climbing)

GrigriPetzl Gri-Gri
Some of the more popular types of belay devices are the ATC Belay Device, the Figure 8 and various assisted-braking belay devices such as the Petzl Gri-Gri.

Multi-pitch climbing

multi-pitchmultipitchpitches
If the route being climbed is a multi-pitch route the leader sets up a secure anchor system at the top of the pitch, also called a belay, from where they can belay as their partner climbs.

Belaying

belaybelayerbelayed
In lead climbing, a climber climbs a route from the ground up. For protection against a fall, the lead climber trails a rope which is managed by a belayer who remains on the ground or at an established anchor. If the route being climbed is a multi-pitch route the leader sets up a secure anchor system at the top of the pitch, also called a belay, from where they can belay as their partner climbs.