Freedom of the press in the United States

freedom of the presspressFirst Amendment rights to protect the confidentiality of his sourcesfreedom of presspress freedomright of news organizations to publish those documents under the First Amendmentthe freedom of the press
Freedom of the press in the United States is legally protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.wikipedia
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Near v. Minnesota

Minnesota Gag LawNear v. Minnesota ex rel. OlsonSaturday Press
The 1931 U.S. Supreme Court decision Near v. Minnesota recognized freedom of the press by roundly rejecting prior restraints on publication, a principle that applied to free speech generally in subsequent jurisprudence.
Near v. Minnesota, 283 U.S. 697 (1931), is a landmark United States Supreme Court decision that found that prior restraints on publication violate freedom of the press as protected under the First Amendment, a principle that was applied to free speech generally in subsequent jurisprudence.

List of amendments to the United States Constitution

amendmentamendmentsconstitutional amendment
It was adopted on December 15, 1791, as one of the ten amendments that constitute the Bill of Rights.

First Amendment to the United States Constitution

First AmendmentFirstU.S. Const. amend. I
Freedom of the press in the United States is legally protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.
The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prevents the government from making laws which regulate an establishment of religion, prohibit the free exercise of religion, or abridge the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the right to peaceably assemble, or the right to petition the government for redress of grievances.

United States Bill of Rights

Bill of RightsU.S. Bill of RightsUS Bill of Rights
It was adopted on December 15, 1791, as one of the ten amendments that constitute the Bill of Rights.
The First Amendment prohibits the making of any law respecting an establishment of religion, impeding the free exercise of religion, abridging the freedom of speech, infringing on the freedom of the press, interfering with the right to peaceably assemble or prohibiting the petitioning for a governmental redress of grievances.

Freedom of the press

press freedompressfreedom of press
The 1931 U.S. Supreme Court decision Near v. Minnesota recognized freedom of the press by roundly rejecting prior restraints on publication, a principle that applied to free speech generally in subsequent jurisprudence. Nevertheless, freedom of the press In the United States is subject to certain restrictions, such as defamation law, a lack of protection for whistleblowers, barriers to information access and constraints caused by public hostility to journalists.

United States defamation law

defamationdefamation lawa defamation suit
Nevertheless, freedom of the press In the United States is subject to certain restrictions, such as defamation law, a lack of protection for whistleblowers, barriers to information access and constraints caused by public hostility to journalists.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
Freedom of the press in the United States is legally protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Whistleblower

whistleblowingwhistleblowerswhistle-blower
Nevertheless, freedom of the press In the United States is subject to certain restrictions, such as defamation law, a lack of protection for whistleblowers, barriers to information access and constraints caused by public hostility to journalists.

Thirteen Colonies

American coloniescoloniescolonial
In the Thirteen Colonies before the signing of the Declaration of Independence, the media was subject to a series of regulations.

United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceAmerican Declaration of IndependenceU.S. Declaration of Independence
In the Thirteen Colonies before the signing of the Declaration of Independence, the media was subject to a series of regulations.

The New York Weekly Journal

New York Weekly JournalNew York Weekly
In a libel case against The New York Weekly Journal publisher John Peter Zenger by British governor William Cosby, Zenger was acquitted and the publication continued until 1751.

John Peter Zenger

Peter ZengerZenger casea journalist
In a libel case against The New York Weekly Journal publisher John Peter Zenger by British governor William Cosby, Zenger was acquitted and the publication continued until 1751.

William Cosby

Sir William Cosby
In a libel case against The New York Weekly Journal publisher John Peter Zenger by British governor William Cosby, Zenger was acquitted and the publication continued until 1751.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
At that time, there were only two newspapers in New York City and the second was not critical of Cosby's government.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
The 1931 U.S. Supreme Court decision Near v. Minnesota recognized freedom of the press by roundly rejecting prior restraints on publication, a principle that applied to free speech generally in subsequent jurisprudence.

Prior restraint

pre-publication censorshipafter content has been shownban a book
The 1931 U.S. Supreme Court decision Near v. Minnesota recognized freedom of the press by roundly rejecting prior restraints on publication, a principle that applied to free speech generally in subsequent jurisprudence.

Freedom of speech

free speechfreedom of expressionfree expression
The 1931 U.S. Supreme Court decision Near v. Minnesota recognized freedom of the press by roundly rejecting prior restraints on publication, a principle that applied to free speech generally in subsequent jurisprudence.

Jurisprudence

Legal Studieslawjuridical
The 1931 U.S. Supreme Court decision Near v. Minnesota recognized freedom of the press by roundly rejecting prior restraints on publication, a principle that applied to free speech generally in subsequent jurisprudence.

Minnesota

MNState of MinnesotaMinnesota, USA
The court ruled that a Minnesota law targeting publishers of malicious or scandalous newspapers violated the First Amendment (as applied through the Fourteenth Amendment).

Malice (law)

malicemaliciousmaliciously
The court ruled that a Minnesota law targeting publishers of malicious or scandalous newspapers violated the First Amendment (as applied through the Fourteenth Amendment).

Scandal

scandalsmedia scandalScandalmongering
The court ruled that a Minnesota law targeting publishers of malicious or scandalous newspapers violated the First Amendment (as applied through the Fourteenth Amendment).

Newspaper

daily newspapernewspapersdaily
The court ruled that a Minnesota law targeting publishers of malicious or scandalous newspapers violated the First Amendment (as applied through the Fourteenth Amendment).

Incorporation of the Bill of Rights

incorporatedincorporationincorporation doctrine
The court ruled that a Minnesota law targeting publishers of malicious or scandalous newspapers violated the First Amendment (as applied through the Fourteenth Amendment).

Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Fourteenth Amendment14th AmendmentFourteenth
The court ruled that a Minnesota law targeting publishers of malicious or scandalous newspapers violated the First Amendment (as applied through the Fourteenth Amendment).