French people

FrenchFrenchmanFrenchmenFrenchwomanFrancothe FrenchFranceFrench descentFrench-born French
For a specific analysis of the population of France, see Demographics of Francewikipedia
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Franks

FrankishFrankFrankish kingdom
Historically the heritage of the French people is mostly of Celtic or Gallic, Latin (Romans) and Germanic (Franks) origin, descending from the ancient and medieval populations of Gauls or Celts from the Atlantic to the Rhone Alps, Germanic tribes that settled France from east of the Rhine and Belgium after the fall of the Roman Empire such as the Franks, Burgundians, Allemanni, Visigoths and Suebi, Latin and Roman tribes such as Ligurians and Gallo-Romans, Norse populations largely settling in Normandy at the beginning of the 10th century and “Bretons” (Celtic Britons) settling in Brittany in Western France.
For example, in 1099, the crusader population of Jerusalem mostly comprised French settlers who, at the time, called themselves Franks, and other Europeans such as Spaniards, Germans and Hungarians.

French Argentines

French ArgentineFrenchArgentina
In addition to mainland France, French people and people of French descent can be found internationally, in overseas departments and territories of France such as the French West Indies (French Caribbean), and in foreign countries with significant French-speaking population groups or not, such as Switzerland (French Swiss), the United States (French Americans), Canada (French Canadians), Argentina (French Argentines), Brazil (French Brazilians), Chile (French Chileans) and Uruguay (French Uruguayans).
French Argentines (Franco-Argentins; franco-argentinos) refers to Argentine citizens of full or partial French ancestry or persons born in France who reside in Argentina.

French Chilean

FrenchFrench-ChileanFrench immigrants in Valparaíso
In addition to mainland France, French people and people of French descent can be found internationally, in overseas departments and territories of France such as the French West Indies (French Caribbean), and in foreign countries with significant French-speaking population groups or not, such as Switzerland (French Swiss), the United States (French Americans), Canada (French Canadians), Argentina (French Argentines), Brazil (French Brazilians), Chile (French Chileans) and Uruguay (French Uruguayans).
A French Chilean (Franco-Chilien, franco-chileno) is a Chilean citizen of full or partial French ancestry.

French Brazilians

French BrazilianFrenchFrench-Brazilian
In addition to mainland France, French people and people of French descent can be found internationally, in overseas departments and territories of France such as the French West Indies (French Caribbean), and in foreign countries with significant French-speaking population groups or not, such as Switzerland (French Swiss), the United States (French Americans), Canada (French Canadians), Argentina (French Argentines), Brazil (French Brazilians), Chile (French Chileans) and Uruguay (French Uruguayans).
French Brazilians (Franco-Brésilien; Franco-brasileiro or Galo-brasileiro) refers to Brazilian citizens of full of partial French ancestry or persons born in France who reside in Brazil.

French Uruguayans

French UruguayanUruguayFrench
In addition to mainland France, French people and people of French descent can be found internationally, in overseas departments and territories of France such as the French West Indies (French Caribbean), and in foreign countries with significant French-speaking population groups or not, such as Switzerland (French Swiss), the United States (French Americans), Canada (French Canadians), Argentina (French Argentines), Brazil (French Brazilians), Chile (French Chileans) and Uruguay (French Uruguayans).
French Uruguayans (Franco-Uruguayen, franco-uruguayo) are Uruguayan citizens of full or partial French ancestry.

Kingdom of Jerusalem

JerusalemKing of JerusalemCrusader
In the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem, founded in 1099, at most 120,000 Franks, who were predominantly French-speaking Western Christians, ruled over 350,000 Muslims, Jews, and native Eastern Christians.
Most of the crusaders who settled there were of French origin.

Afrikaners

AfrikanerAfrikaanerAfrikaner people
Most of these originally settled in the Cape Colony, but have since been quickly absorbed into the Afrikaner population.
In 1688 it sponsored the immigration of 200 French Huguenot refugees forced into exile by the Edict of Fontainebleau.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
Historically the heritage of the French people is mostly of Celtic or Gallic, Latin (Romans) and Germanic (Franks) origin, descending from the ancient and medieval populations of Gauls or Celts from the Atlantic to the Rhone Alps, Germanic tribes that settled France from east of the Rhine and Belgium after the fall of the Roman Empire such as the Franks, Burgundians, Allemanni, Visigoths and Suebi, Latin and Roman tribes such as Ligurians and Gallo-Romans, Norse populations largely settling in Normandy at the beginning of the 10th century and “Bretons” (Celtic Britons) settling in Brittany in Western France. French people (Français) are a Romance-speaking ethnic group and nation who are identified with the country of France.
Most French people are of Celtic (Gauls) origin, with an admixture of Italic (Romans) and Germanic (Franks) groups.

Swiss people

SwissSwiss-GermanSwiss-Italian
In addition to mainland France, French people and people of French descent can be found internationally, in overseas departments and territories of France such as the French West Indies (French Caribbean), and in foreign countries with significant French-speaking population groups or not, such as Switzerland (French Swiss), the United States (French Americans), Canada (French Canadians), Argentina (French Argentines), Brazil (French Brazilians), Chile (French Chileans) and Uruguay (French Uruguayans).

Melting pot

melting-potcommon or universal cultureThe Melting Pot
Modern French society is a melting pot.
Costa Rican people is a very syncretic melting pot, because this country has been constituted in percentage since the 16th century by immigrants from all the European countries—mostly Spaniards and Italians with a lot of Germans, British, Swedes, Swiss, French and Croats—also as black people from Africa and Jamaica, Americans, Chinese, Lebanese and Latin Americans who have mestized over time with the large native populations (criollos, castizos, mulattos, blacks and tri-racial) creating the national average modern ethnic composition.

Tunisia

TUNTunisianRepublic of Tunisia
1.6 million European pieds noirs settlers migrated from Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco.
Under French colonization, European settlements in the country were actively encouraged; the number of French colonists grew from 34,000 in 1906 to 144,000 in 1945.

New France

FrenchCanadaNouvelle-France
After Champlain's founding of Quebec City in 1608, it became the capital of New France.
The French were interested in exploiting the land through the fur trade as well as the timber trade later on.

Nation state

nation-statecountrynation-states
A nation-state is not composed of a single homogeneous ethnic group (a community), but of a variety of individuals willing to live together.
In France, Eric Hobsbawm argues, the French state preceded the formation of the French people.

Arabs

ArabArab peopleArabian
The large impact of North African and Arab immigration is the greatest and has brought racial, socio-cultural and religious questions to a country seen as homogenously European, French and Christian for thousands of years.
Arabs in France form the second largest ethnic group after ethnically French people.

Haplogroup I-M170

Ihaplogroup IHaplogroup I (Y-DNA)
Haplogroups I and G are also characteristic markers for many different West European populations.
There are also high frequencies of Haplogroup I* among the Andalusians (3/103), French (4/179), Slovenians (2/55), Tabassarans (1/30), and Saami (1/35).

Americas

Americathe AmericasAmerican
Unlike elsewhere in Europe, France experienced relatively low levels of emigration to the Americas, with the exception of the Huguenots, due to a lower birthrate than in the rest of Europe.

Latin America

Latin AmericanLatin-AmericaCentral and South America
A small French descent group also subsequently arrived from Latin America (Argentina, Chile and Uruguay) in the 1970s.

Morocco

MoroccanSultanate of MoroccoKingdom of Morocco
1.6 million European pieds noirs settlers migrated from Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco.
Of these foreign-born residents, most were of French origin, followed by individuals mainly from various nations in West Africa and Algeria.

Madagascar

MalagasyMadagascanMalagasy politician
It is estimated that 20,000 settlers were living in Saigon in 1945, and there were 68,430 European settlers living in Madagascar in 1958.
Chinese, Indian and Comoran minorities are present in Madagascar, as well as a small European (primarily French) populace.

Chilean wine

ChilewineChilean
The French came to Chile in the 18th century, arriving at Concepción as merchants, and in the mid-19th century to cultivate vines in the haciendas of the Central Valley, the homebase of world-famous Chilean wine.
A large number of French people immigrated to Chile during the late 20th century, bringing more vinicultural knowledge to the country.

Huguenots

HuguenotFrench HuguenotHugenot
Unlike elsewhere in Europe, France experienced relatively low levels of emigration to the Americas, with the exception of the Huguenots, due to a lower birthrate than in the rest of Europe.
Huguenots (, also, ) were a religious group of French Protestants.

Germanic peoples

GermanicGermanic tribesGermanic tribe
Historically the heritage of the French people is mostly of Celtic or Gallic, Latin (Romans) and Germanic (Franks) origin, descending from the ancient and medieval populations of Gauls or Celts from the Atlantic to the Rhone Alps, Germanic tribes that settled France from east of the Rhine and Belgium after the fall of the Roman Empire such as the Franks, Burgundians, Allemanni, Visigoths and Suebi, Latin and Roman tribes such as Ligurians and Gallo-Romans, Norse populations largely settling in Normandy at the beginning of the 10th century and “Bretons” (Celtic Britons) settling in Brittany in Western France.
Burgundians and Lombards were assimilated into both Latin (French and Italian) and Germanic (German-speaking Swiss) populations.

Racism

racistracial prejudiceracial discrimination
However, this universal ideal, rooted in the 1789 French Revolution ("bringing liberty to the people"), suffered from the racism that impregnated colonialism.
Indeed, to him the first three were all "internal foreigners", who threatened the ethnic unity of the French people.

French nationality law

FrenchFrench citizenshipFrench citizen
Application for French citizenship is often interpreted as a renunciation of previous state allegiance unless a dual citizenship agreement exists between the two countries (for instance, this is the case with Switzerland: one can be both French and Swiss).
For that reason, French identity must not necessarily be associated with the "ethnic French people" but can be associated with either a nationality and citizenship, or a culture and language-based group.

Midwestern United States

MidwestMidwesternAmerican Midwest
The United States is home to an estimated 13 to 16 million people of French descent, or 4 to 5 percent of the US population, particularly in Louisiana, New England and parts of the Midwest.
European settlement of the area began in the 17th century following French exploration of the region and became known as New France.