Fruit

fruitsseed podfruitingseed podsfresh fruitpodsaggregatefreshFresh Fruitsaggregate fruits
In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) formed from the ovary after flowering.wikipedia
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Flowering plant

Angiospermsflowering plantsangiosperm
In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) formed from the ovary after flowering.
However, they are distinguished from gymnosperms by characteristics including flowers, endosperm within the seeds, and the production of fruits that contain the seeds.

Pomegranate

pomegranatesdalimbpomegranate flower
Accordingly, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world's agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.
The pomegranate (Punica granatum) is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub in the family Lythraceae that grows between 5 and 10 m tall.

Banana

bananasbanana treebanana flower
In common language usage, "fruit" normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures of a plant that are sweet or sour, and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries.
A banana is an edible fruit – botanically a berry – produced by several kinds of large herbaceous flowering plants in the genus Musa.

Seed

seedsseed coatkernel
In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) formed from the ovary after flowering. On the other hand, in botanical usage, "fruit" includes many structures that are not commonly called "fruits", such as bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains.
Many structures commonly referred to as "seeds" are actually dry fruits.

Strawberry

strawberriesgarden strawberryFragaria'' × ''ananassa
In common language usage, "fruit" normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures of a plant that are sweet or sour, and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries.
It is cultivated worldwide for its fruit.

Maize

corncorn (maize)Zea mays
On the other hand, in botanical usage, "fruit" includes many structures that are not commonly called "fruits", such as bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains. Examples of culinary "vegetables" and nuts that are botanically fruit include corn, cucurbits (e.g., cucumber, pumpkin, and squash), eggplant, legumes (beans, peanuts, and peas), sweet pepper, and tomato. Botanically, a cereal grain, such as corn, rice, or wheat, is also a kind of fruit, termed a caryopsis.
The leafy stalk of the plant produces pollen inflorescences and separate ovuliferous inflorescences called ears that yield kernels or seeds, which are fruits.

Agriculture

farmingagriculturalagriculturist
Accordingly, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world's agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings.
Classes of foods include cereals (grains), vegetables, fruits, oils, meat, milk, fungi and eggs.

List of culinary fruits

tropical fruittropical fruitsculinary fruits
In culinary terminology, a fruit is usually any sweet-tasting plant part, especially a botanical fruit; a nut is any hard, oily, and shelled plant product; and a vegetable is any savory or less sweet plant product.
This list of culinary fruits contains the names of some fruits that are considered edible in some cuisines.

Tomato

tomatoestomato plantgreen tomato
On the other hand, in botanical usage, "fruit" includes many structures that are not commonly called "fruits", such as bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains. Examples of culinary "vegetables" and nuts that are botanically fruit include corn, cucurbits (e.g., cucumber, pumpkin, and squash), eggplant, legumes (beans, peanuts, and peas), sweet pepper, and tomato.
While tomatoes are fruits — botanically classified as berries — they are commonly used as a vegetable ingredient or side dish.

Vegetable

vegetablessalad vegetablewild vegetables
In culinary terminology, a fruit is usually any sweet-tasting plant part, especially a botanical fruit; a nut is any hard, oily, and shelled plant product; and a vegetable is any savory or less sweet plant product.
The original meaning is still commonly used and is applied to plants collectively to refer to all edible plant matter, including the flowers, fruits, stems, leaves, roots, and seeds.

Nut (fruit)

nutsnutnutlet
However, in botany, a fruit is the ripened ovary or carpel that contains seeds, a nut is a type of fruit and not a seed, and a seed is a ripened ovule.
A nut is a fruit composed of an inedible hard shell and a seed, which is generally edible.

Wheat

cornTriticumdwarf wheat
On the other hand, in botanical usage, "fruit" includes many structures that are not commonly called "fruits", such as bean pods, corn kernels, tomatoes, and wheat grains. Botanically, a cereal grain, such as corn, rice, or wheat, is also a kind of fruit, termed a caryopsis.
Botanically, the wheat kernel is a type of fruit called a caryopsis.

Pea

peasgreen peasgreen pea
Examples of culinary "vegetables" and nuts that are botanically fruit include corn, cucurbits (e.g., cucumber, pumpkin, and squash), eggplant, legumes (beans, peanuts, and peas), sweet pepper, and tomato.
The pea is most commonly the small spherical seed or the seed-pod of the pod fruit Pisum sativum. Each pod contains several peas, which can be green or yellow.

Spice

spicesspicyspicy food
In addition, some spices, such as allspice and chili pepper, are fruits, botanically speaking.
A spice is a seed, fruit, root, bark, or other plant substance primarily used for flavoring, coloring or preserving food.

Allspice

All Spiceallspice, bay leafPimenta dioica
In addition, some spices, such as allspice and chili pepper, are fruits, botanically speaking.
Allspice, also called pimenta, Jamaica pimenta, or myrtle pepper, is the dried unripe fruit (berries, used as a spice) of Pimenta dioica, a midcanopy tree native to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America, now cultivated in many warm parts of the world.

Grape

grapeswine grapewhite grape
In common language usage, "fruit" normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures of a plant that are sweet or sour, and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries.
Grapes are a type of fruit that grow in clusters of 15 to 300, and can be crimson, black, dark blue, yellow, green, orange, and pink.

Peanut

groundnutgroundnutspeanuts
Examples of culinary "vegetables" and nuts that are botanically fruit include corn, cucurbits (e.g., cucumber, pumpkin, and squash), eggplant, legumes (beans, peanuts, and peas), sweet pepper, and tomato.
The botanical definition of a "nut" is a fruit whose ovary wall becomes hard at maturity.

Cereal

graincerealsgrains
Botanically, a cereal grain, such as corn, rice, or wheat, is also a kind of fruit, termed a caryopsis.
A cereal is any of the edible components of the grain (botanically, a type of fruit, called a caryopsis) of cultivated grass, composed of the endosperm, germ, and bran.

Legume

pulseslegumesleguminous
Examples of culinary "vegetables" and nuts that are botanically fruit include corn, cucurbits (e.g., cucumber, pumpkin, and squash), eggplant, legumes (beans, peanuts, and peas), sweet pepper, and tomato.
A legume fruit is a simple dry fruit that develops from a simple carpel and usually dehisces (opens along a seam) on two sides.

Rhubarb

Rheumgarden rhubarbR. rhabarbarum
In contrast, rhubarb is often referred to as a fruit, because it is used to make sweet desserts such as pies, though only the petiole (leaf stalk) of the rhubarb plant is edible, and edible gymnosperm seeds are often given fruit names, e.g., ginkgo nuts and pine nuts.
Although rhubarb is a vegetable, it is often put to the same culinary uses as fruits.

Drupe

stone fruitdrupesdrupaceous
As the ovules develop into seeds, the ovary begins to ripen and the ovary wall, the pericarp, may become fleshy (as in berries or drupes), or form a hard outer covering (as in nuts).
In botany, a drupe (or stone fruit) is an indehiscent fruit in which an outer fleshy part (exocarp, or skin; and mesocarp, or flesh) surrounds a single shell (the pit, stone, or pyrene) of hardened endocarp with a seed (kernel) inside.

Caryopsis

caryopsesgrainscaryopes
Botanically, a cereal grain, such as corn, rice, or wheat, is also a kind of fruit, termed a caryopsis.
In botany, a caryopsis (plural caryopses) is a type of simple dry fruit—one that is monocarpellate (formed from a single carpel) and indehiscent (not opening at maturity) and resembles an achene, except that in a caryopsis the pericarp is fused with the thin seed coat.

Accessory fruit

anthocarpfalse fruitaccessory
When such other floral parts are a significant part of the fruit, it is called an accessory fruit.
An accessory fruit (sometimes called false fruit, spurious fruit, pseudofruit, or pseudocarp) is a fruit in which some of the flesh is derived not from the ovary but from some adjacent tissue exterior to the carpel.

Gynoecium

pistilcarpelstyle
A fruit results from maturation of one or more flowers, and the gynoecium of the flower(s) forms all or part of the fruit.
Gynoecium (, from Ancient Greek γυνή, gyne, meaning woman, and οἶκος, oikos, meaning house) is most commonly used as a collective term for the parts of a flower that produce ovules and ultimately develop into the fruit and seeds.

Pome

pomaceouspome fruitpomaceous fruit
The pome fruits of the family Rosaceae, (including apples, pears, rosehips, and saskatoon berry) are a syncarpous fleshy fruit, a simple fruit, developing from a half-inferior ovary.
In botany, a pome (derived from Latin pōmum, meaning "fruit") is a type of fruit produced by flowering plants in the subtribe Malinae of the family Rosaceae.