Fufu

DumboyfoofoofoufouAchufou fouFoutoufu-fuFufuowater-fufu
Fufu (or foofoo, fufuo, foufou) is a staple food common in many countries in West Africa and Central Africa such as Cote D'Ivoire, Sierra Leone, Ghana, Liberia, Benin, Togo, Nigeria and both Congos.wikipedia
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Cooking banana

plantainplantainscooking plantain
It is often made in the traditional Ghanaian and Nigerian method by mixing and pounding separate equal portions of cassava and green plantain flour thoroughly with water. The traditional method is to boil starchy food crops like cassava, yams or plantains and cocoyams and then pound them into a dough-like consistency.
Mofongo originating from Puerto Rico, and essentially akin to the Cuban fufu, mofongo is made by mashing fried plantains in a mortar with chicharrón or bacon, garlic, olive oil and stock.

West Africa

West AfricanWestWestern Africa
Fufu (or foofoo, fufuo, foufou) is a staple food common in many countries in West Africa and Central Africa such as Cote D'Ivoire, Sierra Leone, Ghana, Liberia, Benin, Togo, Nigeria and both Congos.
Fufu (from the Twi language, a dough served with a spicy stew or sauce for example okra stew etc.) from Ghana is enjoyed throughout the region and beyond even in Central Africa with their own versions of it.

Semolina

soojiravasuji
Other flours, such as semolina, maize flour or mashed plantains may take the place of cassava flour.
It is prepared just like eba (cassava flour) or fufu with water and boiled for 5 to 10 minutes.

Ghana

GhanaianRepublic of GhanaGHA
It is often made in the traditional Ghanaian and Nigerian method by mixing and pounding separate equal portions of cassava and green plantain flour thoroughly with water. Fufu (or foofoo, fufuo, foufou) is a staple food common in many countries in West Africa and Central Africa such as Cote D'Ivoire, Sierra Leone, Ghana, Liberia, Benin, Togo, Nigeria and both Congos.
Fufu is the most common exported Ghanaian dish in that it is a delicacy across the African diaspora.

Abunuabunu

Fufu is often served with groundnut soup, palm nut soup, abunuabunu or light soup.
It is mostly served with fufu or banku but it can be equally served with anything of your choice.

Staple food

staplestaplesstaple crop
Fufu (or foofoo, fufuo, foufou) is a staple food common in many countries in West Africa and Central Africa such as Cote D'Ivoire, Sierra Leone, Ghana, Liberia, Benin, Togo, Nigeria and both Congos.
Root vegetables can be mashed and used to make porridge-like dishes such as poi and fufu.

Mofongo

In Cuba, the dish retains its original African stem name, termed simply as fufú or with added descriptive extensions like fufú de platano or fufú de platano pintón. On other major islands, fufú goes by the names of mangú in the Dominican Republic, mofongo in Puerto Rico and bammy in Jamaica.
Mofongo's roots lead to the western African Fufu mainly, mixed with some Spanish and Taíno influences.

Yam (vegetable)

yamyamsñame
The traditional method is to boil starchy food crops like cassava, yams or plantains and cocoyams and then pound them into a dough-like consistency. Ivorian “foufou” is specifically sweet mashed bananas, whereas the “foutou” is a stronger, heavier pasta made of various staple foods such as yam, cassava, banana, taro or a mix of any of those.
The boiled yam can also be pounded with a traditional mortar and pestle to create a thick, starchy paste known as iyan (pounded yam) or fufu which is eaten with traditional sauces such as egusi and palm nut soup.

Liberia

Republic of LiberiaLBRLiberian
Fufu (or foofoo, fufuo, foufou) is a staple food common in many countries in West Africa and Central Africa such as Cote D'Ivoire, Sierra Leone, Ghana, Liberia, Benin, Togo, Nigeria and both Congos.
Heavy stews spiced with habanero and scotch bonnet chillies are popular and eaten with fufu.

Cuisine of Guinea

Guinean cuisine
Today, it also features in Togolese cuisine, Guinean cuisine, Cameroonian cuisine, as well as Nigerian cuisine.
Guinean cuisine includes the traditional dishes of fou fou, boiled mango, fried plantains, patates and pumpkin pie.

Cassava

maniocyucaManihot esculenta
It is often made in the traditional Ghanaian and Nigerian method by mixing and pounding separate equal portions of cassava and green plantain flour thoroughly with water. The traditional method is to boil starchy food crops like cassava, yams or plantains and cocoyams and then pound them into a dough-like consistency. Ivorian “foufou” is specifically sweet mashed bananas, whereas the “foutou” is a stronger, heavier pasta made of various staple foods such as yam, cassava, banana, taro or a mix of any of those.

Taro

Colocasia esculentacocoyamtaro root
Ivorian “foufou” is specifically sweet mashed bananas, whereas the “foutou” is a stronger, heavier pasta made of various staple foods such as yam, cassava, banana, taro or a mix of any of those.
In Ghana, it substitutes for plantain in making fufu when plantains are out of season.

Cornmeal

corn mealcorn flourmaize meal
In Antigua, fufu is served as part of the national dish but is called fungi/fungee and is made using cornmeal and okra.

African cuisine

AfricanAfricaAfrican food
Fufu-like starchy foods are usually made from fermented cassava roots, but they can also be made with plantain, corn maize and yam.

Mangú

Mangú (dish)
In Cuba, the dish retains its original African stem name, termed simply as fufú or with added descriptive extensions like fufú de platano or fufú de platano pintón. On other major islands, fufú goes by the names of mangú in the Dominican Republic, mofongo in Puerto Rico and bammy in Jamaica.

Fufu machine

With the invention of the fufu machine preparation has become much less labour-intensive.
Fufu is a popular staple food in West and Central Africa made out of cassava, plantains or yams.

Nigerian cuisine

NigerianCuisine of NigeriaNigeria
Today, it also features in Togolese cuisine, Guinean cuisine, Cameroonian cuisine, as well as Nigerian cuisine.

Cameroonian cuisine

Cuisine of CameroonCameroonCuisine
Today, it also features in Togolese cuisine, Guinean cuisine, Cameroonian cuisine, as well as Nigerian cuisine.

Togolese cuisine

TogoCuisine of Togo
Today, it also features in Togolese cuisine, Guinean cuisine, Cameroonian cuisine, as well as Nigerian cuisine.

Congolese cuisine

Cuisine of the Democratic Republic of the CongoDemocratic Republic of the Congo cuisineCongo
The starch can come in the form of a paste or mash made of cassava or corn flour, called fufu or ugali.

Peanut soup

Ground nut soupgroundnut souppeanut butter soup
Fufu is often served with groundnut soup, palm nut soup, abunuabunu or light soup.
In Ghana it is often eaten with fufu.

Plakali

It consists of cassava dough cooked in hot water, and it is similar to banku, another Ghanaian staple food, and fufu.