G-type main-sequence star

yellow dwarfG-type main sequence starG-type main sequenceGyellow main-sequencedwarfG-typeG0V staryellowClass G
A G-type main-sequence star (Spectral type: G-V), often (and imprecisely) called a yellow dwarf, or G dwarf star, is a main-sequence star (luminosity class V) of spectral type G.wikipedia
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Sun

solarSolThe Sun
The Sun, the star to which the Earth is gravitationally bound in the Solar System and the object with the largest apparent magnitude, is an example of a G-type main-sequence star (G2V type). beta CVn (G0V), the Sun (G2V), Kappa1 Ceti (G5V), 61 Ursae Majoris (G8V). Some of the nearest G-type stars known to have planets include the Sun, 61 Virginis, HD 102365, HD 147513, 47 Ursae Majoris, Mu Arae, and Tau Ceti
The Sun is a G-type main-sequence star (G2V) based on its spectral class.

Main sequence

main-sequencemain-sequence starmain sequence dwarf
A G-type main-sequence star (Spectral type: G-V), often (and imprecisely) called a yellow dwarf, or G dwarf star, is a main-sequence star (luminosity class V) of spectral type G. Such a star has about 0.84 to 1.15 solar masses and surface temperature of between 5,300 and 6,000 K.
For the cooler stars, dwarfs such as red dwarfs, orange dwarfs, and yellow dwarfs are indeed much smaller and dimmer than other stars of those colors.

Solar System

outer Solar Systeminner Solar Systemouter planets
The Sun, the star to which the Earth is gravitationally bound in the Solar System and the object with the largest apparent magnitude, is an example of a G-type main-sequence star (G2V type).
The principal component of the Solar System is the Sun, a G2 main-sequence star that contains 99.86% of the system's known mass and dominates it gravitationally.

Alpha Centauri

Alpha Centauri BAlpha Centauri Aα Centauri
Besides the Sun, other well-known examples of G-type main-sequence stars include Alpha Centauri A, Tau Ceti, and 51 Pegasi.
Alpha Centauri A and B are Sun-like stars (Class G and K), and together they form the binary star Alpha Centauri AB.

Tau Ceti

Tau Ceti eτ CetTau Ceti f
Besides the Sun, other well-known examples of G-type main-sequence stars include Alpha Centauri A, Tau Ceti, and 51 Pegasi. Some of the nearest G-type stars known to have planets include the Sun, 61 Virginis, HD 102365, HD 147513, 47 Ursae Majoris, Mu Arae, and Tau Ceti
At a distance of just under 12 ly from the Solar System, it is a relatively nearby star and the closest solitary G-class star.

Beta Canum Venaticorum

β CVnCharaa star in the constellation ''Canes Venatici
beta CVn (G0V), the Sun (G2V), Kappa1 Ceti (G5V), 61 Ursae Majoris (G8V).
Beta Canum Venaticorum (β Canum Venaticorum, abbreviated Beta CVn, β CVn), also named Chara, is a G-type main-sequence star in the northern constellation of Canes Venatici.

Kappa1 Ceti

κ 1 Cetiκ 1 CetKappa 1 Ceti
beta CVn (G0V), the Sun (G2V), Kappa1 Ceti (G5V), 61 Ursae Majoris (G8V).
Kappa 1 Ceti (κ 1 Cet, κ 1 Ceti) is a yellow dwarf star approximately 30 light-years away in the equatorial constellation of Cetus.

61 Ursae Majoris

61 UMa
beta CVn (G0V), the Sun (G2V), Kappa1 Ceti (G5V), 61 Ursae Majoris (G8V).
61 Ursae Majoris (61 UMa) is an orange-yellow G8 main-sequence star in the constellation Ursa Major.

61 Virginis

61 Vir
Some of the nearest G-type stars known to have planets include the Sun, 61 Virginis, HD 102365, HD 147513, 47 Ursae Majoris, Mu Arae, and Tau Ceti
61 Virginis (abbreviated 61 Vir) is the Flamsteed designation of a G-type main-sequence star (G7V) slightly less massive than the Sun (which is G2V), located about 27.9 light-years away in the constellation of Virgo.

16 Cygni

16 Cyg A16 Cygni B16 Cyg
Other primary MK standard stars include HD 115043 (G1V) and 16 Cygni B (G3V).
It consists of two Sun-like yellow dwarf stars, 16 Cygni A and 16 Cygni B, together with a red dwarf, 16 Cygni C. In 1996 an extrasolar planet was discovered in an eccentric orbit around 16 Cygni B.

Dwarf star

dwarfDSDwarf star (disambiguation)
The revised Yerkes Atlas system (Johnson & Morgan 1953) listed 11 G-type dwarf spectral standard stars; however, not all of these still conform to this designation.

47 Ursae Majoris

47 UMa47 UMa (Chalawan)HD 95128
Some of the nearest G-type stars known to have planets include the Sun, 61 Virginis, HD 102365, HD 147513, 47 Ursae Majoris, Mu Arae, and Tau Ceti
47 Ursae Majoris (abbreviated 47 UMa), formally named Chalawan, is a yellow dwarf star approximately 46 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Ursa Major.

Mu Arae

μ Araμ Arae
Some of the nearest G-type stars known to have planets include the Sun, 61 Virginis, HD 102365, HD 147513, 47 Ursae Majoris, Mu Arae, and Tau Ceti
Mu Arae (μ Arae, abbreviated Mu Ara, μ Ara), often designated HD 160691, officially named Cervantes, is a main sequence G-type star approximately 50 light-years away from the Sun in the constellation of Ara.

K-type main-sequence star

orange dwarfK-type main sequence starK
In addition, although the term "dwarf" is used to contrast yellow main-sequence stars from giant stars, yellow dwarfs like the Sun outshine 90% of the stars in the Milky Way (which are largely much dimmer orange dwarfs, red dwarfs, and white dwarfs, the last being a stellar remnant).
A K-type main-sequence star, also referred to as a K dwarf or Orange dwarf, is a main-sequence (hydrogen-burning) star of spectral type K and luminosity class V. These stars are intermediate in size between red M-type main-sequence stars ("red dwarfs") and yellow G-type main-sequence stars.

Star

starsstellarmassive star
A G-type main-sequence star (Spectral type: G-V), often (and imprecisely) called a yellow dwarf, or G dwarf star, is a main-sequence star (luminosity class V) of spectral type G. Such a star has about 0.84 to 1.15 solar masses and surface temperature of between 5,300 and 6,000 K.

Solar mass

mass of the SunSun's masssolar masses
A G-type main-sequence star (Spectral type: G-V), often (and imprecisely) called a yellow dwarf, or G dwarf star, is a main-sequence star (luminosity class V) of spectral type G. Such a star has about 0.84 to 1.15 solar masses and surface temperature of between 5,300 and 6,000 K.

Effective temperature

surface temperatureeffective (surface) temperaturetemperature
A G-type main-sequence star (Spectral type: G-V), often (and imprecisely) called a yellow dwarf, or G dwarf star, is a main-sequence star (luminosity class V) of spectral type G. Such a star has about 0.84 to 1.15 solar masses and surface temperature of between 5,300 and 6,000 K.

Kelvin

KkelvinsKelvin scale
A G-type main-sequence star (Spectral type: G-V), often (and imprecisely) called a yellow dwarf, or G dwarf star, is a main-sequence star (luminosity class V) of spectral type G. Such a star has about 0.84 to 1.15 solar masses and surface temperature of between 5,300 and 6,000 K.

Chemical element

elementelementschemical elements
Like other main-sequence stars, a G-type main-sequence star is converting the element hydrogen to helium in its core by means of nuclear fusion.

Hydrogen

HH 2 hydrogen gas
Like other main-sequence stars, a G-type main-sequence star is converting the element hydrogen to helium in its core by means of nuclear fusion.

Helium

Hehelium IIsuperfluid helium
Like other main-sequence stars, a G-type main-sequence star is converting the element hydrogen to helium in its core by means of nuclear fusion.

Nuclear fusion

fusionhydrogen fusionfusion reaction
Like other main-sequence stars, a G-type main-sequence star is converting the element hydrogen to helium in its core by means of nuclear fusion.

Apparent magnitude

apparent visual magnitudemagnitudevisual magnitude
The Sun, the star to which the Earth is gravitationally bound in the Solar System and the object with the largest apparent magnitude, is an example of a G-type main-sequence star (G2V type).

Ton

tonstdisplacement ton
Each second, the Sun fuses approximately 600 million tons of hydrogen to helium, converting about 4 million tons of matter to energy.