GE-600 series

GE 635GE-645GE-635GE 645600-seriesGE 600GE 625GE 655GE-600GE-615
The GE-600 series was a family of 36-bit mainframe computers originating in the 1960s, built by General Electric (GE).wikipedia
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General Electric

GEGeneral Electric CompanyGeneral Electric Co.
The GE-600 series was a family of 36-bit mainframe computers originating in the 1960s, built by General Electric (GE).
GE had a line of general purpose and special purpose computers, including the GE 200, GE 400, and GE 600 series general purpose computers, the GE 4010, GE 4020, and GE 4060 real-time process control computers, and the DATANET-30 and Datanet 355 message switching computers (DATANET-30 and 355 were also used as front end processors for GE mainframe computers).

36-bit

36-bit word36 bit words36 bits
The GE-600 series was a family of 36-bit mainframe computers originating in the 1960s, built by General Electric (GE).
Computers with 36-bit words included the MIT Lincoln Laboratory TX-2, the IBM 701/704/709/7090/7094, the UNIVAC 1103/1103A/1105 and 1100/2200 series, the General Electric GE-600/Honeywell 6000, the Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-6/PDP-10 (as used in the DECsystem-10/DECSYSTEM-20), and the Symbolics 3600 series.

Dartmouth Time Sharing System

Dartmouth Time-Sharing SystemDTSSDartmouth College Timesharing System
The system is perhaps best known as the platform on which the Dartmouth Time Sharing System (DTSS) spent most of its life, and the base machine for the Multics operating system as well.
From 1966-1968, DTSS was reimplemented on the GE 635, still using the DATANET-30 for terminal control.

Multics

Multics operating systemMultics project
The system is perhaps best known as the platform on which the Dartmouth Time Sharing System (DTSS) spent most of its life, and the base machine for the Multics operating system as well.
In 1964, Multics was developed initially for the GE-645 mainframe, a 36-bit system.

General Comprehensive Operating System

GECOSGCOSGeneral Electric Comprehensive Operating Supervisor
Originally the operating system for the 600-series computers was GECOS, developed by GE beginning in 1962.
The GECOS-II operating system was developed by General Electric for the 36-bit GE-635 in 1962-1964.

Virtual memory

virtual storagememoryswap
Multics was supported by virtual memory additions made to later versions of the series.

Symmetric multiprocessing

SMPsymmetric multiprocessorD825" modular data processing system
The 635 was likely the first example of a general purpose SMP system, though the GECOS/GCOS software treated the processors as a master and up to three slaves.
Other mainframes that supported SMP included the UNIVAC 1108 II, released in 1965, which supported up to three CPUs, and the GE-635 and GE-645, although GECOS on multiprocessor GE-635 systems ran in a master-slave asymmetric fashion, unlike Multics on multiprocessor GE-645 systems, which ran in a symmetric fashion.

Honeywell 6000 series

Honeywell 6180Honeywell 6000H-6000
GE sold its computer division to Honeywell in 1970, who renamed the GE-600 series as the Honeywell 6000 series.
The Honeywell 6000 series computers were rebadged versions of General Electric's 600-series mainframes manufactured by Honeywell International, Inc. from 1970 to 1989.

MISTRAM

The GE-600 line of computers was developed by a team led by John Couleur out of work they had done for the military MISTRAM project in 1959.
(According to Dr. Neelands, certain military people involved in the project were adamant about not relying on "computers", therefore this "information processor" was developed.) This high speed 36-bit minicomputer was developed by the GE Heavy Military Electronics Department (HMED) in Syracuse, New York, eventually leading to the GE-600 series of mainframe computers.

John Couleur

The GE-600 line of computers was developed by a team led by John Couleur out of work they had done for the military MISTRAM project in 1959.
Later at GE, he was responsible for the development of the GE-635 computer system.

GE-400 series

GE 400GE 400-seriesGE-400
The 400 series was succeeded by the incompatible 36-bit GE-600 series.

Mainframe computer

mainframemainframesmainframe computers
The GE-600 series was a family of 36-bit mainframe computers originating in the 1960s, built by General Electric (GE).

Computer

computerscomputer systemdigital computer
The GE-600 series was a family of 36-bit mainframe computers originating in the 1960s, built by General Electric (GE).

Honeywell

Honeywell InternationalHoneywell CorporationHoneywell, Inc.
GE sold its computer division to Honeywell in 1970, who renamed the GE-600 series as the Honeywell 6000 series. When GE left the mainframe business the line was sold to Honeywell, which built similar systems into the 1990s as the division moved to Groupe Bull and then NEC.

Groupe Bull

BullAmesysBull SA
When GE left the mainframe business the line was sold to Honeywell, which built similar systems into the 1990s as the division moved to Groupe Bull and then NEC.

NEC

NEC CorporationNEC Home ElectronicsNEC Avenue
When GE left the mainframe business the line was sold to Honeywell, which built similar systems into the 1990s as the division moved to Groupe Bull and then NEC.

Operating system

operating systemsOScomputer operating system
The system is perhaps best known as the platform on which the Dartmouth Time Sharing System (DTSS) spent most of its life, and the base machine for the Multics operating system as well.

Accumulator (computing)

accumulatoraccumulatorsaccumulator machine
They had two 36-bit accumulators, eight 18-bit index registers, and one 8-bit exponent register.

Index register

index registersIndexindex (B) registers
They had two 36-bit accumulators, eight 18-bit index registers, and one 8-bit exponent register.

Floating-point arithmetic

floating pointfloating-pointfloating-point number
It supported floating point in both 36-bit single-precision and 2 x 36-bit double precision, the exponent being stored separately, allowing up to 71 bits of precision (one bit being used for the sign).

Indirection

dereferenceIndirectaccess through a pointer
It had an elaborate set of addressing modes, many of which used indirect words, some of which were auto-incrementing or auto-decrementing.

Byte

bytesBTB
It supported 6-bit and 9-bit bytes through addressing modes; these supported extracting specific bytes, and incrementing the byte pointer, but not random access to bytes.

Channel I/O

channelchannel controllerchannels
It also included a number of channel controllers for handling I/O.

Input/output

I/Ooutputinterface
It also included a number of channel controllers for handling I/O.