GIUK gap

gapGIUKGreenland-Iceland-UK gapGreenland–Iceland–United Kingdom (GIUK) gapAir GapFaeroes GapGIUK barrierGreenland, Iceland, United Kingdom gapGreenland-Iceland-UK (GIUK) gapGreenland-Iceland-United Kingdom (GIUK) gap
The GIUK gap is an area in the northern Atlantic Ocean that forms a naval choke point.wikipedia
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Royal Navy

RNBritish NavyBritish Royal Navy
The GIUK gap is particularly important to the Royal Navy, as any attempt by northern European forces to break into the open Atlantic would have to be made either through the heavily defended English Channel, one of the world's busiest seaways, or through one of the exits on either side of Iceland.
During the Cold War, the Royal Navy transformed into a primarily anti-submarine force, hunting for Soviet submarines and mostly active in the GIUK gap.

SOSUS

Sound Surveillance SystemIntegrated Undersea Surveillance SystemEquatorial Pacific Ocean autonomous hydrophone array
The United States and Britain based much of their post-war naval strategy on blocking the gap, installing a chain of underwater listening posts right across it during the 1950s – an example of a SOSUS "sound surveillance system".
SOSUS, an acronym for sound surveillance system, is a chain of underwater listening posts located around the world in places such as the Atlantic Ocean near Greenland, Iceland and the United Kingdom—the GIUK gap—and at various locations in the Pacific Ocean.

Choke point

bottleneckchokepointchoke points
The GIUK gap is an area in the northern Atlantic Ocean that forms a naval choke point.

Battle of the Denmark Strait

Battle of Denmark StraitBismarckAftermath
The two German ships were expected to sail westward and break through the Greenland-Iceland-UK (GIUK) gap.

Anti-submarine warfare

ASWanti-submarineantisubmarine warfare
This gap was an area that land-based aircraft could not reach and where, as a result, they could not carry out their anti-submarine duties.
A system like this SOSUS was deployed by the US in the GIUK gap and other strategically important places.

The Bedford Incident

USS ''Bedford'' (DLG-113)
The American destroyer USS Bedford (DLG-113) detects a Soviet submarine in the GIUK gap near the coast of Greenland.

Mid-Atlantic gap

Air GapAtlantic GapGreenland Air Gap
The origin of the term "gap" dates to this period, when there was a gap in air coverage known as the Mid-Atlantic gap or the "Greenland air gap".

Denmark Strait

Denmark StraitsbetweenDenmark
Between 1940 and 1942, the Denmark Strait between Iceland and Greenland remained one of the few areas that RAF patrol bombers could not reach, and thus became the centre for considerable action.

Red Storm Rising

novel
Nevertheless, the Soviet Navy achieves an advantage by occupying Iceland, taking control of the NATO airbase in Keflavík and ensuring command of the strategically important GIUK gap.

Naval Air Station Keflavik

NAS KeflavikKeflavik AirportKeflavik Naval Air Station
Beginning in 1984, the 932d Air Control Squadron established a Radar Operations Control Center at Keflavik which coordinated the 57th FIS interceptors to contacts passing through the GIUK gap.

Harpoon (video game)

Harpooncomputer gameHarpoon Classic
The game mainly focuses on combat in the GIUK Gap.

Western Approaches

North Western ApproachesNorthwestern ApproachesSouth Western Approaches

Naval warfare

naval battlenaval historynaval historian
The GIUK gap is an area in the northern Atlantic Ocean that forms a naval choke point.

Acronym

initialismacronymsinitials
Its name is an acronym for Greenland, Iceland, and the United Kingdom, the gap being the open ocean between these three landmasses.

Greenland

Kalaallit NunaatGreenlandicGL
Its name is an acronym for Greenland, Iceland, and the United Kingdom, the gap being the open ocean between these three landmasses.

Iceland

IcelandicISLRepublic of Iceland
The GIUK gap is particularly important to the Royal Navy, as any attempt by northern European forces to break into the open Atlantic would have to be made either through the heavily defended English Channel, one of the world's busiest seaways, or through one of the exits on either side of Iceland. Its name is an acronym for Greenland, Iceland, and the United Kingdom, the gap being the open ocean between these three landmasses.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
Its name is an acronym for Greenland, Iceland, and the United Kingdom, the gap being the open ocean between these three landmasses.

English Channel

Channelthe Channelcross-channel
The GIUK gap is particularly important to the Royal Navy, as any attempt by northern European forces to break into the open Atlantic would have to be made either through the heavily defended English Channel, one of the world's busiest seaways, or through one of the exits on either side of Iceland.

Gibraltar

GIBGibraltar Health AuthorityGibraltarian
As the British also control the strategic port of Gibraltar at the entrance to the Mediterranean, this means Spain, France, and Portugal are the only Continental European countries that possess direct access to the Atlantic Ocean that cannot easily be blocked at a choke point by the Royal Navy.

Mediterranean Sea

MediterraneanMediterranean coastWestern Mediterranean
As the British also control the strategic port of Gibraltar at the entrance to the Mediterranean, this means Spain, France, and Portugal are the only Continental European countries that possess direct access to the Atlantic Ocean that cannot easily be blocked at a choke point by the Royal Navy.

Spain

SpanishESPKingdom of Spain
As the British also control the strategic port of Gibraltar at the entrance to the Mediterranean, this means Spain, France, and Portugal are the only Continental European countries that possess direct access to the Atlantic Ocean that cannot easily be blocked at a choke point by the Royal Navy.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
As the British also control the strategic port of Gibraltar at the entrance to the Mediterranean, this means Spain, France, and Portugal are the only Continental European countries that possess direct access to the Atlantic Ocean that cannot easily be blocked at a choke point by the Royal Navy.

Portugal

PortuguesePortuguese RepublicPOR
As the British also control the strategic port of Gibraltar at the entrance to the Mediterranean, this means Spain, France, and Portugal are the only Continental European countries that possess direct access to the Atlantic Ocean that cannot easily be blocked at a choke point by the Royal Navy.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
From the start of World War II in 1939, German ships used the gap to break out from their bases in northern Germany (and from occupied Norway after April 1940) with a view to attacking Allied shipping convoys, but Allied blocking efforts in the North Sea and in the GIUK gap impeded such break-outs.