Gabriele Falloppio

FallopiusFalloppioFallopioFallopius, GabrielGabriel FallopiusGabriele FallopioGabriele Fallopius
Gabriele Falloppio (1523 – October 9, 1562), is a Catholic priest and anatomist often known by his Latin name Fallopius, was one of the most important anatomists and physicians of the sixteenth century.wikipedia
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University of Pisa

PisaPisa UniversityUniversità di Pisa
He was called the next year to the University of Pisa, then the most important university in Italy.
Gabriele Falloppio and Marcello Malpighi lectured in anatomy and medicine.

Hieronymus Fabricius

Girolamo FabriciFabricius ab AquapendenteGirolamo Fabrici d'Acquapendente
Girolamo Fabrici was one of his famous students.
Born in Acquapendente, Latium, Fabricius studied at the University of Padua, receiving a Doctor of Medicine degree in 1559 under the guidance of Gabriele Falloppio.

Padua

PadovaPadua, ItalyPatavium
He was born in Modena and died in Padua.
The list of notable professors and alumni is long, containing, among others, the names of Bembo, Sperone Speroni, the anatomist Vesalius, Copernicus, Fallopius, Fabrizio d'Acquapendente, Galileo Galilei, William Harvey, Pietro Pomponazzi, Reginald, later Cardinal Pole, Scaliger, Tasso and Jan Zamoyski.

University of Padua

PaduaUniversity of PadovaPadua University
In 1551 Falloppio was invited to occupy the chair of anatomy and surgery at the University of Padua.

Fallopian tube

fallopian tubesuterine tubeIsthmus of fallopian tube
He studied the reproductive organs in both sexes, and described the Fallopian tube, which leads from the ovary to the uterus and now bears his name.
The name comes from the Catholic priest and anatomist Gabriele Falloppio for whom other anatomical structures are also named.

Antonio Musa Brassavola

Antonio Musa Brasavola
He received his MD in 1548 under the guidance of Antonio Musa Brassavola.

Facial canal

Aquæductus Fallopiifacial (fallopian) canalFallopian Canal
The aquæductus Fallopii, the canal through which the facial nerve passes after leaving the auditory nerve, is also named after him.
The facial canal (Canalis nervi facialis), also known as the Fallopian Canal, first described by Gabriele Falloppio, is a Z-shaped canal running through the temporal bone from the internal acoustic meatus to the stylomastoid foramen.

Condom

condomscollection condomrubber
Fallopio was the first to describe a condom (in his writings, a linen sheath wrapped around the penis), and he advocated the use of such sheaths to prevent syphilis.
In 16th-century Italy, anatomist and physician Gabriele Falloppio wrote a treatise on syphilis.

Andreas Vesalius

VesaliusAndrea VesaliusVesalius, Andreas
This was the golden age of anatomy and Falloppio's contemporaries included such great anatomists as Vesalius, Eustachius, and Realdo Colombo (whom he succeeded at Padua).
When he reached Jerusalem he received a message from the Venetian senate requesting him again to accept the Paduan professorship, which had become vacant on the death of his friend and pupil Fallopius.

Volcher Coiter

Koyter
They were published by Volcher Coiter (Nuremberg, 1575).
He studied in Italy and France and was a pupil of Ulisse Aldrovandi, Gabriele Falloppio, Bartolomeo Eustachi and Guillaume Rondelet.

List of Catholic clergy scientists

List of Roman Catholic scientist-clericsList of Jesuit scientistsList of Roman Catholic cleric-scientists
*List of Roman Catholic scientist-clerics

Realdo Colombo

De Re AnatomicaRenaldus ColumbusRealdo Columbo
This was the golden age of anatomy and Falloppio's contemporaries included such great anatomists as Vesalius, Eustachius, and Realdo Colombo (whom he succeeded at Padua).
Many of the contributions made in De Re Anatomica overlapped the discoveries of another anatomist, Gabriele Falloppio, most notably in that both Colombo and Falloppio claimed to have discovered the clitoris.

Medicine

medicalmedical scienceclinical medicine
In the early modern period, important early figures in medicine and anatomy emerged in Europe, including Gabriele Falloppio and William Harvey.

Priesthood in the Catholic Church

priestpriesthoodCatholic priest
Gabriele Falloppio (1523 – October 9, 1562), is a Catholic priest and anatomist often known by his Latin name Fallopius, was one of the most important anatomists and physicians of the sixteenth century.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
Gabriele Falloppio (1523 – October 9, 1562), is a Catholic priest and anatomist often known by his Latin name Fallopius, was one of the most important anatomists and physicians of the sixteenth century.

Human body

bodyhuman anatomyhuman physiology
Gabriele Falloppio (1523 – October 9, 1562), is a Catholic priest and anatomist often known by his Latin name Fallopius, was one of the most important anatomists and physicians of the sixteenth century.

Physician

doctormedical doctorphysicians
Gabriele Falloppio (1523 – October 9, 1562), is a Catholic priest and anatomist often known by his Latin name Fallopius, was one of the most important anatomists and physicians of the sixteenth century.

Modena

MutinaModena, ItalyModenese
He was born in Modena and died in Padua.

Clergy

clergymanclericclerics
Financial difficulties led him to join the clergy, and in 1542, he became a canon at Modena's cathedral.

Canon (priest)

canoncanonsCanon Residentiary
Financial difficulties led him to join the clergy, and in 1542, he became a canon at Modena's cathedral.

Cathedral

cathedralscathedral churchproto-cathedral
Financial difficulties led him to join the clergy, and in 1542, he became a canon at Modena's cathedral.

University of Ferrara

FerraraFerrara UniversityUniversità di Ferrara
He studied medicine at the University of Ferrara, at that time one of the best medical schools in Europe.

Botany

botanistbotanicalplant biology
He also held the professorship of botany and was superintendent of the botanical gardens.

Eardrum

tympanic membraneear drumtympanum
He added much to what was known before about the internal ear and described in detail the tympanum and its relations to the osseous ring in which it is situated.

Round window

roundcircularfenestra cochleae
He also described minutely the circular and oval windows (fenestræ) and their communication with the vestibule and cochlea.