Gaels

GaelicGaelGaelic cultureScotsHighland ScotsHighlandernative ScottishScottishGoidelsHighlanders
The Gaels (Na Gaeil ; Na Gàidheil ; Ny Gaeil ) are an ethnolinguistic group native to Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man in northwestern Europe.wikipedia
1,333 Related Articles

Isle of Man

ManxMannIsle of Mann
The Gaels (Na Gaeil ; Na Gàidheil ; Ny Gaeil ) are an ethnolinguistic group native to Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man in northwestern Europe.
Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century AD, and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged.

Irish people

IrishIrishmanIrish descent
Historically, the ethnonyms Irish and Scots referred to the Gaels in general, but the scope of those ethnicities and nationalities is today more complex.
For most of Ireland's recorded history, the Irish have been primarily a Gaelic people (see Gaelic Ireland).

Gaelic Ireland

GaelicGaelic IrishIrish
Gaelic language and culture originated in Ireland, extending to Dál Riata in western Scotland.
Gaelic Ireland (Éire Ghaelach) was the Gaelic political and social order, and associated culture, that existed in Ireland from the prehistoric era until the early 17th century.

Dál Riata

DalriadaDal RiataDal Riada
Gaelic language and culture originated in Ireland, extending to Dál Riata in western Scotland. The Irish Gaels can be grouped into the following major historical groups; Connachta (including Uí Néill, Clan Colla, Uí Maine, etc.), Dál gCais, Eóganachta, Érainn (including Dál Riata, Dál Fiatach, etc.), Laigin and Ulaid (including Dál nAraidi).
Dál Riata or Dál Riada (also Dalriada) was a Gaelic kingdom and political entity that encompassed western Scotland and north Ireland, stretching across each side of the North Channel.

Scottish people

ScottishScotsScot
Historically, the ethnonyms Irish and Scots referred to the Gaels in general, but the scope of those ethnicities and nationalities is today more complex.
Historically, they emerged from an amalgamation of two Celtic-speaking peoples, the Picts and Gaels, who founded the Kingdom of Scotland (or Alba) in the 9th century.

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
The Gaels (Na Gaeil ; Na Gàidheil ; Ny Gaeil ) are an ethnolinguistic group native to Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man in northwestern Europe.
"Scotland" comes from Scoti, the Latin name for the Gaels.

Scotland in the Middle Ages

Middle Agesmedieval ScotlandScotland
Gaelic language and culture originated in Ireland, extending to Dál Riata in western Scotland.
In the ninth century the Scots and Picts combined under the House of Alpin to form a single Kingdom of Alba, with a Pictish base and dominated by Gaelic culture.

Ireland

IrishIRLisland of Ireland
The Gaels (Na Gaeil ; Na Gàidheil ; Ny Gaeil ) are an ethnolinguistic group native to Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man in northwestern Europe.
Lastly, the Milesians (Gaels) were said to have reached Ireland from either northern Iberia or southern Gaul.

Tanistry

tanisttánaistetànaiste
Traditional Gaelic society is organised into clans, each with its own territory and king (or chief), elected through tanistry.
Tanistry is a Gaelic system for passing on titles and lands.

Plantations of Ireland

plantationPlantation of Munsterplantations
James I sought to subdue the Gaels and wipe out their culture; in Ireland by colonizing Gaelic land with English-speaking British settlers, and in the Scottish Highlands via repressive laws such as the Statutes of Iona.
The 16th-century plantations were established through large areas of the country by the confiscation of lands occupied by Gaelic clans and Hiberno-Norman dynasties, but principally in the provinces of Munster and Leinster.

Samhain

SamainCeltic New YearFestival of Samhain
Their four yearly festivals – Samhain, Imbolc, Beltane and Lughnasa – continued to be celebrated into modern times.
Samhain is a Gaelic festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the "darker half" of the year.

Beltane

BealtaineBeltaineBeltain
Their four yearly festivals – Samhain, Imbolc, Beltane and Lughnasa – continued to be celebrated into modern times.
Beltane or Beltain is the Gaelic May Day festival.

Imbolc

Brigid's DayImbolicSaint Brigid's Day
Their four yearly festivals – Samhain, Imbolc, Beltane and Lughnasa – continued to be celebrated into modern times.
Imbolc or Imbolg, also called (Saint) Brigid's Day (Lá Fhéile Bríde, Là Fhèill Brìghde, Laa'l Breeshey), is a Gaelic traditional festival marking the beginning of spring.

Galloway

GallovidianGalwegiansGallovidians
However, Gaelic culture remained strong throughout Ireland, the Scottish Highlands and Galloway.
The Gall Gaidheil, literally meaning "Stranger-Gaidheil", originally referred to a population of mixed Scandinavian and Gaelic ethnicity that inhabited Galloway in the Middle Ages.

Kingdom of Alba

AlbaKings of AlbaScots
In the 9th century, Dál Riata and Pictland merged to form the Gaelic Kingdom of Alba.
Some of the offices were Gaelic in origin, such as the Hostarius (later Usher or "Doorward"), the man in charge of the royal bodyguard, and the rannaire, the Gaelic-speaking member of the court whose job was to divide the food.

Celtic Otherworld

OtherworldOtherworldlythe Otherworld
The Irish were previously pagans who worshipped the Tuatha Dé Danann, venerated the ancestors and believed in an Otherworld.
In Gaelic and Brittonic mythology it is usually described as a supernatural realm of everlasting youth, beauty, health, abundance and joy.

Culture of Ireland

Irish cultureIrishculture
Gaelic culture continues to be a major component of Irish, Scottish and Manx culture.
For most of its recorded history, Irish culture has been primarily Gaelic (see Gaelic Ireland).

Kilt

kiltsScottish kiltfull Highland dress
The Gaels had their own style of dress, which (in Scotland) became the belted plaid and kilt.
A kilt (fèileadh ) is a type of knee-length non-bifurcated skirt with pleats at the back, originating in the traditional dress of Gaelic men and boys in the Scottish Highlands.

Feis

FeiseanfeiseannaFéis
They also have distinctive music, dance, festivals, and sports.
A Feis or Fèis is a traditional Gaelic arts and culture festival.

Vestmenn

VestmenWestmenWestman
An Old Norse name for the Gaels was Vestmenn ('Westmen').
Vestmenn (Westmen in English) was the Old Norse word for the Gaels of Ireland and Britain, especially Ireland.

Scoti

ScotsScottiIrish
The Romans began to use the term Scoti to describe the Gaels in Latin from the 4th century onward.
Scoti or Scotti is a Latin name for the Gaels, first attested in the late 3rd century.

Traditional Gaelic music

Gaelicmusic
They also have distinctive music, dance, festivals, and sports.
The emigration of Scottish Gaels to Cape Breton has also resulted in a unique strain of Gaelic music evolving there.

Picts

PictishPictPictland
In the 9th century, Dál Riata and Pictland merged to form the Gaelic Kingdom of Alba.
By 900, the resulting Pictish over-kingdom had merged with the Gaelic kingdom of Dál Riata to form the Kingdom of Alba (Scotland); and by the 13th century Alba had expanded to include the formerly Brittonic kingdom of Strathclyde, Northumbrian Lothian, Galloway and the Western Isles.

Dalcassians

Dál gCaisDalcassianDal gCais
The Irish Gaels can be grouped into the following major historical groups; Connachta (including Uí Néill, Clan Colla, Uí Maine, etc.), Dál gCais, Eóganachta, Érainn (including Dál Riata, Dál Fiatach, etc.), Laigin and Ulaid (including Dál nAraidi).
The Dalcassians (Dál gCais ) were a Gaelic Irish tribe, generally accepted by contemporary scholarship as being a branch of the Déisi Muman, that became a powerful group in Ireland during the 10th century.

Lebor Gabála Érenn

Book of InvasionsLebor GabálaLebor Gabala Erenn
Ériu is mentioned as a goddess in the Lebor Gabála Érenn as a daughter of Ernmas of the Tuatha Dé Danann.
The first four groups are wiped out or forced to abandon the island, the fifth group represent Ireland's pagan gods, while the final group represent the Irish people (the Gaels).