Galicia (Eastern Europe)

GaliciaGalicianHalychynaEastern GaliciaGalicia (Central Europe)GalicjaEast GaliciaAustrian GaliciaGalaciaGalicia, Austria-Hungary
Galicia ( Ukrainian and, Halyčyna; Galicja; Czech and Halič; Galizien; Galícia/Kaliz/Gácsország/Halics; Galiția/Halici; Галиция, Galitsiya; גאַליציע Galitsiye) is a historical and geographic region between Central and Eastern Europe.wikipedia
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Halych

HaliczGalichGalician
The area, named after the medieval city of Halych, was first mentioned in Hungarian historical chronicles in the year 1206 as Galiciæ.
The city gave its name to the Principality of Halych, the historic province of Galicia (Halychyna), and the Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia, of which it was the capital until the early 14th century, when the seat of the local rulers moved to Lviv.

Daniel of Galicia

Danylo of HalychDaniel of HalychDaniil Romanovich
In 1253 Prince Daniel of Galicia was crowned the King of Rus (Rex Rusiae) or King of Ruthenia following the Mongol invasion in Ruthenia (Kievan Rus).
Daniel of Galicia : Danylo Romanovych (Halytskyi); Old Ruthenian: Данило Романовичъ: Danylo Romanovyčъ; Daniel I Romanowicz Halicki; 1201 – 1264) was a King of Ruthenia, Prince (Knyaz) of Galicia (Halych) (1205–1255), Peremyshl (1211), and Volodymyr (1212–1231).

Austria-Hungary

Austro-Hungarian EmpireAustro-HungarianAustria–Hungary
It was once the small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, which straddled the modern-day border between Poland and Ukraine. Moreover, despite the fact that Austria's claim derived from the historical Hungarian crown, "Galicia and Lodomeria" were not officially assigned to Hungary, and after the Ausgleich of 1867, the territory found itself in Cisleithania, or the Austrian-administered part of Austria-Hungary.
Certain regions, such as Polish Galicia within Cisleithania and Croatia within Transleithania, enjoyed autonomous status, each with its own unique governmental structures (see: Polish Autonomy in Galicia and Croatian–Hungarian Settlement).

Western Ukraine

West UkrainewesternWestern Ukrainian
The nucleus of historic Galicia lies within the modern regions of western Ukraine: the Lviv, Ternopil and Ivano-Frankivsk oblasts near Halych.
It includes several actual historical regions such as Transcarpathia, Halychyna including Pokuttia, most of Volhynia, northern Bukovina as well as western Podolia.

Lviv

LwówLembergLvov
It covers much of such historic regions as Red Ruthenia (centered on Lviv) and Lesser Poland (centered in Kraków).
Lviv was the centre of the historical regions of Red Ruthenia and Galicia.

Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast

Ivano-FrankivskIvano-Frankivsk regionStanislav Oblast
The nucleus of historic Galicia lies within the modern regions of western Ukraine: the Lviv, Ternopil and Ivano-Frankivsk oblasts near Halych.
Prykarpattia, together with Lviv and Ternopil regions, was the main body of the historic region of eastern Halychyna; which in the 13th century was a part of the Kingdom of Rus and the Halych-Volyn Principality (see Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia).

Lesser Poland

MałopolskaLesser PolishEast Małopolska
It covers much of such historic regions as Red Ruthenia (centered on Lviv) and Lesser Poland (centered in Kraków).
In the era of partitions, the southern part, known as Galicia, was sometimes also called Lesser Poland.

Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
It was once the small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, which straddled the modern-day border between Poland and Ukraine.
Thus, in the 19th century, only Austrian-ruled Galicia, and particularly the Free City of Kraków, allowed free Polish culture to flourish.

Ukraine

UkrainianUKRUkrainia
It was once the small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, which straddled the modern-day border between Poland and Ukraine.
Austrian Galicia, under the relatively lenient rule of the Habsburgs, became the centre of the nationalist movement.

Ukrainian language

UkrainianUkrainian-languagemodern Ukrainian language
Galicia ( Ukrainian and, Halyčyna; Galicja; Czech and Halič; Galizien; Galícia/Kaliz/Gácsország/Halics; Galiția/Halici; Галиция, Galitsiya; גאַליציע Galitsiye) is a historical and geographic region between Central and Eastern Europe.
During the 19th century, a revival of Ukrainian self-identification manifested in the literary classes of both Russian-Empire Dnieper Ukraine and Austrian Galicia.

Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia

Galicia-VolhyniaGalicia–VolhyniaHalych-Volhynia
It was once the small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, which straddled the modern-day border between Poland and Ukraine.
The Kingdom or Principality of Galicia–Volhynia (Old East Slavic: Галицко-Волинскоє князство; Галицько-Волинське князівство; Regnum Galiciae et Lodomeriae), also known as the Kingdom of Ruthenia (Королівство Русь, Regnum Russiae) since 1253, was a state in the regions of Galicia and Volhynia that existed 1199 to 1349.

Podolia

PodilliaPodolePodilia
There is considerable overlap between Galicia and Podolia (to the east) as well as between Galicia and south-west Ruthenia, especially in a cross-border region (centred on Carpathian Ruthenia) inhabited by various nationalities.
Podolia lies east of historic Red Ruthenia, i.e. the eastern half of Galicia, beyond the Seret River, a tributary of the Dniester.

Kraków

KrakowCracowKraków, Poland
It covers much of such historic regions as Red Ruthenia (centered on Lviv) and Lesser Poland (centered in Kraków).
In 1866, Austria granted a degree of autonomy to Galicia after its own defeat in the Austro-Prussian War.

Carpathian Ruthenia

TranscarpathiaSubcarpathian RusSubcarpathian Ruthenia
There is considerable overlap between Galicia and Podolia (to the east) as well as between Galicia and south-west Ruthenia, especially in a cross-border region (centred on Carpathian Ruthenia) inhabited by various nationalities.
Slavs from the north (Galicia) and east – who actually arrived from Podolia via the mountain passes of Transylvania – continued to settle in small numbers in various parts of the Carpathian borderland, which the Hungarians and other medieval writers referred to as the Marchia Ruthenorum – the Rus' March.

Central Europe

CentralMiddle EuropeCentral European
Galicia ( Ukrainian and, Halyčyna; Galicja; Czech and Halič; Galizien; Galícia/Kaliz/Gácsország/Halics; Galiția/Halici; Галиция, Galitsiya; גאַליציע Galitsiye) is a historical and geographic region between Central and Eastern Europe.

Galicia–Volhynia Wars

Galicia-Volhynia Warswars over the succession of Galicia-Volhynia PrincipalityHalych-Volhyn Wars
In 1349, in the course of the Galicia–Volhynia Wars, King Casimir III the Great of Poland conquered the major part of Galicia and put an end to the independence of this territory.
After a prolonged conflict, Galicia–Volhynia was divided between Poland (Galicia) and Lithuania (Volhynia) and the principality ceased to exist as an independent state.

Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria

GaliciaAustrian GaliciaAustrian Poland
It was once the small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, which straddled the modern-day border between Poland and Ukraine.
The nucleus of historic Galicia consists of the modern Lviv, Ternopil, and Ivano-Frankivsk regions of western Ukraine.

Ruthenia

RusRuthenianAll Rus
There is considerable overlap between Galicia and Podolia (to the east) as well as between Galicia and south-west Ruthenia, especially in a cross-border region (centred on Carpathian Ruthenia) inhabited by various nationalities.
In the course of time, the term Rus became restricted to western parts of present-day Ukraine (Galicia/Halych, Carpathian Ruthenia), an area where Ukrainian nationalism, ardently supported by Austro-Hungarian authorities, competed with Galician Russophilia.

Red Ruthenia

Red RusCherven townsCzerwień
It covers much of such historic regions as Red Ruthenia (centered on Lviv) and Lesser Poland (centered in Kraków).
The town of Halych gave its name to Galicia.During the 1340s, the influence of the Rurik dynasty ended; most of the area passed to Casimir the Great, with Kiev and the state of Volhynia falling under Lithuanian control.

White Croats

White CroatCharvátsin and around today
During the Great Migration period of Europe (coinciding with the fall of the Roman Empire), a variety of nomadic groups invaded the area, but overall, the East Slavic tribes White Croats and Tivertsi dominated the area since the 6th century until were annexed to Kievan Rus' in the 10th century.
White Croats (Bijeli Hrvati; Biali Chorwaci; ; Білі хорвати) were a group of Slavic tribes who lived among other West and East Slavic tribes in the area of Bohemia, Lesser Poland, Galicia (north of Carpathian Mountains) and modern-day Western Ukraine.

Cisleithania

AustrianCisleithania (Austria)Austria
Moreover, despite the fact that Austria's claim derived from the historical Hungarian crown, "Galicia and Lodomeria" were not officially assigned to Hungary, and after the Ausgleich of 1867, the territory found itself in Cisleithania, or the Austrian-administered part of Austria-Hungary.
In general, the lands were just called Austria, but the term "Austrian lands" (Österreichische Länder) originally did not apply to the Lands of the Bohemian Crown (i.e., Bohemia proper, the Margraviate of Moravia and Duchy of Silesia) or to the territories annexed in the 18th-century Partitions of Poland (Galicia) or the former Venetian Dalmatia.

Nowy Sącz

Nowy SaczSanz14 – Nowy Sącz
In 1772, during the Partitions of Poland, the town was annexed by the Habsburg Empire as part of Galicia, where it remained until November 1918.

Russian Empire

RussiaImperial RussiaRussian
In fact, the territories acquired by Austria did not correspond exactly to those of former Halych-Volhynia – the Russian Empire took control of Volhynia to the north-east, including the city of Volodymyr-Volynskyi (Włodzimierz Wołyński) – after which Lodomeria was named.
In August 1914, the Russian army invaded Germany's province of East Prussia and occupied a significant portion of Austrian-controlled Galicia in support of the Serbs and their allies – the French and British.

West Ukrainian People's Republic

West Ukrainian National RepublicWestern Ukrainian People's RepublicWest Ukraine
The local Ukrainian population briefly declared the independence of Eastern Galicia as the "West Ukrainian People's Republic".
The West Ukrainian People's Republic (Західноукраїнська Народна Республіка, ZUNR) was a short-lived republic that existed from November 1918 to July 1919 in eastern Galicia.

Grand Duchy of Kraków

Grand Duchy of CracowCracowGrand Duchy of Krakow
After the incorporation of the Free City of Kraków in 1846, it was extended to Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, and the Grand Duchy of Kraków with the Duchies of Auschwitz and Zator (Königreich Galizien und Lodomerien mit dem Großherzogtum Krakau und den Herzogtümern Auschwitz und Zator).
At the same time the official name of the Austrian administrative entity containing approximately Galicia, and some Polish areas west of it, was changed to the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, and the Grand Duchy of Kraków with the Duchies of Auschwitz and Zator.