Gallia Belgica

BelgicaBelgic GaulBelgica SecundaBelgiumBelgicBelgaeBelgaichBelgiaBelgianBelgian Gaul
Gallia Belgica ("Belgic Gaul") was a province of the Roman empire located in the north-eastern part of Roman Gaul, in what is today primarily France, Belgium, and Luxembourg, along with parts of the Netherlands and Germany.wikipedia
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Belgium

🇧🇪BelgianBEL
Gallia Belgica ("Belgic Gaul") was a province of the Roman empire located in the north-eastern part of Roman Gaul, in what is today primarily France, Belgium, and Luxembourg, along with parts of the Netherlands and Germany.
Its name is derived from the Latin word Belgica, after the Roman province of Gallia Belgica.

Roman Gaul

GaulGallo-RomanGallic
Gallia Belgica ("Belgic Gaul") was a province of the Roman empire located in the north-eastern part of Roman Gaul, in what is today primarily France, Belgium, and Luxembourg, along with parts of the Netherlands and Germany.
In 22 BC, imperial administration of Gaul was reorganized, establishing the provinces of Gallia Aquitania, Gallia Belgica and Gallia Lugdunensis.

Netherlands

Dutch🇳🇱the Netherlands
Gallia Belgica ("Belgic Gaul") was a province of the Roman empire located in the north-eastern part of Roman Gaul, in what is today primarily France, Belgium, and Luxembourg, along with parts of the Netherlands and Germany.
At first part of Gallia Belgica, the area south of the Limes became part of the Roman province of Germania Inferior.

Belgae

BelgicBelgianBelgic tribes
An official Roman province was later created by emperor Augustus in 22 BC. The province was named for the Belgae, as the largest tribal confederation in the area, but also included the territories of the Treveri, Mediomatrici, Leuci, Sequani, Helvetii and others.
The Belgae gave their name to the Roman province of Gallia Belgica and, much later, to the modern country of Belgium; today "Belgae" is also Latin for "Belgians".

Helvetii

HelvetianHelveticHelveti
An official Roman province was later created by emperor Augustus in 22 BC. The province was named for the Belgae, as the largest tribal confederation in the area, but also included the territories of the Treveri, Mediomatrici, Leuci, Sequani, Helvetii and others.
The Swiss plateau was at first incorporated into the Roman province of Gallia Belgica (22 BC), later into Germania Superior (AD 83).

Civitas Tungrorum

civitas'' of TongerenDioecesis LeodiensisTungrorum
Diocletian brought the northeastern Civitas Tungrorum into Germania Inferior, joining the Rhineland colonies, and the remaining part of Gallia Belgica was divided into Belgica Prima in the eastern area of the Treveri, Mediomatrici and Leuci, around Luxembourg and the Ardennes, and Belgica Secunda between the English channel and the upper River Meuse.
In the early days of the Roman empire it was in the province of Gallia Belgica, but it later joined the neighbouring lower Rhine river border districts, within the province of Germania Inferior.

Suessiones

) Modern historians interpret Caesar and the archaeological evidence as indicating that the core of the Belgian alliance was in the present-day northernmost corner of France; the Suessiones, Viromandui and Ambiani as well perhaps as some of their neighbours who lived in the area, Caesar identified as Belgium or Belgica. At the beginning of the conflict, Caesar reported the allies' combined strength at 288,000, led by the Suessione king, Galba.
The Suessiones were a Belgic tribe of western Gallia Belgica in the 1st century BC, inhabiting the region between the Oise and the Marne, around the present-day city of Soissons.

Trier

TrèvesAugusta TreverorumEuren
The capital of Belgica Prima, Trier, became an important late western Roman capital.
The city later became the capital of the province of Belgic Gaul; after the Diocletian Reforms, it became the capital of the prefecture of the Gauls, overseeing much of the Western Roman Empire.

Treveri

TreviriTreveranTREVERORUM
An official Roman province was later created by emperor Augustus in 22 BC. The province was named for the Belgae, as the largest tribal confederation in the area, but also included the territories of the Treveri, Mediomatrici, Leuci, Sequani, Helvetii and others.
During the Roman period, Trier became a Roman colony (in 16 BCE), and the provincial capital of Belgica itself.

Western Roman Empire

Western EmpireWesternWest
The capital of Belgica Prima, Trier, became an important late western Roman capital.
Octavian obtained the Roman provinces of the West: Italia (modern Italy), Gaul (modern France), Gallia Belgica (parts of modern Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg), and Hispania (modern Spain and Portugal).

Gallia Lugdunensis

Lugdunensis QuartaSecunda Provincia LugdunensisGallia Lugdunensis I
In 50 BC after the conquest by Julius Caesar during his Gallic Wars, it became one of the three newly conquered provinces of Gaul (known as the Tres Galliae (the 3 Gauls), the other two being Gallia Aquitania and Gallia Lugdunensis).
The territory of the Galli extended from the rivers Seine and Marne in the north-east, which formed the boundary with Gallia Belgica, to the river Garonne in the south-west, which formed the border with Gallia Aquitania.

Roman province

provinceprovincesprovincial
Gallia Belgica ("Belgic Gaul") was a province of the Roman empire located in the north-eastern part of Roman Gaul, in what is today primarily France, Belgium, and Luxembourg, along with parts of the Netherlands and Germany.
27 BC or 16-13 BC - Gallia Belgica (Netherlands south of the Rhine river, Belgium, Luxembourg, part of northern France and Germany west of the Rhine; there is uncertainty as to whether it was created with Augustus’ first visit and the first census on Gaul or during Augustus' visit in 16-13 (imperial proconsular province)

Celts

CelticCeltCeltic people
The southern border of Belgica, formed by the Marne and Seine rivers, was reported by Caesar as the original cultural boundary between the Belgae and the Celtic Gauls, whom he distinguished from one another.
The Romans attached large swathes of this region to neighboring provinces Belgica and Aquitania, particularly under Augustus.

Cassel, Nord

CasselKassel
The capital cities of these districts included modern Cassel (replaced by Tournai as Menapian civitas), Bavay (replaced by Cambrai as Nervian civitas), Thérouanne, Arras, St. Quentin, Soissons, Reims, Beauvais, Amiens, Tongeren, Triers, Toul and Metz.
The Menapii fought against Julius Caesar but were forced to submit to Rome in 53 BC. They rebelled along with their neighbours, the Morini, in 30 or 29 BC. The Roman governor of Gaul, Carrinas, successfully quelled the rebellion and the territory of the Menapii was subsequently absorbed into the Roman province of Gallia Belgica.

Galba (Suessiones)

Galba
At the beginning of the conflict, Caesar reported the allies' combined strength at 288,000, led by the Suessione king, Galba.
Galba (fl. mid-1st century BC) was a king (rex) of the Suessiones, a Celtic polity of Belgic Gaul, during the Gallic Wars.

Sequani

Maxima SequanorumProvincia Maxima SequanorumSéquanes
An official Roman province was later created by emperor Augustus in 22 BC. The province was named for the Belgae, as the largest tribal confederation in the area, but also included the territories of the Treveri, Mediomatrici, Leuci, Sequani, Helvetii and others.
Under Augustus, the district known as Sequania formed part of Belgica.

Gauls

GallicGaulishGaul
The southern border of Belgica, formed by the Marne and Seine rivers, was reported by Caesar as the original cultural boundary between the Belgae and the Celtic Gauls, whom he distinguished from one another.

Bavay

BagacumBavai
The capital cities of these districts included modern Cassel (replaced by Tournai as Menapian civitas), Bavay (replaced by Cambrai as Nervian civitas), Thérouanne, Arras, St. Quentin, Soissons, Reims, Beauvais, Amiens, Tongeren, Triers, Toul and Metz. Further the capitals in the areas of the former tribes of the Atrebates, Morini and the Nervians were either burnt down (Nemetacum (Arras)) or had to be rebuilt in the last quarter of the second century, Colonia Morinorum (Thérouanne) and Bagacum Nerviorum (Bavay).
The region between the Seine and the Rhine was Gallia Belgica and its capital was at Reims.

Flanders

FlemishFlemingsFlemish Region
In 173 the later emperor Didius Julianus, then governor of Gallia Belgica, had to repel a serious invasion of the Chauci, a Germanic tribe that lived along the shores of the Wadden Sea at the respective northern and northwestern coast of present-day Netherlands and Germany, in the drainage basin of the river Scheldt (present day Flanders and Hainaut).
When Julius Caesar conquered the area he described it as the less economically developed and more warlike part of Gallia Belgica.

Chauci

In 173 the later emperor Didius Julianus, then governor of Gallia Belgica, had to repel a serious invasion of the Chauci, a Germanic tribe that lived along the shores of the Wadden Sea at the respective northern and northwestern coast of present-day Netherlands and Germany, in the drainage basin of the river Scheldt (present day Flanders and Hainaut).
They raided along the then-wealthy coast of Gallia Belgica (i.e., the land south of the Rhine and north of the Rivers Marne and Seine), and the Chauci made inroads into the region that would later become the neighbouring Roman province of Germania Inferior, in the area of the Rhine delta in what is now the southern Netherlands.

Didius Julianus

JulianMarcus Didius JulianusJulianus
In 173 the later emperor Didius Julianus, then governor of Gallia Belgica, had to repel a serious invasion of the Chauci, a Germanic tribe that lived along the shores of the Wadden Sea at the respective northern and northwestern coast of present-day Netherlands and Germany, in the drainage basin of the river Scheldt (present day Flanders and Hainaut).
In 170, he became praefectus of Gallia Belgica and served for five years.

Ripuarian Franks

RipuarianRipuariansFranks
The Rhineland (to the Ripuarian Franks) and the area between the Rhine and the main road between Boulogne and Cologne, present day South Holland, Zeeland, Flanders, Brabant and Limburg, the last three in both the present day Netherlands and Belgium (to the Salian Franks) were de facto lost forever for the Roman empire.
Austrasia included not only the Rhineland-Palatinate, but apparently the whole of the Germania Inferior (re-named in the late Roman empire as Germania II) and Gallia Belgica II. The border between Austrasia and Neustria was the Silva Carbonaria in modern Wallonia, but the exact definition of this forest region is now unclear.

Atrebates

AttribatesBelgic Britons
Further the capitals in the areas of the former tribes of the Atrebates, Morini and the Nervians were either burnt down (Nemetacum (Arras)) or had to be rebuilt in the last quarter of the second century, Colonia Morinorum (Thérouanne) and Bagacum Nerviorum (Bavay).
Ptolemy's 2nd century Geography refers to the "Atribati" living on the coast of Belgic Gaul, near the river Sequana (Seine), and names Metacum as one of their towns.

Toxandri

TaxandriaPagus ToxandriaTaxandrians
Around 350 Salian Franks who were already living in Batavia were settled in Toxandria.
He placed them at the extreme edge of Gallia Belgica, the River Scaldis (modern Scheldt) which some translations interpret as being "beyond" that river, with the Menapii on the more Roman side.

Velzeke-Ruddershove

Archaeologists have found evidence that large farms near Tournai and the village Velzeke (near Ghent) had to be abandoned.
Settlement in Velzeke goes back at least to Roman times, when it was a vicus situated at a crossroads in the network of Roman roads in Gallia Belgica.