A report on Gamal Abdel Nasser

President Nasser in 1962
Nasser in 1931
Nasser's name circled in Al-Gihad
Portrait of Nasser at law school in 1937
Nasser (center) with Ahmed Mazhar (left) in army, 1940
Nasser (first from left) with his unit in the Faluja pocket, displaying weapons captured from the Israeli Army during the 1948 war.
The Free Officers after the coup, 1953. Counterclockwise: Zakaria Mohieddin, Abdel Latif Boghdadi, Kamel el-Din Hussein (standing), Nasser (seated), Abdel Hakim Amer, Mohamed Naguib, Youssef Seddik, and Ahmad Shawki.
Leaders of Egypt following the ouster of King Farouk, November 1952. Seated, left to right: Sulayman Hafez, Mohamed Naguib and Nasser
Nasser (right) and Mohamed Naguib (left) during celebrations marking the second anniversary of the 1952 revolution, July 1954
Nasser and Naguib saluting at the opening of the Suez Canal
Liberation organization in Alexandria invitation to Nasser speech 26 October 1954
Nasser greeted by crowds in Alexandria one day after his announcement of the British withdrawal and the assassination attempt against him, 27 October 1954.
Nasser and Imam Ahmad of North Yemen facing the camera, Prince Faisal of Saudi Arabia in white robes in the background, Amin al-Husayni of the All-Palestine Government in the foreground at the Bandung Conference, April 1955
Nasser submitting his vote for the referendum of the proposed constitution, 23 June 1956
Nasser raising the Egyptian flag over the Suez Canal city of Port Said to celebrate the final British military withdrawal from the country, June 1956
Nasser giving a speech at the opening of the Suez Canal
The signing of the regional defense pact between Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Syria and Jordan, January 1957. At the forefront, from left right: Prime Minister Sulayman al-Nabulsi of Jordan, King Hussein of Jordan, King Saud of Saudi Arabia, Nasser, Prime Minister Sabri al-Asali of Syria
Nasser seated alongside Crown Prince Muhammad al-Badr of North Yemen (center) and Shukri al-Quwatli (right), February 1958. North Yemen joined the UAR to form the United Arab States, a loose confederation.
Nasser (right) and Lebanese president Fuad Chehab (to Nasser's right) at the Syrian–Lebanese border during talks to end the crisis in Lebanon. Akram al-Hawrani stands third to Nasser's left, and Abdel Hamid Sarraj stands to Chehab's right, March 1959.
Nasser waving to crowds in Damascus, Syria, October 1960
Nasser (center) receiving Algerian president Ahmed Ben Bella (right) and Iraqi president Abdel Salam Aref (left) for the Arab League summit in Alexandria, September 1964. Ben Bella and Aref were close allies of Nasser.
Nasser before Yemeni crowds on his arrival to Sana'a, April 1964. In front of Nasser and giving a salute is Yemeni President Abdullah al-Sallal
Government officials attending Friday prayers at al-Azhar Mosque, 1959. From left to right; Interior Minister Zakaria Mohieddin, Nasser, Social Affairs Minister Hussein el-Shafei and National Union Secretary Anwar Sadat
Nasser being sworn in for a second term as Egypt's president, 25 March 1965
Nasser (center), King Hussein of Jordan (left) and Egyptian Army Chief of Staff Abdel Hakim Amer (right) at the Supreme Command of the Armed Forces headquarters in Cairo before signing a mutual defense pact, 30 May 1967
Egyptian demonstrators protesting Nasser's resignation, 1967
Nasser observing the Suez front with Egyptian officers during the 1968 War of Attrition. General Commander Mohamed Fawzi is directly behind Nasser, and to their left is Chief of Staff Abdel Moneim Riad.
Nasser brokering a ceasefire between Yasser Arafat of the PLO (left) and King Hussein of Jordan (right) at the emergency Arab League summit in Cairo on 27 September 1970, one day before Nasser's death
Nasser's funeral procession attended by five million mourners in Cairo, 1 October 1970
Gamal Abdel Nasser Mosque in Cairo, the site of his burial
Nasser presenting prominent and blind writer Taha Hussein (standing in front of Nasser) with a national honors prize for literature, 1959
Nasser speaking to a homeless Egyptian man and offering him a job, after the man was found sleeping below the stage where Nasser was seated, 1959
Nasser waving to crowds in Mansoura, 1960
Anwar Sadat (left) and Nasser in the National Assembly, 1964. Sadat succeeded Nasser as president in 1970 and significantly departed from Nasser's policies throughout his rule.
Jaafar Nimeiry of Sudan (left), Nasser, and Muammar Gaddafi of Libya (right) at the Tripoli Airport, 1969. Nimeiry and Gaddafi were influenced by Nasser's pan-Arabist ideas and the latter sought to succeed him as "leader of the Arabs".
Nasser and his family in Manshiyat al-Bakri, 1963. From left to right, his daughter Mona, his wife Tahia Kazem, daughter Hoda, son Abdel Hakim, son Khaled, son Abdel Hamid, and Nasser.

Egyptian politician who served as the second president of Egypt from 1954 until his death in 1970.

- Gamal Abdel Nasser

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Suleiman Nabulsi in his study

Suleiman Nabulsi

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Leftist Jordanian political figure who served as the 12th Prime Minister of Jordan in 1956–57.

Leftist Jordanian political figure who served as the 12th Prime Minister of Jordan in 1956–57.

Suleiman Nabulsi in his study
King Hussein with PM Suleiman Nabulsi
Nabulsi with Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser in Cairo while heading the Jordanian delegation to the Arab Parliament Conference, 1968
Suleiman Nabulsi smoking, October 1956.

His policies as Prime Minister frequently clashed with that of King Hussein's. Nabulsi wanted Jordan to move closer to Egypt under Gamal Abdel Nasser, but Hussein wanted it to stay in the Western camp.

1956–1957 exodus and expulsions from Egypt

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The 1956–57 exodus and expulsions from Egypt was the exodus and expulsion of Egypt's Mutamassirun, which began during the latter stages of the Suez Crisis in Nasserist Egypt.

Collage of the French war in Algeria

Algerian War

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Fought between France and the Algerian National Liberation Front from 1954 to 1962, which led to Algeria winning its independence from France.

Fought between France and the Algerian National Liberation Front from 1954 to 1962, which led to Algeria winning its independence from France.

Collage of the French war in Algeria
Battle of Somah in 1836
Arrival of Marshal Randon in Algiers in 1857
Algerian rebel fighters in the mountains
National Liberation Army soldiers
Houari Boumediène, the leader of the National Liberation Army and future President of Algeria, during the war
The six historical Leaders of the FLN: Rabah Bitat, Mostefa Ben Boulaïd, Mourad Didouche, Mohammed Boudiaf, Krim Belkacem and Larbi Ben M'Hidi.
Algiers: Muslim quarters (green), European quarters (orange), terrorist attacks
Electrified barriers along the entire length of Algeria's eastern and western borders
Barricades in Algiers, January 1960. The banner reads, "Long live Massu" (Vive Massu).
FLN female bombers
Commandos de Chasse of the 4th Zouave regiment. Zouave regiments were mostly composed of European settlers.
Young Harki in uniform, summer 1961
Ex-voto in Notre-Dame de la Garde thanking for the safe return of a son from Algeria, August 1958
French North African Operations medal, 11 January 1958
Former FLN member Saadi Yacef starred and co-produced The Battle of Algiers (1966) by Italian filmmaker Gillo Pontecorvo, which was critically acclaimed for its sense of historical authenticity and cast who had lived through the real war.

France opposed Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser's material and political assistance to the FLN, which some French analysts believed was the revolution's main sustenance.

Voice of the Arabs

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One of the first and most prominent Egyptian transnational Arabic-language radio services.

One of the first and most prominent Egyptian transnational Arabic-language radio services.

Based in Cairo, the service became known to many Arabs and non-alike, as the main medium through which former Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser spread his messages on Arab unity and revolutions across the Arab world.

President of Egypt Gamal Abdel Nasser receiving the Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, c. February 1955

Egypt–India relations

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Egypt–India relations are bilateral relations between Egypt and India.

Egypt–India relations are bilateral relations between Egypt and India.

President of Egypt Gamal Abdel Nasser receiving the Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, c. February 1955

In 1955, Egypt under Gamal Abdel Nasser and India under Jawaharlal Nehru became the founders of the Non-Aligned Movement.

Abdel Hamid al-Sarraj, 1958

Abdel Hamid al-Sarraj

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Syrian Army officer and politician.

Syrian Army officer and politician.

Abdel Hamid al-Sarraj, 1958
Sarraj (centre) with army comrades, Mohammad Attura (left) and Abdel Salam al-Ujyali (right), at the battlefront in Palestine, 1948
Sarraj (right) with UAR President Gamal Abdel Nasser in Latakia, March 1959
Sarraj in 1960

When the union between Egypt and Syria was declared, Sarraj, a staunch Arab nationalist and supporter of Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser, played a key role in the leadership of the Syrian region of the UAR.

Free Princes Movement

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Saudi liberal political movement that existed from 1958 to 1964.

Saudi liberal political movement that existed from 1958 to 1964.

It was heavily idealized around the iconic figure of Gamal Abdel Nasser and his pan-Arab nationalism.

Umm Kulthum

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Egyptian singer, songwriter, and film actress active from the 1920s to the 1970s.

Egyptian singer, songwriter, and film actress active from the 1920s to the 1970s.

Umm Kulthum as a toddler, with her father Ibrahim El Beltagi
Poster advertising Umm Kulthum's concert in Jerusalem, Mandatory Palestine. 1 January 1930
Umm Kulthum with some of the most prominent names in Egyptian classical music. From left: Riad Al Sunbati, Mohamed El Qasabgi, Farid al-Atrash and Zakariya Ahmad.
Funeral procession for Umm Kulthum
Umm Kulthum in Life Magazine, 1962
Monument to Umm Kulthum in Zamalek, Cairo; it is located on the site of the singer's former house
Umm Kulthum greeting filmmaker Mahmoud Zulfikar in Cairo, 1958
Umm Kulthum meeting President Gamal Abdel Nasser, Speaker of the Parliament Anwar Sadat and Music composer Mohamed El-Mougui

Among the army men trapped were the figures who were going to lead the bloodless revolution of 23 July 1952, prominently Gamal Abdel Nasser.

The 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession in Washington, D.C., was initiated and organized by suffrage leader Alice Paul.

Women's suffrage

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Right of women to vote in elections.

Right of women to vote in elections.

The 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession in Washington, D.C., was initiated and organized by suffrage leader Alice Paul.
Anna II, Abbess of Quedlinburg. In the pre-modern era in some parts of Europe, abbesses were permitted to participate and vote in various European national assemblies by virtue of their rank within the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches.
South Australian suffragist Catherine Helen Spence stood for office in 1897. In a first for the modern world, South Australia granted women the right to stand for Parliament in 1895.
Marie Stritt (1855–1928), German suffragist, co-founder of the International Alliance of Women
French pro-suffrage poster, 1934
After selling her home, British activist Emmeline Pankhurst travelled constantly, giving speeches throughout Britain and the United States. One of her most famous speeches, Freedom or death, was delivered in Connecticut in 1913.
Women voting in Kabul at the first presidential election (October 2004) in Afghan history
1963 Iranian legislative election
Women's Rights meeting in Tokyo, to push for women's suffrage
Philippine President Manuel L. Quezon signing the Women's Suffrage Bill following the 1937 plebiscite
Savka Dabčević-Kučar, Croatian Spring participant; Europe's first female prime minister
Jane Brigode, Belgian suffragist, around 1910
Line luplau seen in the foreground on her daughter Marie Luplau's large group portrait painting From the Early Days of the Fight for Women's Suffrage (1897).
13 of the total of 19 female MPs, who were the first female MPs in the world, elected in Finland's parliamentary elections in 1907
Wilhelmina Drucker, a Dutch pioneer for women's rights, is portrayed by Truus Claes in 1917 on the occasion of her seventieth birthday.
The first Norwegian woman voter casts her ballot in the 1910 municipal election.
A 1917 demonstration in Petrograd. The plaque says (in Russian): "Without the participation of women, election is not universal!"
Women exercising the right to vote during the Second Spanish Republic, November 5, 1933
The Swedish writer Maria Gustava Gyllenstierna (1672–1737); as a taxpaying property owner, and a woman of legal majority due to her widowed status, she belonged to the women granted suffrage in accordance with the constitution of the age of liberty (1718–1772).
Swedish suffragist Signe Bergman, around 1910
Women's suffrage demonstration in Gothenburg, June 1918
Eighteen female MPs joined the Turkish Parliament in 1935
A British cartoon speculating on why imprisoned suffragettes refused to eat in prison
Constance Markievicz was the first woman elected to the British House of Commons in 1918, but as an Irish nationalist she did not take her seat, instead joining the First Dáil. In 1919 she was appointed Minister for Labour, the first female minister in a democratic government cabinet.
Australian women's rights were lampooned in this 1887 Melbourne Punch cartoon: A hypothetical female member foists her baby's care on the House Speaker. South Australian women were to achieve the vote in 1895.
Edith Cowan (1861–1932) was elected to the Western Australian Legislative Assembly in 1921 and was the first woman elected to any Australian Parliament (though women in Australia had already had the vote for two decades).
Women's demonstration in Buenos Aires in front of the National Congress by law for universal suffrage, 1947
Eva Perón voting at the hospital in 1951. It was the first time women had been permitted to vote in national elections in Argentina. To this end Perón received the Civic Book No. 00.000.001. It was the first and only time she would vote; Perón died July 26, 1952, after developing cervical cancer.
First women electors of Brazil, Rio Grande do Norte, 1928.
Program for Woman Suffrage Procession, Washington, D.C., March 3, 1913
"Kaiser Wilson" banner held by a woman who picketed the White House
Toledo Woman Suffrage Association, Toledo, Ohio, 1912
The Silent Sentinels, women suffragists picketing in front of the White House circa February 1917. Banner on the left reads, "Mr President, How long must women wait for Liberty?", and the banner to the right, "Mr President, What will you do for women's suffrage?"

President Gamal Abdel-Nasser supported women's suffrage in 1956 after they were denied the vote under the British occupation.

The main parties in the Arab–Israeli conflict

Arab–Israeli conflict

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Ongoing intercommunal phenomenon involving political tension, military conflicts, and other disputes between Arab countries and Israel, which escalated during the 20th century, but had mostly faded out by the early 21st century.

Ongoing intercommunal phenomenon involving political tension, military conflicts, and other disputes between Arab countries and Israel, which escalated during the 20th century, but had mostly faded out by the early 21st century.

The main parties in the Arab–Israeli conflict
A Jewish bus equipped with wire screens to protect against rock, glass, and grenade throwing, late 1930s
Egyptian forces crossing the Suez Canal on 7 October 1973
Begin, Carter and Sadat at Camp David
Yitzhak Rabin, Bill Clinton, and Yasser Arafat at the Oslo Accords signing ceremony on 13 September 1993
Israel and Palestine
Recognition of only Israel
Recognition of Israel, with some relations to Palestine
Recognition of both Israel and Palestine
Recognition of Palestine, with some relations to Israel
Recognition of only Palestine
No data

The war ended following Gamal Abdel Nasser's death in 1970.