GameCube

Nintendo GameCubeGCNGCGameCube controllermemory cardsBorn to PlayDolphinDolphin OSFlipperGame Cube
The Nintendo GameCube (commonly abbreviated as GameCube, model number: DOL ) is a home video game console released by Nintendo in Japan and North America in 2001 and Europe and Australia in 2002.wikipedia
2,047 Related Articles

Sixth generation of video game consoles

sixth generationSixth generation erasixth
The sixth-generation console is the successor to the Nintendo 64. Partnering with Nintendo in 1998, ArtX began the complete design of the system logic and of the graphics processor (codenamed "Flipper") of Nintendo's sixth-generation video game console, reportedly bearing the early internal code name of "N2000". Nintendo unveiled its software lineup for the sixth-generation console at E3 2001, focusing on fifteen launch games, including Luigi's Mansion and Star Wars Rogue Squadron II: Rogue Leader.
Platforms in the sixth generation include consoles from four companies: the Sega Dreamcast (DC), Sony PlayStation 2 (PS2), Nintendo GameCube (GC), and Microsoft Xbox.

Nintendo 64

N64Ultra 64.mpk
The sixth-generation console is the successor to the Nintendo 64.
The Nintendo 64 was discontinued in early-mid 2002 following the launch of its successor, the GameCube, in 2001.

Dreamcast

Sega DreamcastDCDreamcast Microphone
It competed with Sony's PlayStation 2, Microsoft's Xbox, and Sega's Dreamcast.
It was the first in the sixth generation of video game consoles, preceding Sony's PlayStation 2, Nintendo's GameCube and Microsoft's Xbox.

Xbox (console)

XboxMicrosoft Xboxoriginal Xbox
It competed with Sony's PlayStation 2, Microsoft's Xbox, and Sega's Dreamcast.
It is classified as a sixth generation console, competing with Sony's PlayStation 2 and Nintendo's GameCube.

PlayStation 2

PS2Sony PlayStation 2PlayStation
It competed with Sony's PlayStation 2, Microsoft's Xbox, and Sega's Dreamcast.
A sixth-generation console, it competed with Sega's Dreamcast, Nintendo's GameCube, and Microsoft's original Xbox.

Home video game console

home consoleconsolehome video game consoles
The Nintendo GameCube (commonly abbreviated as GameCube, model number: DOL ) is a home video game console released by Nintendo in Japan and North America in 2001 and Europe and Australia in 2002.
Nintendo's GameCube was released in Japan on September 15, 2001, in North America on November 18, 2001, in Europe on May 3, 2002 and in Australia on May 17, 2002.

GameCube – Game Boy Advance link cable

Nintendo GameCube – Game Boy Advance link cableNintendo GameCube Game Boy Advance CableGameCube - Game Boy Advance link cable
The console supports limited online gaming for a small number of games via a GameCube broadband or modem adapter and can connect to a Game Boy Advance with a link cable, which allows players to access exclusive in-game features using the handheld as a second screen and controller. Certain games, such as The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures and Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, can use the handheld as a secondary screen and controller when connected to the console via a link cable.
The Nintendo GameCube Game Boy Advance cable (DOL-011) is a cable used to connect the Game Boy Advance (GBA) to the GameCube (GCN).

Nintendo

Nintendo of AmericaNintendo.comNintendo of Europe
The Nintendo GameCube (commonly abbreviated as GameCube, model number: DOL ) is a home video game console released by Nintendo in Japan and North America in 2001 and Europe and Australia in 2002.
Nintendo saw an opportunity for the new studio to create games for the upcoming GameCube targeting an older demographic, in the same vein as Iguana Entertainment's successful Turok series for the Nintendo 64.

Game Boy Advance

GBAAdvanceNintendo Game Boy Advance
The console supports limited online gaming for a small number of games via a GameCube broadband or modem adapter and can connect to a Game Boy Advance with a link cable, which allows players to access exclusive in-game features using the handheld as a second screen and controller.
Simultaneously, Nintendo announced a partnership with Konami to form Mobile 21, a development studio that would focus on creating technology for the GBA to interact with the Dolphin, Nintendo's home console which was also in development at the time.

GameCube technical specifications

FlipperNintendo GameCube videogame console
Partnering with Nintendo in 1998, ArtX began the complete design of the system logic and of the graphics processor (codenamed "Flipper") of Nintendo's sixth-generation video game console, reportedly bearing the early internal code name of "N2000".
Nintendo originally offered a digital video output on early GameCube models.

Luigi's Mansion

Luigi's Ghost MansionLuigi's Mansion (3DS)Ms. Petunia
Nintendo unveiled its software lineup for the sixth-generation console at E3 2001, focusing on fifteen launch games, including Luigi's Mansion and Star Wars Rogue Squadron II: Rogue Leader.
Luigi's Mansion is a 2001 action-adventure video game developed and published by Nintendo for the GameCube.

Star Wars: Rogue Squadron II – Rogue Leader

Star Wars Rogue Squadron II: Rogue LeaderStar Wars: Rogue Squadron II: Rogue LeaderRogue Squadron II
Nintendo unveiled its software lineup for the sixth-generation console at E3 2001, focusing on fifteen launch games, including Luigi's Mansion and Star Wars Rogue Squadron II: Rogue Leader.
Star Wars: Rogue Squadron II – Rogue Leader (also known as Star Wars: Rogue Leader – Rogue Squadron II) is an action game co-developed by Factor 5 and LucasArts and is the second of three games in the Rogue Squadron series, it was published by LucasArts and released as a launch title for the GameCube in North America on November 9, 2001 and Europe on May 3, 2002.

Action Replay

Pro Action ReplayCodeJunkiesAction Replay DS
The newer model has firmware that disables Action Replay cheats and cheat codes and the disc-reading laser was improved in many ways, though it is not as durable.
The Action Replay is available for many gaming systems including the Nintendo DS, Nintendo DSi, Nintendo 3DS, PlayStation Portable, PlayStation 2, GameCube, Game Boy Advance, and the Xbox.

Retro Studios

Action-Adventure
Subsequently, Nintendo began providing development kits to game developers such as Rare and Retro Studios.
Retro was founded on September 21, 1998, as an alliance between Nintendo and Iguana Entertainment founder Jeff Spangenberg, hoping to create titles for the then-upcoming GameCube aiming at an older demographic.

Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles

Crystal ChroniclesFinal Fantasy: Crystal ChroniclesCrystal Chronicles'' series
Certain games, such as The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures and Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, can use the handheld as a secondary screen and controller when connected to the console via a link cable.
Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles is an action role-playing game developed by The Game Designers Studio and published for the GameCube by Nintendo in 2003 in Japan; and 2004 in North America, Europe and Australia.

Wii Remote

NunchukWiimoteWii Remote Plus
These motion control concepts would not be deployed to consumers for several years, until the Wii Remote.
Sources also indicate that the Wii Remote was originally in development as a controller for the Nintendo GameCube, rather than the Wii.

The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures

Four Swords AdventuresThe Legend of Zelda: Four Swords AdventureLegend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures, The
Certain games, such as The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures and Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, can use the handheld as a secondary screen and controller when connected to the console via a link cable.
It was released for the Nintendo GameCube home video game console in Japan on March 18, 2004; in North America on June 7, 2004; in Europe on January 7, 2005; and in Australia on April 7, 2005.

ATI Technologies

ATIATI Technologies Inc.ACTI Tech
ArtX was acquired by ATI in April 2000, whereupon the Flipper graphics processor design had already been mostly completed by ArtX and was not overtly influenced by ATI.
In 2000, ATI acquired ArtX, which engineered the Flipper graphics chip used in the Nintendo GameCube game console.

Nintendo DS

DSNDSDS Download Play
In February 2007, Nintendo announced that it had ceased first-party support for the GameCube and that the console had been discontinued, as it was shifting its manufacturing and development efforts towards the Wii and Nintendo DS.
Prior to its release, the Nintendo DS was marketed as an experimental, "third pillar" in Nintendo's console lineup, meant to complement the Game Boy Advance and GameCube.

MiniDVD

8 cmMini DVD80 mm discs
The discs are in the miniDVD format and the system was not designed to play full-sized DVDs or audio CDs, unlike its competitors, and focused on gaming instead.
Nintendo used a disc-based format for their GameCube system, which is a variant of an 8 cm DVD.

Super Mario

MarioSuper Mario'' seriesSuper Mushroom
It is also the first Nintendo console since the Famicom not to accompany a Super Mario platform game at launch.
A later Super Mario All-Stars Wii port, titled Super Mario All-Stars 25th Anniversary Edition, features the SNES gameplay and adds Wii Remote, Classic Controller, and GameCube controller compatibility.

64DD

Nintendo 64DDRandnetdisk drive add-on
The Famicom Data Recorder, Famicom Disk System, SNES-CD, and 64DD had explored various complementary storage technologies, but the GameCube was Nintendo's first console to move away from cartridge-based media altogether.
With the decline of the 64DD's commercial viability, most such games were ultimately delivered on Nintendo 64 cartridges alone, ported to other consoles like the GameCube, or canceled altogether.

Seventh generation of video game consoles

seventh generationSeventh generation eraseventh generation consoles
Its successor, the seventh-generation Wii (some models of which have backward compatibility with most GameCube software), was released in November 2006.
Early models of the Wii are fully backwards compatible with GameCube software and most of its accessories; the Wii Family Edition and the Wii Mini iterations lack GameCube support.

Gekko (microprocessor)

Gekko
IBM designed a PowerPC-based processor with custom architectural extensions for the next-generation console, known as Gekko, which runs at 485 MHz and features a floating point unit (FPU) capable of 1.9 GFLOPS.
Gekko is a superscalar out-of-order 32-bit PowerPC microprocessor custom-made by IBM in 2000 for Nintendo to use as the CPU in their sixth generation game console, the Nintendo GameCube, and later the Triforce Arcade Board.

PowerPC

PPCPower PCPowerPC 2.02
IBM designed a PowerPC-based processor with custom architectural extensions for the next-generation console, known as Gekko, which runs at 485 MHz and features a floating point unit (FPU) capable of 1.9 GFLOPS.
Around the same time, IBM exited the 32-bit embedded processor market by selling its line of PowerPC products to Applied Micro Circuits Corporation (AMCC) and focusing on 64-bit chip designs, while maintaining its commitment of PowerPC CPUs toward game console makers such as Nintendo's GameCube and Wii, Sony's PlayStation 3 and Microsoft's Xbox 360, of which the latter two both use 64-bit processors.