Gammon (meat)

gammongammon steakgammon, egg and chipsgammonsglazed ham
Gammon is a British name for the hind leg of pork after it has been cured by dry-salting or brining, and it may or may not be smoked.wikipedia
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Pork

pig meatpigpigs
Gammon is a British name for the hind leg of pork after it has been cured by dry-salting or brining, and it may or may not be smoked.
Ham, smoked pork, gammon, bacon and sausage are examples of preserved pork.

Ham

dry-cured hamsmoked hamdry-cured
Unlike most ham, but like bacon, it must be cooked before it is safe to eat.
In the United Kingdom, a pork leg cut, either whole or sliced, that has been cured but requires additional cooking is known as gammon.

Gammon (insult)

Gammon
Gammon (insult)
The term is a comparison of their flushed skin colour to the pink of gammon, i.e. salted pork leg.

British English

BritishEnglishUK
Gammon is a British name for the hind leg of pork after it has been cured by dry-salting or brining, and it may or may not be smoked.

Curing (food preservation)

curedcuringcured meat
Gammon is a British name for the hind leg of pork after it has been cured by dry-salting or brining, and it may or may not be smoked.

Salting (food)

saltingsaltedsaltery
Gammon is a British name for the hind leg of pork after it has been cured by dry-salting or brining, and it may or may not be smoked.

Brining

brinebrinedbrine-washed
Gammon is a British name for the hind leg of pork after it has been cured by dry-salting or brining, and it may or may not be smoked.

Smoking (cooking)

smokedsmokingsmoke
Gammon is a British name for the hind leg of pork after it has been cured by dry-salting or brining, and it may or may not be smoked.

Bacon

bacon bitsrashersstreaky bacon
Unlike most ham, but like bacon, it must be cooked before it is safe to eat.

Swedish language

SwedishSwedish-languageSwedish-speaking
As such, it is the same as Swedish julskinka, Finnish joulukinkku, Dutch beenham, German beinschinken, or Australian English Christmas ham.

Finnish language

FinnishFinnish-languagefi
As such, it is the same as Swedish julskinka, Finnish joulukinkku, Dutch beenham, German beinschinken, or Australian English Christmas ham.

Dutch language

DutchDutch-languagenl
As such, it is the same as Swedish julskinka, Finnish joulukinkku, Dutch beenham, German beinschinken, or Australian English Christmas ham.

German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
As such, it is the same as Swedish julskinka, Finnish joulukinkku, Dutch beenham, German beinschinken, or Australian English Christmas ham.

Australian English

EnglishAustralianAustralia
As such, it is the same as Swedish julskinka, Finnish joulukinkku, Dutch beenham, German beinschinken, or Australian English Christmas ham.

Ham hock

hockslegpork hock
Ham hock, gammon hock, or knuckle, is the foot end of the joint, and contains more connective tissue and sinew.

Connective tissue

fibrous tissuefibrous connective tissueconnective
Ham hock, gammon hock, or knuckle, is the foot end of the joint, and contains more connective tissue and sinew.

Tendon

tendonssinewtendinous
Ham hock, gammon hock, or knuckle, is the foot end of the joint, and contains more connective tissue and sinew.

United Kingdom

British🇬🇧UK
In Britain, joints of cooked gammon are often served at Christmas or on Boxing Day.

Christmas

Christmas DayDecember 25Nativity
In Britain, joints of cooked gammon are often served at Christmas or on Boxing Day.

Boxing Day

26 DecemberBoxing NightDecember 26
In Britain, joints of cooked gammon are often served at Christmas or on Boxing Day.

Middle English

EnglishMiddlelate Middle English
The word 'gammon' is derived from the Middle English word for 'ham', gambon attested since the early 15th century and itself derived from Old North French gambon ('ham'), itself derived from Old French jambon ('ham') which is identical to the Modern French word for 'ham', jambon.

Old French

Frenchmedieval FrenchOF
The word 'gammon' is derived from the Middle English word for 'ham', gambon attested since the early 15th century and itself derived from Old North French gambon ('ham'), itself derived from Old French jambon ('ham') which is identical to the Modern French word for 'ham', jambon.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
The word 'gammon' is derived from the Middle English word for 'ham', gambon attested since the early 15th century and itself derived from Old North French gambon ('ham'), itself derived from Old French jambon ('ham') which is identical to the Modern French word for 'ham', jambon.

Late Latin

Latinancient Latinlow Latin
Old French jambon is attested since the 13th century and is derived from Old French jambe (gambe in Old North French) which in turn is derived from the Late Latin gamba, meaning 'leg/hock of a horse/animal', which can ultimately be traced to Greek kampe meaning 'a bending/a joint'.