Ganapati Atharvashirsa

Ganapati UpanishadGanapati AtharvashirshaGaṇapati
The Ganapati Atharvashirsa is a Sanskrit text and a minor Upanishad of Hinduism.wikipedia
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Ganesha

GaneshVinayakaLord Ganesha
It is a late Upanishadic text that asserts that Ganesha is same as the ultimate reality, Brahman. It is part of the five Atharva Shiras Upanishads, each of which are named after the five main deities or shrines (panchayatanan of the Smarta tradition) of Ganapati, Narayana, Rudra, Surya and Devi.
The principal texts on Ganesha include the Ganesha Purana, the Mudgala Purana, and the Ganapati Atharvashirsa.

Upanishads

UpanishadUpanishadicUpanisads
The Ganapati Atharvashirsa is a Sanskrit text and a minor Upanishad of Hinduism.

Muktikā

MuktikaSamanyaMuktika Upanishad
The Ganapati Upanishad text is listed at number 89 in the Muktikā canon of 108 Upanishads compiled in the mid 17th century, and also mentioned c. 1800 by Upanishad Brahmayogin in his commentary on the Muktika canon.

Muladhara

Muladhara Chakrabase chakraMoolatharam
Some evidence that the work is of late origin is its integration of Tantric ideas which associate Ganapati with the Muladhara chakra:
In the highest revered prayer for Ganapati, the Ganapati Atharvashirsha, it is mentioned that "one who worships Lord Ganapati would easily grasp the concept and realise Brahman".

Ganesha Purana

GaneshaThe Ganesha Gita
This bija mantra is also used in the Ganesha Purana which is generally dated as preceding the Ganapati Atharvasirsa.
The Ganesha Purana is significant because it is, with Ganapati Upanishad, the two most important texts of the Ganapatya sect of Hinduism.

Hinduism

HinduHindusHindu culture
The Ganapati Atharvashirsa is a Sanskrit text and a minor Upanishad of Hinduism.

Brahman

BrahmBrahmaBrahmam
It is a late Upanishadic text that asserts that Ganesha is same as the ultimate reality, Brahman.

Satcitananda

SatchitanandaSat-Chit-AnandaSatchidananda
Ganesha is described to be same as other Hindu gods, as ultimate truth and reality (Brahman), as satcitananda, as the soul in oneself (Atman) and in every living being, as Om. The verses state Ganesha to be all that is spiritual, the satcitananda, all words, all four levels of speech, all knowledge, all consciousness, the source of all universe, the universe now, that in which the universe will someday be dissolved, the three Guṇas of Samkhya philosophy and what is beyond, all states of being, the truth, the oneness, the contentment, the inner bliss.

Om

AumPranava
Ganesha is described to be same as other Hindu gods, as ultimate truth and reality (Brahman), as satcitananda, as the soul in oneself (Atman) and in every living being, as Om.

Rigveda

Rig VedaRigvedicRig-Veda
While the Upanishad is a late text, the earliest mention of the word Ganapati is found in hymn 2.23.1 of the 2nd-millennium BCE Rigveda.

Upanishad Brahmayogin

The Ganapati Upanishad text is listed at number 89 in the Muktikā canon of 108 Upanishads compiled in the mid 17th century, and also mentioned c. 1800 by Upanishad Brahmayogin in his commentary on the Muktika canon.

Textual criticism

critical editiontextual scholarstextual critic
A critical edition was published in 1984 by Gudrun Bühnemann with a translation.

Vans Kennedy

A heavily edited and abbreviated translation was made in the early nineteenth century by Vans Kennedy.

Narayana

NarayanLord NarayanaNārāyaṇa
It is part of the five Atharva Shiras Upanishads, each of which are named after the five main deities or shrines (panchayatanan of the Smarta tradition) of Ganapati, Narayana, Rudra, Surya and Devi.

Rudra

KidlatLord RudraRudrá
It is part of the five Atharva Shiras Upanishads, each of which are named after the five main deities or shrines (panchayatanan of the Smarta tradition) of Ganapati, Narayana, Rudra, Surya and Devi.

Surya

SunSun GodSūrya
It is part of the five Atharva Shiras Upanishads, each of which are named after the five main deities or shrines (panchayatanan of the Smarta tradition) of Ganapati, Narayana, Rudra, Surya and Devi.

Devi

Hindu goddessgoddessDevī
It is part of the five Atharva Shiras Upanishads, each of which are named after the five main deities or shrines (panchayatanan of the Smarta tradition) of Ganapati, Narayana, Rudra, Surya and Devi.

Chandogya Upanishad

Chāndogya UpaniṣadChandogyaChhandogya
Ganesha is asserted by the text as identical to Om, the Brahman, the Atman or soul, and as the visible manifestation of the Vedic idea Tat tvam asi (you are that) found in the sixth chapter of the Chandogya Upanishad, in a manner similar to Shiva in Shaiva Upanishads, Vishnu in Vaishnava Upanishads, Devi in Shakti Upanishads.

Mantra

mantrasmantrammantric
You are the manifestation of the mantra "". This text provides a detailed description of Ganesha's bija mantra (Sanskrit: गं; ).

Guṇa

gunaGunascharacteristics
The verses state Ganesha to be all that is spiritual, the satcitananda, all words, all four levels of speech, all knowledge, all consciousness, the source of all universe, the universe now, that in which the universe will someday be dissolved, the three Guṇas of Samkhya philosophy and what is beyond, all states of being, the truth, the oneness, the contentment, the inner bliss.

Samkhya

SankhyaSāṃkhyaSāṅkhya
The verses state Ganesha to be all that is spiritual, the satcitananda, all words, all four levels of speech, all knowledge, all consciousness, the source of all universe, the universe now, that in which the universe will someday be dissolved, the three Guṇas of Samkhya philosophy and what is beyond, all states of being, the truth, the oneness, the contentment, the inner bliss.

Sanskrit

Sanskrit languageClassical SanskritSkt.
This text provides a detailed description of Ganesha's bija mantra (Sanskrit: गं; ). The text associates itself with the Atharvaveda, in a passage that Chinmayananda translates as "Thus says Atharvana" (Sanskrit:इत्यथर्वणवाक्यम्; ).

Bījā

bijaBījaseed syllable
This bija mantra is also used in the Ganesha Purana which is generally dated as preceding the Ganapati Atharvasirsa.

Atharvaveda

Atharva VedaAtharva-VedaAtharva
The text associates itself with the Atharvaveda, in a passage that Chinmayananda translates as "Thus says Atharvana" (Sanskrit:इत्यथर्वणवाक्यम्; ).

Chinmayananda Saraswati

Swami ChinmayanandaChinmayanandaChinmaya
The text associates itself with the Atharvaveda, in a passage that Chinmayananda translates as "Thus says Atharvana" (Sanskrit:इत्यथर्वणवाक्यम्; ).