Gao Jiong

Gāo Jiǒng (died August 27, 607 courtesy name Zhaoxuan, alternative name Min known during the Northern Zhou period by the Xianbei name Dugu Jiong, was a key official and general of the Chinese Sui Dynasty. He was a key advisor to Emperor Wen of Sui and instrumental in the campaign against rival the Chen Dynasty, allowing Sui to destroy Chen in 589 and reunify China. In 607, he offended Emperor Wen's son Emperor Yang of Sui (Yang Guang) by criticizing Emperor Yang's large rewards to Tujue's submissive Qimin Khan and was executed by Emperor Yang.wikipedia
69 Related Articles

Emperor Yang of Sui

Emperor YangYang GuangYángdi
In 607, he offended Emperor Wen's son Emperor Yang of Sui (Yang Guang) by criticizing Emperor Yang's large rewards to Tujue's submissive Qimin Khan and was executed by Emperor Yang. He made Yang Su and his sons Yang Guang the Prince of Jin and Yang Jun the Prince of Qin the commanders of the three main prongs of the operation, with Yang Guang in overall command.
The key official Gao Jiong served as Yang Guang's assistant.

Emperor Wen of Sui

Emperor WenYang JianWéndi
He was a key advisor to Emperor Wen of Sui and instrumental in the campaign against rival the Chen Dynasty, allowing Sui to destroy Chen in 589 and reunify China.
He entrusted most of the important governmental matters to his officials Gao Jiong, Yang Su, and Su Wei.

Dugu Qieluo

Empress DuguDuchess Dugu QieluoDugu Jialuo
Because of this connection, after Dugu Xin was forced to commit suicide in 557 after the founding of Western Wei's successor state Northern Zhou, Dugu Xin's daughter Dugu Qieluo often visited Gao Bin's home.
She respected the official Gao Jiong, as Gao Jiong's father Gao Bin served on her father's staff and was a trusted advisor for him.

Kaihuang Code

He was created the Duke of Bohai, and few officials could rival him in terms of Emperor Wen's trust, shown by Gao's appointment as one of the officials in charge of the hengy legal reforms enacted in the Kaihuang Code.
He ordered Gao Jiong and other senior ministers including Yang Su, Zheng Yi, Su Wei and Pei Zheng along with 14 other individuals to make extensive use of the meritorious laws of Cao Wei as well as the Jin, Qi and Liang Dynasties.

Legalism (Chinese philosophy)

LegalismLegalistChinese Legalism
Quoting Arthur Wright, author Hengy Chye Kiang calls Gao Jiong "'a man of practical statecraft" recalling the great Legalist statesmen.
Quoting Arthur Wright, Author Hengy Chye Kiang calls the Sui dynasty a "strong autocratic power with a penchant for Legalist philosophy," and its prime minister Gao Jiong "a man of practical statecraft" recalling the great Legalist statesmen.

Su Wei (politician)

Su Wei
Gao recommended Su Wei to Emperor Wen, and Emperor Wen trusted Su as well, eventually promoting Su to be co-prime minister.
As one of Yang's close advisors, Gao Jiong, had long praised Su for his abilities, Yang invited Su to join his staff.

Yang Yong (Sui dynasty)

Yang Yongelder brother
He also gave a daughter of his son and crown prince Yang Yong to Gao's son Gao Biaoren in marriage.
In summer 581, Yang Yong's chief of staff Lu Ben, trying to exploit this situation to gain Yang Yong's favor, tried to get Yang Yong involved in his plot to, jointly with several other officials, take over power from Emperor Wen's favored officials Gao Jiong and Su Wei.

Yang Su

He made Yang Su and his sons Yang Guang the Prince of Jin and Yang Jun the Prince of Qin the commanders of the three main prongs of the operation, with Yang Guang in overall command.
Around the new year 593, Yang Su was made a co-head of the executive bureau (尚書省, Shangshu Sheng) with Gao Jiong, effectively serving as co-prime ministers, replacing Su Wei in that role.

Xiao Cong

Emperor Jing of Western LiangEmperor JingXiao Jing Di
In 587, while Sui's vassal Emperor Jing of Western Liang was at Daxing, Emperor Jing's uncle Xiao Yan and brother Xiao Huan, in charge of his capital Jiangling, feared that the Sui general Cui Hongdu was going attack, and therefore took the people of Jiangling and surrendered to the Chen general Chen Huiji (陳慧紀, the cousin of Chen's emperor Chen Shubao).
He sent his official Gao Jiong to Jiangling to pacify the people who remained and to post guards to tend to the tombs of Emperor Ming and Emperor Ming's father Emperor Xuan.

Zhang Lihua

Consort Zhang LihuaGuifei
When Chen's capital Jiankang fell in spring 589 and the emperor Chen Shubao was captured, Yang Guang ordered that Chen Shubao's concubine Consort Zhang Lihua be spared—perhaps because he wanted to take Consort Zhang as his own concubine.
Chen Shubao was spared (and eventually treated with kindness by Emperor Wen of Sui), as were Chen Yuan and Chen Zhuang, but the Sui general Gao Jiong, blaming her for Chen's collapse and comparing her to Daji, the wicked wife of King Zhou of Shang who was beheaded by the Zhou dynasty general Jiang Ziya after Zhou conquered Shang, beheaded her despite an order from Emperor Wen's son Yang Guang the Prince of Jin, who commanded the entire operation, to spare her.

Chen Shubao

Houzhu
In 587, while Sui's vassal Emperor Jing of Western Liang was at Daxing, Emperor Jing's uncle Xiao Yan and brother Xiao Huan, in charge of his capital Jiangling, feared that the Sui general Cui Hongdu was going attack, and therefore took the people of Jiangling and surrendered to the Chen general Chen Huiji (陳慧紀, the cousin of Chen's emperor Chen Shubao).
By winter 588, the Sui attack was in full operation, with three major prongs commanded by Emperor Wen's sons, Yang Guang (later Emperor Yang of Sui) and Yang Jun, and Yang Su, and with Yang Guang in overall command of the operation, assisted by Gao Jiong.

Book of Sui

Sui ShuSuishudynastic history of Sui
The Book of Sui commented, about Gao:

Yang Liang

Sui war of succession
In 598, angry that Ying Province (營州, roughly modern Zhaoyang, Liaoning) had been attacked by Goguryeo, Emperor Wen send his son Yang Liang and the general Wang Shiji to attack Goguryeo—a campaign that Gao tried to dissuade Emperor Wen from but Emperor Wen launched anyway, and in fact forced Gao to serve as Yang Liang's deputy.
(During the campaign, the general Gao Jiong served as Yang Liang's lieutenant, and, due to his senior status, often disobeyed the young Yang Liang, causing Yang Liang to be so displeased that he complained to his mother Empress Dugu, further straining the relationship between Empress Dugu and Gao over Gao's refusal to endorse Yang Guang, her favorite son, as crown prince, and in 599, at Empress Dugu's urging, Emperor Wen removed Gao from his post.)

Li Delin

However, when Emperor Wen wanted to create the official Li Delin a duke as well for his contributions, as Gao had consulted Li during the campaign, Gao persuaded Emperor Wen not to, apparently out of jealousy for Li.
Yu subsequently recommended to Emperor Wen that the members of Northern Zhou's imperial Yuwen clan be massacred—a suggestion that the other chief advisors to Emperor Wen, Gao Jiong and Yang Hui disagreed with but did not dare to openly oppose.

Courtesy name

style namestyledZi
Gāo Jiǒng (died August 27, 607 courtesy name Zhaoxuan, alternative name Min known during the Northern Zhou period by the Xianbei name Dugu Jiong, was a key official and general of the Chinese Sui Dynasty.

Northern Zhou

Northern Zhou dynastyZhou dynastyfrom China
Because of this connection, after Dugu Xin was forced to commit suicide in 557 after the founding of Western Wei's successor state Northern Zhou, Dugu Xin's daughter Dugu Qieluo often visited Gao Bin's home. Gāo Jiǒng (died August 27, 607 courtesy name Zhaoxuan, alternative name Min known during the Northern Zhou period by the Xianbei name Dugu Jiong, was a key official and general of the Chinese Sui Dynasty.

Xianbei

Xianbei languageXianbicolonised by Turkic people
Gāo Jiǒng (died August 27, 607 courtesy name Zhaoxuan, alternative name Min known during the Northern Zhou period by the Xianbei name Dugu Jiong, was a key official and general of the Chinese Sui Dynasty.

History of China

Chineseimperial Chinaancient China
Gāo Jiǒng (died August 27, 607 courtesy name Zhaoxuan, alternative name Min known during the Northern Zhou period by the Xianbei name Dugu Jiong, was a key official and general of the Chinese Sui Dynasty.

Sui dynasty

SuiSui ChinaSui Empire
Gāo Jiǒng (died August 27, 607 courtesy name Zhaoxuan, alternative name Min known during the Northern Zhou period by the Xianbei name Dugu Jiong, was a key official and general of the Chinese Sui Dynasty.

Chen dynasty

ChenSouthern Chen DynastyChen China
He was a key advisor to Emperor Wen of Sui and instrumental in the campaign against rival the Chen Dynasty, allowing Sui to destroy Chen in 589 and reunify China.

Göktürks

TujueGöktürkGokturks
In 607, he offended Emperor Wen's son Emperor Yang of Sui (Yang Guang) by criticizing Emperor Yang's large rewards to Tujue's submissive Qimin Khan and was executed by Emperor Yang.

Yami Qaghan

Qimin KhanTuli KhanQimin
In 607, he offended Emperor Wen's son Emperor Yang of Sui (Yang Guang) by criticizing Emperor Yang's large rewards to Tujue's submissive Qimin Khan and was executed by Emperor Yang.

Arthur F. Wright

Wright, Arthur F.Arthur WrightArthur Frederick Wright
Quoting Arthur Wright, author Hengy Chye Kiang calls Gao Jiong "'a man of practical statecraft" recalling the great Legalist statesmen.

Eastern Wei

Dong WeiEastern Wei dynastyEastern
His father Gao Bin was an official of Eastern Wei who, in 540, fearful of false accusations against him, fled to Western Wei.

Western Wei

Western Wei dynasty
His father Gao Bin was an official of Eastern Wei who, in 540, fearful of false accusations against him, fled to Western Wei.