Garage door opener

Overhead DoorGarage door controllersGarage Door Openers
A garage door opener is a motorized device that opens and closes garage doors controlled by switches on the garage wall.wikipedia
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Remote control

remote-controlledremoteinfrared remote control
Most also include a handheld radio remote control carried by the owner, which can be used to open and close the door from a short distance.
In some cases, remote controls allow a person to operate a device that they otherwise would not be able to reach, as when a garage door opener is triggered from outside or when a Digital Light Processing projector that is mounted on a high ceiling is controlled by a person from the floor level.

Garage door

doordoorsGarage Doors
A garage door opener is a motorized device that opens and closes garage doors controlled by switches on the garage wall.
A garage door is a large door on a garage that opens either manually or by an electric motor (a garage door opener).

Transmitter

radio transmittertransmittersradio transmitters
The first garage door opener remote controls were simple and consisted of a simple transmitter (the remote) and receiver which controlled the opener mechanism.
Transmitters are necessary component parts of all electronic devices that communicate by radio, such as radio and television broadcasting stations, cell phones, walkie-talkies, wireless computer networks, Bluetooth enabled devices, garage door openers, two-way radios in aircraft, ships, spacecraft, radar sets and navigational beacons.

Wireless

wireless communicationwireless communicationswireless internet
The second stage of the wireless garage door opener system solved the opening-the-neighbor's-garage-door problem.
Other examples of applications of radio wireless technology include GPS units, garage door openers, wireless computer mouse, keyboards and headsets, headphones, radio receivers, satellite television, broadcast television and cordless telephones.

Radio receiver

receiverreceiversRadios
The first garage door opener remote controls were simple and consisted of a simple transmitter (the remote) and receiver which controlled the opener mechanism.
It was used in a few shortwave receivers in the 1930s, and is used today in a few cheap high frequency applications such as walkie-talkies and garage door openers.

DIP switch

DIP switchesDIPset to play
The codes were typically set by eight to twelve DIP switches on the receiver and transmitter, so they allowed for
DIP switches were very commonly used to set security codes on garage door openers as well as on some early cordless phones.

Rolling code

code hopping
The third stage of garage door opener technology uses a frequency spectrum range between 300-400 MHz and rolling code (code hopping) technology to defeat code grabbers.
Such systems are typical in garage door openers and keyless car entry systems.

Craftsman (tools)

CraftsmanCraftsman tools
The following standards are used by units manufactured by Chamberlain (including LiftMaster and Craftsman):
Tool storage has typically been manufactured by Waterloo Industries ("706" model prefix), while Craftsman-branded garage door openers are manufactured by The Chamberlain Group ("139" model prefix).

Electric eye

electric-eye automatic doorselectronic eyelight beams
A requirement for redundant entrapment-prevention devices was added in 1993; such a system can use an electric eye, a door edge sensor, or any other device that provides equivalent protection by reversing the travel of the closing door if an object is detected in its path.
An example is the door safety system used on garage door openers that use a light transmitter and receiver at the bottom of the door to prevent closing if there is any obstruction in the way that breaks the light beam.

The Genie Company

Genie
The following standards are used by units manufactured by Overhead Door Corporation and its subsidiary The Genie Company:

Torsion spring

torsion balancetorsion pendulumtorsion coefficient
(Even manually operated garage doors have counterbalances; otherwise they would be too heavy for a person to open or close them.) In a typical design, torsion springs apply torque to a shaft, and that shaft applies a force to the garage door via steel counterbalance cables.

Roller chain

chainchain-drivenRoller chains
The trolley is pulled along the track by a chain, belt, or screw that turns when the motor is operated.

Belt (mechanical)

beltbelt drivebelts
The trolley is pulled along the track by a chain, belt, or screw that turns when the motor is operated.

Leadscrew

lead screwPower screwLeadscrews
The trolley is pulled along the track by a chain, belt, or screw that turns when the motor is operated.

Bomb

bombingbombingsbombs
This type of system was used to detonate remote bombs.

Replay attack

Freshnessreplayreplay attacks
An even more sophisticated method is known as a replay attack.

Land mobile radio system

Land Mobile RadioPrivate Land Mobile Radioland-mobile radio
The 315 MHz frequency range avoids interference from the land mobile radio system (LMRS) used by the U.S. military.

Chamberlain Group

The Chamberlain GroupChamberlainChamberlain Manufacturing Corp.
The following standards are used by units manufactured by Chamberlain (including LiftMaster and Craftsman):

Carbon monoxide

COcarbon monoxide (CO)carbon monoxide poisoning
More sophisticated features are also available, such as an integrated carbon monoxide sensor to open the door in case of the garage being flooded with exhaust fumes.

Personal identification number

PINPINsPIN code
This unit attaches to the outside of the garage door on the jamb and allows users to open and close their doors with the press of a finger, rather than creating a personal identification number (PIN).

Latchkey kid

latchkey childlatchkey kidslatch-key kid
This is especially helpful for families with children who may forget a code and are latchkey kids.

Solenoid

solenoidselectromechanical solenoidmagnetizing current loop

American National Standards Institute

ANSIAmerican Standards AssociationAmerican National Standard
In the United States, the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 1990 required that automatic residential garage door operators manufactured on or after 1 January 1991 conform to the entrapment protection requirements of the 1988 version of ANSI/UL standard 325.

UL (safety organization)

Underwriters LaboratoriesULUnderwriters Laboratory
In the United States, the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 1990 required that automatic residential garage door operators manufactured on or after 1 January 1991 conform to the entrapment protection requirements of the 1988 version of ANSI/UL standard 325.

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Consumer Product Safety CommissionConsumer Products Safety CommissionUS Consumer Product Safety Commission