Gaudentius (son of Aëtius)

Gaudentius
Gaudentius (c. 440 in Rome – after 455) was the son of Flavius Aetius.wikipedia
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Flavius Aetius

AetiusAëtiusEzio
Gaudentius (c. 440 in Rome – after 455) was the son of Flavius Aetius.
Later he married Pelagia, widow of Bonifacius, from whom he had a son, Gaudentius.

Placidia

Galla PlacidiaGalla Placidia Valentiniana Minor
In 454 his father and emperor Valentinian III arranged a marriage alliance, which included the marriage between Gaudentius and Placidia, but that year his father was killed by Valentinian himself.
Aetius also attempted to consolidate his position "by compelling the Emperor to swear to friendship with him and to agree to betroth Placidia to his own younger son Gaudentius."

Rome

RomanRomaRome, Italy
Gaudentius (c. 440 in Rome – after 455) was the son of Flavius Aetius. In 455, the Vandals sacked Rome; Gaudentius was one of the countless thousands made a prisoner and brought back to Africa.

Goths

GothicgothDeewan Lal Chand
F. M. Clover has persuasively argued that his mother was Pelagia, a Gothic noblewoman and the widow of Bonifacius.

Bonifacius

Count BonifaceBonifatiusBoniface
F. M. Clover has persuasively argued that his mother was Pelagia, a Gothic noblewoman and the widow of Bonifacius.

Merobaudes (poet)

Flavius MerobaudesMerobaudes
Scholars identify him as the unnamed subject of a poem of Flavius Merobaudes.

Valentinian III

ValentinianEmperor Valentinian IIIPlacidus Valentinianus Caesar
In 454 his father and emperor Valentinian III arranged a marriage alliance, which included the marriage between Gaudentius and Placidia, but that year his father was killed by Valentinian himself.

Vandals

VandalVandalicVandal Kingdom
In 455, the Vandals sacked Rome; Gaudentius was one of the countless thousands made a prisoner and brought back to Africa.

Gaiseric

GeisericGeiserikGenseric
Gaiseric claimed that his following attacks to Italy were to recover Gaudentius's legacy.

Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire

PLREThe Prosopography of the Later Roman EmpireProsopography of the Later Roman Empire - Volume III: A.D. 527 – 641
* Arnold Hugh Martin Jones, John Robert Martindale, John Morris, "Gaudentius 7", The Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire, volume 2, Cambridge University Press, 1980, ISBN: 0-521-20159-4, p. 494.

Majorian

Flavius Julius Valerius MajorianusJulius Majorianus AugustusMajorien
The Roman general, in fact, planned to marry his own son Gaudentius to Placidia.

Attila (miniseries)

Attila
Attila's first wife, N'kara, is entirely fictional as is the daughter of Aetius/Theodoric - although the fact that Attila had adult sons by his death does suggest that he had been married before - perhaps many times. Aetius, however, did have a son named Gaudentius.

440

Gaudentius, son of Flavius Aetius (approximate date)