Gautama Buddha

BuddhaSakyamuniShakyamunithe BuddhaSiddhartha GautamaShakyamuni BuddhaShaka NyoraiGautam BuddhaGautamaShaka
Not to be confused with the Chinese monk Budai ("the laughing Buddha") or Budha in Hindu astrology.wikipedia
3,744 Related Articles

Buddhism

BuddhistBuddhistsBuddhadharma
Siddhārtha Gautama (Sanskrit/Devanagari: सिद्धार्थ गौतम Siddhārtha Gautama, c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE) or Siddhattha Gotama in Pali, also called the Gautama Buddha, the Shakyamuni Buddha ("Buddha, Sage of the Shakyas") or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was a monk (śramaṇa), mendicant, sage, philosopher, teacher and religious leader on whose teachings Buddhism was founded.
Buddhism encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies.

Middle Way

Middle Pathmiddle-viewmoderation
Gautama taught a Middle Way between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement common in his region.
The Middle Way or Middle Path (undefined; undefined; ; ; มัชฌิมาปฏิปทา) is the term that Gautama Buddha used to describe the character of the Noble Eightfold Path he discovered that leads to liberation.

Buddha (title)

BuddhaBuddhasBouddha
Siddhārtha Gautama (Sanskrit/Devanagari: सिद्धार्थ गौतम Siddhārtha Gautama, c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE) or Siddhattha Gotama in Pali, also called the Gautama Buddha, the Shakyamuni Buddha ("Buddha, Sage of the Shakyas") or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was a monk (śramaṇa), mendicant, sage, philosopher, teacher and religious leader on whose teachings Buddhism was founded.
The title is most commonly used for Gautama Buddha, the founder of Buddhism, who is often simply known as "the Buddha".

Mahavira

MahavirMahāvīraMahaveer
558, or c. 400 BCE), the ruler of the Magadha empire, and died during the early years of the reign of Ajatasatru, who was the successor of Bimbisara, thus making him a younger contemporary of Mahavira, the Jain tirthankara. It was also the age of influential thinkers like Mahavira, Pūraṇa Kassapa, Makkhali Gosāla, Ajita Kesakambalī, Pakudha Kaccāyana, and Sañjaya Belaṭṭhaputta, as recorded in Samaññaphala Sutta, whose viewpoints the Buddha most certainly must have been acquainted with.
Historically, Mahavira was a contemporary of Gautama Buddha who preached Jainism in ancient India.

History of India

ancient IndiaIndiaIndian history
He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the northeastern part of ancient India sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.
549–477 BCE), proponent of Jainism, and Gautama Buddha (c.

Buddhahood

BuddhaBuddhasSamyaksambuddha
He is believed by Buddhists to be an enlightened teacher who attained full Buddhahood and shared his insights to help sentient beings end rebirth and suffering.
There is a broad spectrum of opinion on the universality and method of attainment of Buddhahood, depending on Gautama Buddha's teachings that a school of Buddhism emphasizes.

Mahajanapadas

Kingdoms of Ancient IndiaMahajanapadaancient India
Most people accept that the Buddha lived, taught, and founded a monastic order during the Mahajanapada era during the reign of Bimbisara (c.
This process of first settlement on land had completed its final stage prior to the times of the Buddha and Pāṇini.

Sarnath

IsipatanaDeer ParkIsipathana
According to Buddhist tradition, he obtained his enlightenment in Bodh Gaya, gave his first sermon in Sarnath, and died in Kushinagar.
The deer park in Sarnath is where Gautama Buddha first taught the Dharma, and where the Buddhist Sangha came into existence through the enlightenment of Kondanna (Kauṇḍinya).

Monasticism

monasticmonastic orderRule
Accounts of his life, discourses and monastic rules are believed by Buddhists to have been summarised after his death and memorized by his followers.
) and original bhikkhunis (nuns) was founded by Gautama Buddha during his lifetime over 2500 years ago.

Ajatashatru

AjatasattuAjatshatruAjātaśatru
558, or c. 400 BCE), the ruler of the Magadha empire, and died during the early years of the reign of Ajatasatru, who was the successor of Bimbisara, thus making him a younger contemporary of Mahavira, the Jain tirthankara.
He was the son of King Bimbisara and was a contemporary of both Mahavira and Gautama Buddha.

Sanskrit

Sanskrit languageClassical SanskritSkt.
Siddhārtha Gautama (Sanskrit/Devanagari: सिद्धार्थ गौतम Siddhārtha Gautama, c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE) or Siddhattha Gotama in Pali, also called the Gautama Buddha, the Shakyamuni Buddha ("Buddha, Sage of the Shakyas") or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was a monk (śramaṇa), mendicant, sage, philosopher, teacher and religious leader on whose teachings Buddhism was founded.
The language in the early Upanishads of Hinduism and the late Vedic literature approaches Classical Sanskrit, while the archaic Vedic Sanskrit had by the Buddha's time become unintelligible to all except ancient Indian sages, states Gombrich.

Bodh Gaya

BodhgayaBuddha GayaBuddhagaya
According to Buddhist tradition, he obtained his enlightenment in Bodh Gaya, gave his first sermon in Sarnath, and died in Kushinagar.
It is famous as it is the place where Gautama Buddha is said to have attained Enlightenment (Pali: bodhi) under what became known as the Bodhi Tree.

Maudgalyayana

MoggallanaMoggallānaMaudgalyāyana
Indeed, Sariputta and Moggallāna, two of the foremost disciples of the Buddha, were formerly the foremost disciples of Sañjaya Belaṭṭhaputta, the sceptic; and the Pali canon frequently depicts Buddha engaging in debate with the adherents of rival schools of thought.
Maudgalyāyana (Moggallāna), also known as Mahāmaudgalyāyana, was one of the Buddha's closest disciples.

Kushinagar

KusinaraKusinagaraKushinara
According to Buddhist tradition, he obtained his enlightenment in Bodh Gaya, gave his first sermon in Sarnath, and died in Kushinagar.
It is an important Buddhist pilgrimage site, where Buddhists believe Gautama Buddha attained Parinirvana after his death.

Piprahwa

Piprahwa StupaPiprahwā-Ganwārīā
According to the Buddhist tradition, Gautama was born in Lumbini, now in modern-day Nepal, and raised in the Shakya capital of Kapilvastu, which may have been either in what is present day Tilaurakot, Nepal or Piprahwa, India.
It lies in the heart of the historical Buddha's homeland and is 12 miles from the world heritage site of Lumbini that is believed to be the place of Gautama Buddha's birth.

Bimbisara

BimbisāraKing BimbisaraShrenika
Most people accept that the Buddha lived, taught, and founded a monastic order during the Mahajanapada era during the reign of Bimbisara (c.
He is also known for his cultural achievements and was a great friend and protector of the Buddha.

Shakya

Sakya clanŚākyaShakyas
Siddhārtha Gautama (Sanskrit/Devanagari: सिद्धार्थ गौतम Siddhārtha Gautama, c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE) or Siddhattha Gotama in Pali, also called the Gautama Buddha, the Shakyamuni Buddha ("Buddha, Sage of the Shakyas") or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was a monk (śramaṇa), mendicant, sage, philosopher, teacher and religious leader on whose teachings Buddhism was founded. But from the middle of the 3rd century BCE, several Edicts of Ashoka (reigned c. 269–232 BCE) mention the Buddha, and particularly Ashoka's Rummindei Minor Pillar Edict commemorates the Emperor's pilgrimage to Lumbini as the Buddha's birthplace, calling him the Buddha Shakyamuni (Brahmi script: 𑀩𑀼𑀥 𑀲𑀓𑁆𑀬𑀫𑀼𑀦𑀻 Bu-dha Sa-kya-mu-nī, "Buddha, Sage of the Shakyas").
6th to 4th centuries BCE), who came to be known as Gautama Buddha.

Kosala

Kingdom of KosalaKosala KingdomKaushal
He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India such as Magadha and Kosala.
During the 5th century BCE, Kosal incorporated the territory of the Shakya clan, to which the Buddha belonged.

Muni (Saint)

MuniMunissage
Siddhārtha Gautama (Sanskrit/Devanagari: सिद्धार्थ गौतम Siddhārtha Gautama, c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE) or Siddhattha Gotama in Pali, also called the Gautama Buddha, the Shakyamuni Buddha ("Buddha, Sage of the Shakyas") or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was a monk (śramaṇa), mendicant, sage, philosopher, teacher and religious leader on whose teachings Buddhism was founded.
In Buddhism the term "Muni" is used as a title of Gautama Buddha — who, being born among the tribe of the Shakyas, is called Śākyamuni (sage of the Shakyas).

Sariputta

SariputraSāriputtaŚāriputra
Indeed, Sariputta and Moggallāna, two of the foremost disciples of the Buddha, were formerly the foremost disciples of Sañjaya Belaṭṭhaputta, the sceptic; and the Pali canon frequently depicts Buddha engaging in debate with the adherents of rival schools of thought.
"the son of Sāri"); born Upatissa (Sanskrit: Upatisya); was one of the top disciples of Gautama Buddha.

Charvaka

CārvākaCarvakaLokayata
Apart from the Vedic Brahmins, the Buddha's lifetime coincided with the flourishing of influential Śramaṇa schools of thought like Ājīvika, Cārvāka, Jainism, and Ajñana.
Its teachings have been compiled from historic secondary literature such as those found in the shastras, sutras, and the Indian epic poetry as well as in the dialogues of Gautama Buddha and from Jain literature.

Brahmajala Sutta (Theravada)

Brahmajala SuttaBrahmajala SutraBrahmajāla Sutta
Brahmajala Sutta records sixty-two such schools of thought.
Many of these beliefs are still relevant in the modern world and thus the sutta provides Buddhist scholars with much information to ponder about the Buddha's teachings.

Pakudha Kaccayana

Pakudha KaccāyanaKaccāyana
It was also the age of influential thinkers like Mahavira, Pūraṇa Kassapa, Makkhali Gosāla, Ajita Kesakambalī, Pakudha Kaccāyana, and Sañjaya Belaṭṭhaputta, as recorded in Samaññaphala Sutta, whose viewpoints the Buddha most certainly must have been acquainted with.
was an Indian teacher who lived around the 6th century BCE, contemporaneous with Mahavira and the Buddha.

Edicts of Ashoka

edictsAshokan edictsedicts of Aśoka
But from the middle of the 3rd century BCE, several Edicts of Ashoka (reigned c. 269–232 BCE) mention the Buddha, and particularly Ashoka's Rummindei Minor Pillar Edict commemorates the Emperor's pilgrimage to Lumbini as the Buddha's birthplace, calling him the Buddha Shakyamuni (Brahmi script: 𑀩𑀼𑀥 𑀲𑀓𑁆𑀬𑀫𑀼𑀦𑀻 Bu-dha Sa-kya-mu-nī, "Buddha, Sage of the Shakyas").
Although Buddhism as well as Gautama Buddha are mentioned, the edicts focus on social and moral precepts rather than specific religious practices or the philosophical dimension of Buddhism.

Makkhali Gosala

GosalaMakkhali Gosāla
It was also the age of influential thinkers like Mahavira, Pūraṇa Kassapa, Makkhali Gosāla, Ajita Kesakambalī, Pakudha Kaccāyana, and Sañjaya Belaṭṭhaputta, as recorded in Samaññaphala Sutta, whose viewpoints the Buddha most certainly must have been acquainted with.
He was a contemporary of Siddhartha Gautama, the founder of Buddhism, and of Mahavira, the last and 24th Tirthankara of Jainism.