Gay Talese

Talese, Gay
Gay Talese (born February 7, 1932) is an American writer.wikipedia
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Esquire (magazine)

EsquireEsquire MagazineEsquire'' magazine
As a journalist for The New York Times and Esquire magazine during the 1960s, Talese helped to define literary journalism.
Under Harold Hayes, who ran it from 1961 to 1973, Esquire became as distinctive as its oversized pages, helping pioneer the trend of New Journalism by publishing such writers as Norman Mailer, Tim O'Brien, John Sack, Gay Talese, Tom Wolfe, and Terry Southern.

Joe DiMaggio

JoeDiMaggioJoe Di Maggio
Talese's most famous articles are about Joe DiMaggio and Frank Sinatra.

Frank Sinatra Has a Cold

His 1966 Esquire article on Frank Sinatra, "Frank Sinatra Has a Cold", is one of the most influential American magazine articles of all time, and a pioneering example of New Journalism and creative nonfiction.
"Frank Sinatra Has a Cold" is a profile of Frank Sinatra written by Gay Talese for the April 1966 issue of Esquire.

New Journalism

New Journalistsparticipatory journalismThe New Journalism
His 1966 Esquire article on Frank Sinatra, "Frank Sinatra Has a Cold", is one of the most influential American magazine articles of all time, and a pioneering example of New Journalism and creative nonfiction.
The term was codified with its current meaning by Tom Wolfe in a 1973 collection of journalism articles he published as The New Journalism, which included works by himself, Truman Capote, Hunter S. Thompson, Norman Mailer, Joan Didion, Terry Southern, Robert Christgau, Gay Talese and others.

Fame and Obscurity

When a number of Esquire essays were collected into a book called Fame and Obscurity, Talese paid tribute in its introduction to two writers he admired by citing "an aspiration on my part to somehow bring to reportage the tone that Irwin Shaw and John O'Hara had brought to the short story."
Fame and Obscurity: A Book About New York, a Bridge, and Celebrities on the Edge was a 1970 book by Gay Talese.

Copy boy

copyboycopy girlcopygirl
After graduating during June 1953, Talese relocated to New York City, yet could only find work as a copyboy.

Ocean City, New Jersey

Ocean CityOcean City, NJOcean City Boardwalk
Born in Ocean City, New Jersey, the son of Italian immigrant parents, Talese graduated from Ocean City High School in 1949, and went on to a degree from the University of Alabama.

Ocean City High School

Ocean City Red Raiders
Born in Ocean City, New Jersey, the son of Italian immigrant parents, Talese graduated from Ocean City High School in 1949, and went on to a degree from the University of Alabama.

Harold Hayes

Harold T. P. HayesHarold T.P. Hayes
In 1965, he left The New York Times to write full-time for editor Harold Hayes at Esquire.
As an editor, Hayes appreciated bold writing and points of view, favoring writers with a flair for ferreting out the spirit of the time—writers like Gay Talese, Tom Wolfe, Norman Mailer, Michael Herr, John Sack, Gore Vidal, William F. Buckley, Garry Wills, Gina Berriault, and Nora Ephron.

Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge

Verrazano-Narrows BridgeVerrazano Narrows BridgeVerrazano Bridge
In 1964, Talese published The Bridge: The Building of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, a reporter-style, non-fiction depiction of the construction of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge in New York City.
The construction of the bridge was chronicled by the writer Gay Talese in his 1964 book The Bridge: The Building of the -Narrows Bridge.

Gerald Foos

In June 2016, the credibility of Talese's book The Voyeur's Motel, whose subject was Gerald Foos, was questioned when it came to light Foos had made false statements to Talese which Talese did not verify.
He was the subject of Gay Talese's 2016 article "The Voyeur's Motel" in The New Yorker, in which Talese disclosed that Foos as a long time voyeur of people staying in his hotel, having installed grilles in the ceiling of most of the rooms that enabled him to view his guests without their knowledge.

The Kingdom and the Power

The Kingdom and the Power: Behind the Scenes at The New York Times: The Institution That Influences the World is a 1969 book by Gay Talese about the inner workings of The New York Times, the newspaper where Talese had worked for 12 years.

Honor Thy Father

here
Honor Thy Father is a 1971 book by Gay Talese, about the travails of the Bonanno crime family in the 1960s, especially Salvatore Bonanno and his father Joseph "Joe Bananas" Bonanno.

Thy Neighbor's Wife (book)

Thy Neighbor's WifeThy Neighbor's Wife'' (book)
Talese appeared as a character in several strips of the comic Doonesbury, giving an interview to radio host Mark Slackmeyer to promote his book Thy Neighbor's Wife.
Thy Neighbor's Wife is a non-fiction book by Gay Talese, published in 1981 and updated in 2009.

Norman Mailer Prize

Norman Mailer Prize for Lifetime Achievement
In 2011, Talese won the Norman Mailer Prize for Distinguished Journalism.

Creative nonfiction

Creative Non-Fictionliterary journalismnarrative nonfiction
As a journalist for The New York Times and Esquire magazine during the 1960s, Talese helped to define literary journalism. His 1966 Esquire article on Frank Sinatra, "Frank Sinatra Has a Cold", is one of the most influential American magazine articles of all time, and a pioneering example of New Journalism and creative nonfiction.
A handful of the most widely recognized writers in the genre such as Robert Caro, Gay Talese, Joseph Mitchell, Tom Wolfe, John McPhee, Joan Didion, John Perkins, Ryszard Kapuściński, Helen Garner and Norman Mailer have seen some criticism on their more prominent works.

Unto the Sons

Unto the Sons is a 1992 book by Gay Talese.

A Writer's Life

A Writer's Life is a 2006 autobiography by Gay Talese.

Nan A. Talese

Nan TaleseTalese, Nan A.
In 1959, Talese married writer Nan Talese, a New York editor who manages the Nan A. Talese/Doubleday imprint.
Talese married Gay Talese in 1959 and at that time was already working for Random House.

Frank Sinatra

SinatraFrankFrankie
Talese's most famous articles are about Joe DiMaggio and Frank Sinatra. His 1966 Esquire article on Frank Sinatra, "Frank Sinatra Has a Cold", is one of the most influential American magazine articles of all time, and a pioneering example of New Journalism and creative nonfiction.

University of Alabama

AlabamaThe University of AlabamaUniversity of Alabama at Tuscaloosa
Born in Ocean City, New Jersey, the son of Italian immigrant parents, Talese graduated from Ocean City High School in 1949, and went on to a degree from the University of Alabama.

Unintended consequences

unintended consequencelaw of unintended consequencesside effect
Talese's entry into writing was entirely happenstance, and the unintended consequence of the then high school sophomore's attempt to gain more playing time for the baseball team.

Phi Sigma Kappa

Phi Sigma EpsilonSignet (Phi Sigma Kappa)
At the University, he became a brother of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity.

In medias res

in media resbegins in the middle of the actionimmediately before a final battle over Paradise Falls
It was here that Talese would begin to employ literary devices more well known for fiction, such as establishing the "scene" with minute details, and beginning articles in medias res (Latin for "into the midst of things").

Lillian Ross (journalist)

Lillian RossLillian E. Ross
This was before Lillian Ross did the same in Picture (1952) or Truman Capote used the technique in The Muses Are Heard (1956).