Gay liberation

gay liberation movementGay Powergay rightsgay rights movementlesbian and gay rights activistLGBT rightsqueer liberationgay civil rightsGay Liberationistgay rights movements
The gay liberation movement is a social and political movement of the late 1960s through the mid-1980s that urged lesbians and gay men to engage in radical direct action, and to counter societal shame with gay pride.wikipedia
334 Related Articles

Stonewall riots

StonewallStonewall RebellionStonewall riot
The Stonewall Inn in the gay village of Greenwich Village, Manhattan, would be the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, and become the cradle of the modern LGBT rights and gay liberation movement. The Christopher Street Liberation Day Committee was formed in New York City to commemorate the first anniversary of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, the beginning of the international tradition of a late-June event to celebrate gay pride.
They are widely considered to constitute the most important event leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBT rights in the United States.

Stonewall Inn

StonewallStonewall AmbassadorStonewall of Miami Beach
The Stonewall Inn in the gay village of Greenwich Village, Manhattan, would be the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, and become the cradle of the modern LGBT rights and gay liberation movement.
The Stonewall Inn, often shortened to Stonewall, is a gay bar and recreational tavern in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City, and the site of the Stonewall riots of 1969, which is widely considered to be the single most important event leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBT rights in the United States.

Coming out

came outopenlyopenly gay
In the feminist spirit of the personal being political, the most basic form of activism was an emphasis on coming out to family, friends and colleagues, and living life as an openly lesbian or gay person.
With the spread of consciousness raising (CR) in the late 1960s, coming out became a key strategy of the gay liberation movement to raise political consciousness to counter heterosexism and homophobia.

Counterculture

counterculturalcounter-culturecounter-cultural
Gay liberation is also known for its links to the counterculture of the time (e.g. groups like the Radical Faeries) and for the gay liberationists' intent to transform or abolish fundamental institutions of society such as gender and the nuclear family; in general, the politics were radical, anti-racist, and anti-capitalist in nature.
Gay liberation (considered a precursor of various modern LGBT social movements) was known for its links to the counterculture of the time (e.g. groups like the Radical Faeries), and for the gay liberationists' intent to transform or abolish fundamental institutions of society such as gender and the nuclear family; in general, the politics were radical, anti-racist, and anti-capitalist in nature.

Greenwich Village

Greenwich Village, New YorkGreenwich Village Historic DistrictGreenwich Village, Manhattan
The Stonewall Inn in the gay village of Greenwich Village, Manhattan, would be the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, and become the cradle of the modern LGBT rights and gay liberation movement.
The Village has been a center for movements that challenged the wider American culture, for example, its role in the gay liberation movement.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Although the Stonewall riots of 1969 in New York are popularly remembered as the spark that produced a new movement, the origins predate these iconic events. These actions cost GLF, a numerically small group, popular support in New York City, and some of its members left to form the Gay Activists' Alliance.
They are widely considered to constitute the single most important event leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBT rights.

Christopher Street

Christopher95 Christopher StreetChristopher Park
The Christopher Street Liberation Day Committee was formed in New York City to commemorate the first anniversary of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, the beginning of the international tradition of a late-June event to celebrate gay pride.
Christopher Street is the site of the Stonewall Inn, the bar whose patrons fought back against a police raid, starting the 1969 Stonewall riots that are widely seen as the birth of the gay liberation movement.

Gay Liberation Front

Leicester Gay Liberation FrontGay LiberationGay Liberation Front (GLF)
The words "gay liberation" echoed "women's liberation"; the Gay Liberation Front consciously took its name from the National Liberation Fronts of Vietnam and Algeria; and the slogan "Gay Power", as a defiant answer to the rights-oriented homophile movement, was inspired by Black Power, which was a response to the civil rights movement.
The Gay Liberation Front (GLF) was the name of a number of gay liberation groups, the first of which was formed in New York City in 1969, immediately after the Stonewall riots, in which police clashed with gay demonstrators.

LGBT culture in New York City

ManhattanNew York CityLGBTQ culture in New York City
The Stonewall Inn in the gay village of Greenwich Village, Manhattan, would be the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, and become the cradle of the modern LGBT rights and gay liberation movement. The Christopher Street Liberation Day Committee was formed in New York City to commemorate the first anniversary of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, the beginning of the international tradition of a late-June event to celebrate gay pride.
Organized to coincide ahead of the NYC Pride March, both demonstrations commemorate the 1969 riots at the Stonewall Inn, widely considered the pivotal event sparking the gay liberation movement, and the modern fight for LGBT rights.

Homophile

Society for Individual Rightshomophilichomophile movement
The movements of the period immediately preceding gay liberation, from the end of World War II to the late 1960s, are known collectively as the homophile movement.
The use of the word began to disappear with the emergence of the gay liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s, replaced by a new set of terminology such as gay, lesbian, and bisexual.

Mattachine Society

MattachineMattachine MidwestMattachine New York
By 1965, influenced by Frank Kameny's addresses in the early 1960s, Dick Leitsch, the president of the New York Mattachine Society, advocated direct action, and the group staged the first public homosexual demonstrations and picket lines in the 1960s.
Although Hay claimed "never to have even heard" of the earlier gay liberation struggle in Germany—by the people around Adolf Brand, Magnus Hirschfeld and the Austrian-Hungarian Leontine Sagan—he is known to have talked about it with German émigrés in America, including the Austrian-born Rudi Gernreich.

Consciousness raising

consciousness-raisingraise awarenessraising awareness
In order to achieve such liberation, consciousness raising and direct action were employed.
In the 1960s, consciousness-raising caught on with gay liberation activists, who formed the first "coming-out groups" which helped participants come out of the closet among welcoming, tolerant individuals and share personal stories about coming out.

LGBT social movements

gay rights movementgay rightsLGBTQ rights movement
Sometimes the term gay liberation movement is even used synonymously or interchangeably with the gay rights movement.
The new social movements of the sixties, such as the Black Power and anti-Vietnam war movements in the US, the May 1968 insurrection in France, and Women's Liberation throughout the Western world, inspired many LGBT activists to become more radical, and the Gay Liberation movement emerged towards the end of the decade.

Gay Activists Alliance

Gay Activists' AllianceGay Activist AllianceGay Activists Alliance (GAA)
These actions cost GLF, a numerically small group, popular support in New York City, and some of its members left to form the Gay Activists' Alliance.

Lesbian

lesbianismlesbiansSapphic
The gay liberation movement is a social and political movement of the late 1960s through the mid-1980s that urged lesbians and gay men to engage in radical direct action, and to counter societal shame with gay pride.

Direct action

non-violent direct actiondirect actionsNonviolent direct action
In order to achieve such liberation, consciousness raising and direct action were employed. The gay liberation movement is a social and political movement of the late 1960s through the mid-1980s that urged lesbians and gay men to engage in radical direct action, and to counter societal shame with gay pride.

Gay pride

LGBT pridePridePride Month
The gay liberation movement is a social and political movement of the late 1960s through the mid-1980s that urged lesbians and gay men to engage in radical direct action, and to counter societal shame with gay pride.

Feminism

feministfeministsemancipation of women
In the feminist spirit of the personal being political, the most basic form of activism was an emphasis on coming out to family, friends and colleagues, and living life as an openly lesbian or gay person.

Gay

gayshomosexualgay men
In the feminist spirit of the personal being political, the most basic form of activism was an emphasis on coming out to family, friends and colleagues, and living life as an openly lesbian or gay person.

Gay village

gayborhoodgay neighborhoodgay ghetto
The Stonewall Inn in the gay village of Greenwich Village, Manhattan, would be the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, and become the cradle of the modern LGBT rights and gay liberation movement.

LGBT rights by country or territory

gay rightsLGBT rightsequality
The Stonewall Inn in the gay village of Greenwich Village, Manhattan, would be the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, and become the cradle of the modern LGBT rights and gay liberation movement.

North America

NorthNorth AmericanNA
The movement involved the lesbian and gay community in North America, South America, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand.

South America

South AmericanSouthSouth-America
The movement involved the lesbian and gay community in North America, South America, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand.

Western Europe

WesternWestern EuropeanWest European
The movement involved the lesbian and gay community in North America, South America, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand.

Australia

AUSAustralianCommonwealth of Australia
The movement involved the lesbian and gay community in North America, South America, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand.