Gedaliah

GedaliaGedaliah son of AhikamGedaliah the son of Ahikam, the son of Saphan
Gedaliah, Gedalia, Gedallah or Gedalya(h) ( or ; Gdalyyâh or Gdalyyâhû, meaning "Jah has become Great") was, according to the narratives in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Jeremiah and Second Book of Kings, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon as governor of Yehud province, which was formed after the defeat of the Kingdom of Judah and the destruction of Jerusalem, in a part of the territory that previously formed the kingdom.wikipedia
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Yehud (Babylonian province)

YehudYehud ProvinceBabylonian
Gedaliah, Gedalia, Gedallah or Gedalya(h) ( or ; Gdalyyâh or Gdalyyâhû, meaning "Jah has become Great") was, according to the narratives in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Jeremiah and Second Book of Kings, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon as governor of Yehud province, which was formed after the defeat of the Kingdom of Judah and the destruction of Jerusalem, in a part of the territory that previously formed the kingdom.
It first existed as a Jewish administrative division of the Neo-Babylonian Empire under Gedaliah, though it quickly became depopulated after his murder and another unsuccessful revolt around 581/2 BCE.

Book of Jeremiah

JeremiahConfessions of JeremiahJer.
Gedaliah, Gedalia, Gedallah or Gedalya(h) ( or ; Gdalyyâh or Gdalyyâhû, meaning "Jah has become Great") was, according to the narratives in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Jeremiah and Second Book of Kings, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon as governor of Yehud province, which was formed after the defeat of the Kingdom of Judah and the destruction of Jerusalem, in a part of the territory that previously formed the kingdom.
It is clear from the last chapters of the book, however, that he continued to speak in Egypt after the assassination of Gedaliah, the Babylonian-appointed governor of Judah, in 582.

Ahikam

Gedaliah was the son of Ahikam (who saved the life of the prophet Jeremiah) and the grandson of Shaphan (who is mentioned in relation to the discovery of the scroll of Teaching that some scholars identify as the core of the book of Deuteronomy, a matter of some controversy among scholars).
He was the son of Shaphan, the royal secretary, and the father of Gedaliah, governor of Judea after the destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonians.

Kingdom of Judah

Judahking of JudahHouse of Judah
Gedaliah, Gedalia, Gedallah or Gedalya(h) ( or ; Gdalyyâh or Gdalyyâhû, meaning "Jah has become Great") was, according to the narratives in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Jeremiah and Second Book of Kings, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon as governor of Yehud province, which was formed after the defeat of the Kingdom of Judah and the destruction of Jerusalem, in a part of the territory that previously formed the kingdom.
Gedaliah was appointed governor of the Yehud province, supported by a Babylonian guard.

Jeremiah

Prophet JeremiahJeremiasIeremias
Gedaliah was the son of Ahikam (who saved the life of the prophet Jeremiah) and the grandson of Shaphan (who is mentioned in relation to the discovery of the scroll of Teaching that some scholars identify as the core of the book of Deuteronomy, a matter of some controversy among scholars).
Jeremiah accordingly went to Mizpah in Benjamin with Gedaliah, who had been made governor of Judea.

Ishmael son of Nethaniah

NethaniahIshmaelIshmael, son of Nathaniel
Ishmael son of Nethaniah, and the ten men who were with him, murdered Gedaliah, together with most of the Jews who had joined him and many Babylonians whom Nebuchadnezzar had left with Gedaliah.
Ishmael (Hebrew: ישמעאל God shall hear) ben (= 'son of') Nethaniah was a member of the royal household of Judah who, according to biblical accounts in II Kings and Jeremiah, assassinated Gedaliah after he was appointed governor of Judah by king Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon.

Mizpah in Benjamin

MizpahMitzpaMitzpah
He was supported by a Chaldean guard stationed at Mizpah.
After the Babylonians had destroyed Jerusalem, they appointed Gedaliah governor in Mizpah over the remaining residents.

Fast of Gedalia

Fast of GedaliahTzom Gedaliahannual fast
To lament the assassination of Gedaliah, which left Judah devoid of any Jews and Jewish rule and completed the destruction of the First Temple, the Jewish Sages established the third day of Tishrei as the Fast of Gedaliah.
The Fast of Gedalia (, ; צוֹם גְּדַלְיָה Tzom Gedalya), also transliterated from the Hebrew language as Gedaliah or Gedalya(h), is a minor Jewish fast day from dawn until dusk to lament the assassination of Gedaliah, the righteous governor of Judah.

Shaphan

Bulla of Gemariah son of Shaphan
Gedaliah was the son of Ahikam (who saved the life of the prophet Jeremiah) and the grandson of Shaphan (who is mentioned in relation to the discovery of the scroll of Teaching that some scholars identify as the core of the book of Deuteronomy, a matter of some controversy among scholars).
Shaphan's grandson is Gedaliah, the short-lived governor of Judah appointed by Nebuchadnezzar after the destruction of Jerusalem in 586 BCE.

Tishrei

TishriEthanimTašrīn I
To lament the assassination of Gedaliah, which left Judah devoid of any Jews and Jewish rule and completed the destruction of the First Temple, the Jewish Sages established the third day of Tishrei as the Fast of Gedaliah.

Jah

YahJah Jah-iah
Gedaliah, Gedalia, Gedallah or Gedalya(h) ( or ; Gdalyyâh or Gdalyyâhû, meaning "Jah has become Great") was, according to the narratives in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Jeremiah and Second Book of Kings, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon as governor of Yehud province, which was formed after the defeat of the Kingdom of Judah and the destruction of Jerusalem, in a part of the territory that previously formed the kingdom.

Hebrew Bible

TanakhbiblicalHebrew Scriptures
Gedaliah, Gedalia, Gedallah or Gedalya(h) ( or ; Gdalyyâh or Gdalyyâhû, meaning "Jah has become Great") was, according to the narratives in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Jeremiah and Second Book of Kings, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon as governor of Yehud province, which was formed after the defeat of the Kingdom of Judah and the destruction of Jerusalem, in a part of the territory that previously formed the kingdom.

Books of Kings

2 Kings1 KingsKings
Gedaliah, Gedalia, Gedallah or Gedalya(h) ( or ; Gdalyyâh or Gdalyyâhû, meaning "Jah has become Great") was, according to the narratives in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Jeremiah and Second Book of Kings, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon as governor of Yehud province, which was formed after the defeat of the Kingdom of Judah and the destruction of Jerusalem, in a part of the territory that previously formed the kingdom.

Nebuchadnezzar II

NebuchadnezzarNebuchadrezzar IIKing Nebuchadnezzar
Gedaliah, Gedalia, Gedallah or Gedalya(h) ( or ; Gdalyyâh or Gdalyyâhû, meaning "Jah has become Great") was, according to the narratives in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Jeremiah and Second Book of Kings, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon as governor of Yehud province, which was formed after the defeat of the Kingdom of Judah and the destruction of Jerusalem, in a part of the territory that previously formed the kingdom.

Babylon

BabilBabelAncient Babylon
Gedaliah, Gedalia, Gedallah or Gedalya(h) ( or ; Gdalyyâh or Gdalyyâhû, meaning "Jah has become Great") was, according to the narratives in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Jeremiah and Second Book of Kings, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon as governor of Yehud province, which was formed after the defeat of the Kingdom of Judah and the destruction of Jerusalem, in a part of the territory that previously formed the kingdom.

Jerusalem

Jerusalem, IsraelAl-QudsQuds
Gedaliah, Gedalia, Gedallah or Gedalya(h) ( or ; Gdalyyâh or Gdalyyâhû, meaning "Jah has become Great") was, according to the narratives in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Jeremiah and Second Book of Kings, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon as governor of Yehud province, which was formed after the defeat of the Kingdom of Judah and the destruction of Jerusalem, in a part of the territory that previously formed the kingdom.

Chaldea

ChaldaeaChaldeansChaldees
He was supported by a Chaldean guard stationed at Mizpah.

Book of Deuteronomy

DeuteronomyDeut.Devarim
Gedaliah was the son of Ahikam (who saved the life of the prophet Jeremiah) and the grandson of Shaphan (who is mentioned in relation to the discovery of the scroll of Teaching that some scholars identify as the core of the book of Deuteronomy, a matter of some controversy among scholars).

Solomon's Temple

First TempleTemple of SolomonTemple
Although the dates are not clear from the Bible, this probably happened about 582/1 BCE, some four to five years and three months after the destruction of Jerusalem and the First Temple in 586 BCE.

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh HashanaJewish New YearRosh Hashannah
Although Gedaliah's assassination apparently occurred on the first day of Tishrei, the fast is observed on the third day so as not to coincide with Rosh Hashanah.

Hyman G. Rickover

Hyman RickoverHyman George RickoverAdmiral Hyman G. Rickover
He did not use his middle name Godalia (a form of Gedaliah), but he substituted "George" when required to list one for the Naval Academy oath.

Biblical Egypt

EgyptEgyptian
In the Bible, a number of Jews took refuge in Egypt after the destruction of the Kingdom of Judah in 597 BC, and the subsequent assassination of the Jewish governor, Gedaliah (2 Kings, Book of Jeremiah ).