Gelatin

gelatinegelatinousjellyhydrolyzed collagenjelly-likeanimal gelatinanimal jellycollagen peptidegeillgelatin (jelly)
Gelatin or gelatine (from gelatus meaning "stiff" or "frozen") is a translucent, colorless, brittle (when dry), flavorless food ingredient that is derived from collagen obtained from various animal body parts.wikipedia
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Collagen

procollagencollagenscollagen fibers
Gelatin or gelatine (from gelatus meaning "stiff" or "frozen") is a translucent, colorless, brittle (when dry), flavorless food ingredient that is derived from collagen obtained from various animal body parts.
Gelatin, which is used in food and industry, is collagen that has been, irreversibly, hydrolyzed.

Photographic film

filmfilm camerafilms
It is commonly used as a gelling agent in food, medications, drug and vitamin capsules, photographic films and papers, and cosmetics. It is used to hold silver halide crystals in an emulsion in virtually all photographic films and photographic papers. Despite significant effort, no suitable substitutes with the stability and low cost of gelatin have been found.
Photographic film is a strip or sheet of transparent plastic film base coated on one side with a gelatin emulsion containing microscopically small light-sensitive silver halide crystals.

Gummy candy

gummiesgummygummi candy
It is found in most gummy candy, as well as other products such as marshmallows, gelatin desserts, and some ice creams, dips, and yogurts.
Gummies, gummy candies, or jelly candies are a broad category of gelatin-based chewable sweets.

Gelatin dessert

jellyjelliesgelatin
It is found in most gummy candy, as well as other products such as marshmallows, gelatin desserts, and some ice creams, dips, and yogurts. Common examples of foods that contain gelatin are gelatin desserts, trifles, aspic, marshmallows, candy corn, and confections such as Peeps, gummy bears, fruit snacks, and jelly babies.
Jelly is a dessert made with a sweetened and flavored processed collagen product (gelatin).

Marshmallow

marshmallowsfluffy confectionguimauve
It is found in most gummy candy, as well as other products such as marshmallows, gelatin desserts, and some ice creams, dips, and yogurts. Common examples of foods that contain gelatin are gelatin desserts, trifles, aspic, marshmallows, candy corn, and confections such as Peeps, gummy bears, fruit snacks, and jelly babies.
A marshmallow is a sugar-based confectionery that in its modern form typically consists of sugar, water and gelatin whipped to a squishy consistency, molded into small cylindrical pieces, and coated with corn starch.

Capsule (pharmacy)

capsulescapsuleencapsulation
It is commonly used as a gelling agent in food, medications, drug and vitamin capsules, photographic films and papers, and cosmetics.
Both of these classes of capsules are made from aqueous solutions of gelling agents, such as animal protein (mainly gelatin) or plant polysaccharides or their derivatives (such as carrageenans and modified forms of starch and cellulose).

Thickening agent

thickenergelling agentthickening
It is commonly used as a gelling agent in food, medications, drug and vitamin capsules, photographic films and papers, and cosmetics.
Proteins used as food thickeners include collagen, egg whites, and gelatin.

Glycine

GlyGglycinate
Hydrolyzed collagen contains 19 amino acids, predominantly glycine, proline and hydroxyproline, which together represent around 50% of the total amino acid content.
Glycine was discovered in 1820 by the French chemist Henri Braconnot when he hydrolyzed gelatin by boiling it with sulfuric acid.

Hydroxyproline

(2''S'', 4''R'')-4-hydroxyproline4-hydroxy-L-proline4-hydroxyproline
Hydrolyzed collagen contains 19 amino acids, predominantly glycine, proline and hydroxyproline, which together represent around 50% of the total amino acid content.
In 1902, Hermann Emil Fischer isolated hydroxyproline from hydrolyzed gelatin.

Photographic paper

paperpapersbromide paper
It is commonly used as a gelling agent in food, medications, drug and vitamin capsules, photographic films and papers, and cosmetics. It is used to hold silver halide crystals in an emulsion in virtually all photographic films and photographic papers. Despite significant effort, no suitable substitutes with the stability and low cost of gelatin have been found.
All photographic papers consist of a light-sensitive emulsion, consisting of silver halide salts suspended in a colloidal material - usually gelatin- coated onto a paper, resin coated paper or polyester support.

Gel

hydrogelhydrogelsgels
Gelatin readily dissolves in hot water and sets to a gel on cooling.
A gel is a solid jelly-like material that can have properties ranging from soft and weak to hard and tough.

Yogurt

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It is found in most gummy candy, as well as other products such as marshmallows, gelatin desserts, and some ice creams, dips, and yogurts.
Some yogurts contain added modified starch, pectin (found naturally in fruit), and/or gelatin to create thickness and creaminess artificially at lower cost.

Jell-O

jelloalcohol-infused gelatin dessertJell-O Shot
Food applications in France and the United States during 1800–1900 appear to have established the versatility of gelatin, including the origin of its popularity in the US as Jell-O.
The powder contains powdered gelatin and flavorings, including sugar or artificial sweeteners.

Aspic

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This process is used for aspic. Common examples of foods that contain gelatin are gelatin desserts, trifles, aspic, marshmallows, candy corn, and confections such as Peeps, gummy bears, fruit snacks, and jelly babies.
Aspic is a dish in which ingredients are set into a gelatin made from a meat stock or consommé.

Gummy bear

gummy bearsgummi beargummi bears
Common examples of foods that contain gelatin are gelatin desserts, trifles, aspic, marshmallows, candy corn, and confections such as Peeps, gummy bears, fruit snacks, and jelly babies.
The gummy bear is one of many gummies, popular gelatin-based candies sold in a variety of shapes and colors.

Bloom (test)

Bloomgram strengths
The viscosity of the gelatin-water mixture is greatest when the gelatin concentration is high and the mixture is kept cool at about 4 C. The gel strength is quantified using the Bloom test.
Bloom is a test to measure the strength of a gel or gelatin.

Jelly Babies

jelly babyDjelibeybi
Common examples of foods that contain gelatin are gelatin desserts, trifles, aspic, marshmallows, candy corn, and confections such as Peeps, gummy bears, fruit snacks, and jelly babies.
Like most other gummy sweets, they contain gelatin.

Trifle

English Triflesherry trifle
Common examples of foods that contain gelatin are gelatin desserts, trifles, aspic, marshmallows, candy corn, and confections such as Peeps, gummy bears, fruit snacks, and jelly babies.
The name trifle was used for a dessert like a fruit fool in the sixteenth century; by the eighteenth century, Hannah Glasse records a recognisably modern trifle, with the inclusion of a gelatin jelly.

Animal glue

hide gluefish glueglue factory
Some animal glues such as hide glue may be unrefined gelatin.
These protein colloid glues are formed through hydrolysis of the collagen from skins, bones, tendons, and other tissues, similar to gelatin.

Emulsion

emulsifieremulsifiersemulsification
It is used to hold silver halide crystals in an emulsion in virtually all photographic films and photographic papers. Despite significant effort, no suitable substitutes with the stability and low cost of gelatin have been found.
Such a photographic emulsion consists of silver halide colloidal particles dispersed in a gelatin matrix.

Shengjian mantou

It also is used in the production of several types of Chinese soup dumplings, specifically Shanghainese soup dumplings, or xiaolongbao, as well as Shengjian mantou, a type of fried and steamed dumpling.
It is usually filled with pork and gelatin that melts into soup/liquid when cooked.

Cross-link

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Acid treatment is especially suitable for less fully cross-linked materials such as pig skin collagen and normally requires 10 to 48 hours.
Other examples of materials which form physically cross-linked gels include gelatin, collagen, agarose, and agar agar.

Isinglass

fish finingsfish gelatinfish glue
Isinglass is obtained from the swim bladders of fish.
Before the inexpensive production of gelatin and other competing products, isinglass was used in confectionery and desserts such as fruit jelly and blancmange.

Color gel

gelcolor filtergels
Certain professional and theatrical lighting equipment use color gels to change the beam color. Historically, these were made with gelatin, hence the term, color gel.
Later, a gelatin base became the material of choice.

Bone

bone tissuecancellous bonecortical bone
It seems that hydrolyzed collagen peptides stimulated differentiation and osteoblasts activity- the cells that build bone- over that of osteoclasts (cells that destroy bone).
Essentially the same process, with further refinement, thickening and drying, is used to make gelatin.