Gene Autry

The Gene Autry ShowGolden West BroadcastersGeneGene Autry RidesThe Singing CowboyGene Autry / Melody RanchGene Autry ComicsGene Autry Comics / Gene Autry and ChampionGene Autry MuseumGene Autry Productions
Orvon Grover "Gene" Autry (September 29, 1907 – October 2, 1998), nicknamed The Singing Cowboy, was an American singer, songwriter, actor, musician and rodeo performer who gained fame largely by singing in a crooning style on radio, in films, and on television for more than three decades beginning in the early 1930s.wikipedia
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Back in the Saddle Again

In addition to his signature song, "Back in the Saddle Again", and his hit "At Mail Call Today", Autry is still remembered for his Christmas holiday songs, most especially his biggest hit "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer" as well as "Frosty the Snowman", "Here Comes Santa Claus", and "Up on the House Top".
"Back in the Saddle Again" was the signature song of American cowboy entertainer Gene Autry.

Frosty the Snowman

FrostyFrosty The Snow ManLegend of Frosty the Snowman
In addition to his signature song, "Back in the Saddle Again", and his hit "At Mail Call Today", Autry is still remembered for his Christmas holiday songs, most especially his biggest hit "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer" as well as "Frosty the Snowman", "Here Comes Santa Claus", and "Up on the House Top".
"Frosty the Snowman" (or "Frosty the Snow Man") is a popular Christmas song written by Walter "Jack" Rollins and Steve Nelson, and first recorded by Gene Autry and the Cass County Boys in 1950 and later recorded by Jimmy Durante, releasing it as a single.

Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame

Nashville Songwriter2005songwriter
Autry is a member of both the Country Music Hall of Fame and Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, and is the only person to be awarded stars in all five categories on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, for film, television, music, radio, and live performance.

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (song)

Rudolph the Red-Nosed ReindeerRudolph the Red Nosed ReindeerRudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer
In addition to his signature song, "Back in the Saddle Again", and his hit "At Mail Call Today", Autry is still remembered for his Christmas holiday songs, most especially his biggest hit "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer" as well as "Frosty the Snowman", "Here Comes Santa Claus", and "Up on the House Top".
Gene Autry's recording hit No.

Here Comes Santa Claus

Here Comes Santa Claus (Right Down Santa Claus Lane)Here Comes Santa Claus (Down Santa Claus Lane)Santa Claus Lane
In addition to his signature song, "Back in the Saddle Again", and his hit "At Mail Call Today", Autry is still remembered for his Christmas holiday songs, most especially his biggest hit "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer" as well as "Frosty the Snowman", "Here Comes Santa Claus", and "Up on the House Top".
"Here Comes Santa Claus (Down Santa Claus Lane)" is a Christmas song originally written and performed by Gene Autry, with music composed by Oakley Haldeman.

Columbia Records

ColumbiaCBSCBS Records
Autry signed a recording deal with Columbia Records in 1929.
Artists who have recorded for Columbia include AC/DC, Adele, Aerosmith, Louis Armstrong, Gene Autry, Count Basie, Nora Bayes, Bix Beiderbecke, Tony Bennett, Leonard Bernstein, Beyoncé, Blue Öyster Cult, Dave Brubeck, The Byrds, Mariah Carey, Pablo Casals, Johnny Cash, The Clash, The Cleveland Orchestra, Rosemary Clooney, Leonard Cohen, Ornette Coleman, Elvis Costello, Miles Davis, Neil Diamond, Celine Dion, Bob Dylan, Earth, Wind & Fire, Duke Ellington, 50 Cent, Flatt and Scruggs, Erroll Garner, Benny Goodman, Glenn Gould, Adelaide Hall, Herbie Hancock, Lauryn Hill, Billie Holiday, Vladimir Horowitz, Billy Joel, Blind Willie Johnson, Robert Johnson, Al Jolson, Janis Joplin, Andre Kostelanetz, Yo-Yo Ma, Johnny Mathis, John Mayer, George Michael, Mitch Miller, Charles Mingus, Thelonious Monk, Billy Murray, Willie Nelson, The New York Philharmonic, The Philadelphia Orchestra, Pink Floyd, Santana, Frank Sinatra, Simon and Garfunkel, Bessie Smith, John Philip Sousa, Bruce Springsteen, Igor Stravinsky, Barbra Streisand, System of a Down, James Taylor, Bonnie Tyler, Ethel Waters, Weather Report, Paul Whiteman, Andy Williams, Bert Williams, Pharrell Williams, Bob Wills, and Bill Withers.

Smiley Burnette

Frog MillhouseSmiley Burnette Western
He worked in Chicago on the WLS-AM radio show National Barn Dance for four years, and with his own show, where he met singer-songwriter Smiley Burnette.
Lester Alvin Burnett (March 18, 1911 – February 16, 1967), better known as Smiley Burnette, was an American country music performer and a comedic actor in Western films and on radio and TV, playing sidekick to Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, and other B-movie cowboys.

The Gene Autry Show

Gene Autry Showhis show
From 1934 to 1953, Autry appeared in 93 films, and between 1950 and 1956 hosted The Gene Autry Show television series.
Series star Gene Autry had already established his singing cowboy character on radio and the movies.

Challenge Records (1950s-60s label)

Challenge RecordsChallengeJackpot Records
Autry was the original owner of Challenge Records.
Challenge Records was founded in Los Angeles in 1957 by cowboy singer Gene Autry and former Columbia Records A&R representative Joe Johnson.

Christmas music

ChristmasChristmas albumChristmas song
In addition to his signature song, "Back in the Saddle Again", and his hit "At Mail Call Today", Autry is still remembered for his Christmas holiday songs, most especially his biggest hit "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer" as well as "Frosty the Snowman", "Here Comes Santa Claus", and "Up on the House Top".
Many titles help define the mythical aspects of modern Christmas celebration: Santa Claus bringing presents, coming down the chimney, being pulled by reindeer, etc. New mythical characters are created, defined, and popularized by these songs; "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer", adapted from a major retailer's promotional poem, was introduced to radio audiences by Gene Autry in 1949.

That Silver-Haired Daddy of Mine

Silver Haired Daddy of MineThat Silver Haired Daddy of Mine
His first hit was in 1932 with "That Silver-Haired Daddy of Mine", a duet with fellow railroad man Jimmy Long that Autry and Long co-wrote.
"That Silver-Haired Daddy Of Mine" was the first hit song of American cowboy entertainer Gene Autry, a duet with fellow railroad man, Jimmy Long, which Autry and Long co-wrote.

National Barn Dance

Barn Danceradio show of the same nameWLS Barn Dance
He worked in Chicago on the WLS-AM radio show National Barn Dance for four years, and with his own show, where he met singer-songwriter Smiley Burnette.
The show regularly featured Gene Autry, Red Foley, The Three Little Maids, Jenny Lou Carson, Eddie Dean, Lulu Belle and Scotty, Pat Buttram, George Gobel, The Williams Brothers (featuring future crooner Andy Williams), Arkansas Woodchopper, The DeZurik Sisters and the Hoosier Hot Shots.

Republic Pictures

RepublicRepublic StudiosRepublic Pictures Home Video
Together, Autry and Burnette made their film debut for Mascot Pictures Corp. in In Old Santa Fe as part of a singing cowboy quartet; he was then given the starring role by Levine in 1935 in the 12-part serial The Phantom Empire. Shortly thereafter, Mascot was absorbed by the newly formed Republic Pictures Corp. and Autry went along to make a further 44 films up to 1940, all B Westerns in which he played under his own name, rode his horse, Champion, had Burnette as his regular sidekick, and had many opportunities to sing in each film.
Republic was also notable for developing the careers of John Wayne, Gene Autry and Roy Rogers.

The Champs

ChampsDave Burgess
The label's biggest hit was "Tequila" by The Champs in 1958, which started the rock-and-roll instrumental craze of the late 1950s and early 1960s.
The group took their name from the name of Gene Autry's horse, Champion, and was formed by studio executives at Autry's Challenge Records to record a B-side for the Dave Burgess single, "Train to Nowhere".

Pat Buttram

Pat Buttram was picked by Gene Autry, recently returned from his World War II service in the United States Army Air Forces, to work with him.
Maxwell Emmett Buttram (June 19, 1915 – January 8, 1994), professionally known as Pat Buttram, was an American character actor, known for playing the sidekick of Gene Autry and for playing the character of Mr. Haney in the television series Green Acres.

Hollywood Walk of Fame

Walk of FameHollywood's Walk of FameHollywood Chamber of Commerce
Autry is a member of both the Country Music Hall of Fame and Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, and is the only person to be awarded stars in all five categories on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, for film, television, music, radio, and live performance.
Gene Autry is the only honoree with stars in all five categories.

Gene Autry, Oklahoma

Gene AutryBerwynBerwyn, Oklahoma
The town of Gene Autry, Oklahoma, was named in his honor, as was the Gene Autry precinct in Mesa, Arizona.
Finally, on November 16, 1941, it was renamed "Gene Autry" to honor the singer and motion picture star.

The Phantom Empire

Men with Steel FacesPhantom Empire, The
Together, Autry and Burnette made their film debut for Mascot Pictures Corp. in In Old Santa Fe as part of a singing cowboy quartet; he was then given the starring role by Levine in 1935 in the 12-part serial The Phantom Empire. Shortly thereafter, Mascot was absorbed by the newly formed Republic Pictures Corp. and Autry went along to make a further 44 films up to 1940, all B Westerns in which he played under his own name, rode his horse, Champion, had Burnette as his regular sidekick, and had many opportunities to sing in each film.
The Phantom Empire is a 1935 American Western serial film directed by Otto Brower and B. Reeves Eason and starring Gene Autry, Frankie Darro, and Betsy King Ross.

In Old Santa Fe

Together, Autry and Burnette made their film debut for Mascot Pictures Corp. in In Old Santa Fe as part of a singing cowboy quartet; he was then given the starring role by Levine in 1935 in the 12-part serial The Phantom Empire. Shortly thereafter, Mascot was absorbed by the newly formed Republic Pictures Corp. and Autry went along to make a further 44 films up to 1940, all B Westerns in which he played under his own name, rode his horse, Champion, had Burnette as his regular sidekick, and had many opportunities to sing in each film.
In Old Santa Fe is a 1934 American Western film directed by David Howard, starring Ken Maynard, George "Gabby" Hayes and Evalyn Knapp and featuring the first screen appearance of Gene Autry, singing a rendition of "Wyoming Waltz" accompanied by his own acoustic guitar with Smiley Burnette on accordion.

Jimmie Rodgers (country singer)

Jimmie RodgersJimmie RogersJimmy Rodgers
Autry was also one of the most important pioneering figures in the history of country music, considered the second major influential artist of the genre's development after Jimmie Rodgers.
Both Gene Autry and future Louisiana governor Jimmie Davis (said to have been author of "You Are My Sunshine") began their careers as Jimmie Rodgers copyists, and Merle Haggard, Hank Snow, and Lefty Frizzell later did tribute albums.

Melody Ranch

film of the same name
He renamed it the Melody Ranch after his movie Melody Ranch. Autry then sold 98 acres of the property, most of the original ranch.
Melody Ranch is a 1940 Western musical film directed by Joseph Santley and starring Gene Autry, Jimmy Durante, and Ann Miller.

Roy Rogers

The Roy Rogers ShowLeonard SlyeRogers
In the Motion Picture Herald Top Ten Money-Making Western Stars poll, Autry was listed every year from the first poll in 1936 to 1942 and 1946 to 1954 (he was serving in the AAF 1943–45), holding first place 1937 to 1942, and second place (after Roy Rogers) 1947 to 1954, when the poll ceased.
From his first film appearance in 1935, Slye worked steadily in Western films, including a large supporting role as a singing cowboy while still billed as Leonard Slye in a Gene Autry movie.

Top Ten Money Making Stars Poll

Top Ten Money Making Starsthe annual ''Quigley'' PollTop Ten Money-Making Western Stars
In the Motion Picture Herald Top Ten Money-Making Western Stars poll, Autry was listed every year from the first poll in 1936 to 1942 and 1946 to 1954 (he was serving in the AAF 1943–45), holding first place 1937 to 1942, and second place (after Roy Rogers) 1947 to 1954, when the poll ceased.

Mascot Pictures

MascotMascot Pictures Corporation
Together, Autry and Burnette made their film debut for Mascot Pictures Corp. in In Old Santa Fe as part of a singing cowboy quartet; he was then given the starring role by Levine in 1935 in the 12-part serial The Phantom Empire. Shortly thereafter, Mascot was absorbed by the newly formed Republic Pictures Corp. and Autry went along to make a further 44 films up to 1940, all B Westerns in which he played under his own name, rode his horse, Champion, had Burnette as his regular sidekick, and had many opportunities to sing in each film.
In 1935 the studio produced The Phantom Empire with the then untried Gene Autry as the lead.

Columbia Pictures

ColumbiaColumbia Pictures CorporationColumbia Studios
After 1951, Autry formed his own production company to make Westerns under his own control, which continued the 1947 distribution agreement with Columbia Pictures.''
Over the next two decades Columbia released scores of outdoor adventures with Jones, Tim McCoy, Ken Maynard, Jack Luden, Bob Allen (Robert (Tex) Allen), Russell Hayden, Tex Ritter, Ken Curtis, and Gene Autry.