General Dynamics F-111C

F-111CF-111F-111CsGeneral Dynamics F-111F-111 bomberF-111C aircraftF-111C/GsRAAF F-111CRF-111RF-111C
The General Dynamics F-111C (nicknamed "Pig") is a variant of the F-111 Aardvark medium-range interdictor and tactical strike aircraft, developed by General Dynamics to meet Australian requirements.wikipedia
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Valston Hancock

Val HancockSir Valston HancockValston Eldridge Hancock
Air Marshal Valston Hancock, Chief of the Air Staff, stated in April 1960 that Australia needed a replacement for the Canberra.
He also evaluated potential replacements for the RAAF's English Electric Canberra bomber, selecting the American "TFX" (later the General Dynamics F-111) as the most suitable for Australia's needs, though he did not recommend its immediate purchase due to its early stage of development.

English Electric Canberra

CanberraCanberrasCanberra bomber
The Menzies government first publicly discussed the need for replacing the English Electric Canberra in 1954, only a year after the RAAF began receiving the bomber.
Australia evaluated the BAC TSR-2, Dassault Mirage IV, McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II and North American A-5 Vigilante, and initially appeared to favour the TSR-2, but chose to procure the General Dynamics F-111C in October 1963.

General Dynamics

General Dynamics CorporationGeneral Dynamics Corp.Saco Defense
The General Dynamics F-111C (nicknamed "Pig") is a variant of the F-111 Aardvark medium-range interdictor and tactical strike aircraft, developed by General Dynamics to meet Australian requirements.

Dassault Mirage IV

Mirage IVMirage IVPDassault Mirage IV P (nuclear Penetration)
Early candidates were the French Dassault Mirage IV, the TSR-2, and the U.S. North American A-5 Vigilante, McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II and the TFX.
Australian Air Marshall Frederick Scherger seriously considered purchase of the IVA in 1961 because it was considered to be proven hardware already in service (in contrast to the BAC TSR-2 which was still in development), before settling on the General Dynamics F-111C.

McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II in Australian service

interim measureinterim strike forceleased from the USAF
During its next three years in RAAF service, one F-4 was lost.
The Phantoms were leased from the United States Air Force (USAF) as an interim measure owing to delays in the delivery of the RAAF's 24 General Dynamics F-111C bombers.

Harpoon (missile)

HarpoonHarpoon missileRGM-84 Harpoon
F-111Cs were also equipped to launch the AGM-84 Harpoon anti-ship missile and the AGM-142 Popeye stand-off missile.
The Royal Australian Air Force can fire AGM-84-series missiles from its F/A-18F Super Hornets, F/A-18A/B Hornets, and AP-3C Orion aircraft, and previously from the now retired F-111C/Gs.

RAAF Washington Flying Unit

On 31 March, the RAAF Washington Flying Unit was formed at McClellan Air Force Base in California with the mission of ferrying the first 12 F-111Cs to Australia.
The RAAF Washington Flying Unit was a temporary Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) unit formed to ferry Australia's first twelve General Dynamics F-111C aircraft from the United States to Australia.

No. 3 Aircraft Depot RAAF

No. 3 Aircraft DepotNumber 3 Aircraft Depot3 Aircraft Depots
From 1973 to 2001 No. 482 Squadron conducted intermediate maintenance of the aircraft, while heavy maintenance was the responsibility of No. 3 Aircraft Depot.
In the 1970s it began maintaining and upgrading the General Dynamics F-111C swing-wing bomber, along with Bell UH-1 Iroquois and Boeing CH-47 Chinook helicopters.

No. 1 Squadron RAAF

No. 1 SquadronNo. 1 Squadron AFCNos. 1
F-111Cs were allocated to No. 1 Squadron and No. 6 Squadron, under the control of No.
It operated McDonald Douglas F-4E Phantom IIs leased from the USAF from 1970 to 1973, as a stop-gap pending delivery of the General Dynamics F-111C swing-wing bomber.

No. 82 Wing RAAF

No. 82 WingNo. 82 (Bomber) WingNo. 82 (Heavy Bomber) Wing
The Phantoms were delivered in September and October 1970 to No. 82 Wing at RAAF Base Amberley, Queensland.
Between 1970 and 1973, as a stop-gap pending delivery of the long-delayed General Dynamics F-111C swing-wing bomber, Nos.

McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II

F-4 Phantom IIF-4 PhantomF-4
Early candidates were the French Dassault Mirage IV, the TSR-2, and the U.S. North American A-5 Vigilante, McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II and the TFX.
The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) leased 24 USAF F-4Es from 1970 to 1973 while waiting for their order for the General Dynamics F-111C to be delivered.

No. 482 Squadron RAAF

No. 482 SquadronNo. 482 (Maintenance) SquadronNo. 4 Repair and Salvage Unit RAAF
From 1973 to 2001 No. 482 Squadron conducted intermediate maintenance of the aircraft, while heavy maintenance was the responsibility of No. 3 Aircraft Depot.
Over the years it serviced the wing's Consolidated B-24 Liberators, Avro Lincolns, English Electric Canberras, McDonnell Douglas F-4E Phantoms, and General Dynamics F-111Cs.

Boeing B-47 Stratojet

B-47 StratojetB-47Boeing B-47E Stratojet
The U.S. offered two squadrons of Boeing B-47 Stratojets for free lease pending the delivery of the F-111; Australia declined the offer in June 1964 —despite the aircraft having been demonstrated around the country just before the 1963 election as an interim Canberra replacement, likely another sign of the American preference for Menzies— because the B-47 did not offer significant improvements over the Canberra and, like the V bombers, would require longer runways.
In 1963, the Kennedy administration offered 24 B-47E bombers as an interim Canberra Mk 20 replacement for Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), pending delivery of the much delayed F-111C aircraft.

John Newham

Jake NewhamAIRMSHL John NewhamJ.W. Newham
This unit was commanded by Group Captain John Newham, who later served as Chief of the Air Staff between 1985 and 1988.
His commands in the early 1970s included the Aircraft Research and Development Unit, RAAF Base Laverton, and No. 82 Wing, the last-mentioned during its first years operating the long-delayed General Dynamics F-111C swing-wing bomber.

General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark

F-111General Dynamics F-111F-111 Aardvark
The General Dynamics F-111C (nicknamed "Pig") is a variant of the F-111 Aardvark medium-range interdictor and tactical strike aircraft, developed by General Dynamics to meet Australian requirements.
The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) also ordered the type and began operating F-111Cs in 1973.

Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet

F/A-18E/F Super HornetF/A-18E Super HornetF/A-18F Super Hornet
The F-111s were replaced by 24 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornets pending delivery of F-35 Lightning IIs in development.
The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), which has operated the F/A-18A as its main fighter since 1984, ordered the F/A-18F in 2007 to replace its aging F-111C fleet.

International Force East Timor

INTERFETInternational Force for East TimorEast Timor
The Australian-led INTERFET intervention into East Timor in September 1999 marked the closest Australia's F-111s ever came to combat.
The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) re-deployed frontline combat aircraft—F/A-18s and F-111s—northward to Tindal in the Northern Territory to act as a deterrent against escalation of the conflict by the Indonesian military and provide close air support and air defence in support of the landing if required.

Pratt & Whitney TF30

TF30TF-30Pratt & Whitney/SNECMA TF106
The aircraft were powered by two Pratt & Whitney TF30 afterburning turbofan engines.

General Dynamics F-111K

General Dynamics F-111an adapted versionF-111
The versatility of the F-111 and uncertainty over the TSR-2 led, in 1963, to contracts for the RAAF-specific General Dynamics F-111C.

No. 6 Squadron RAAF

No. 6 Squadron6No. 6 (Training) Squadron AFC
F-111Cs were allocated to No. 1 Squadron and No. 6 Squadron, under the control of No.
6 Squadrons were scheduled to be re-equipped with General Dynamics F-111C strike aircraft from 1968.

Franklin Dam controversy

Franklin DamFranklin River DamGordon-below-Franklin Dam
In 1983 the Hawke government tasked an RF-111 to take surveillance photos of the Franklin Dam project in Tasmania.
In April 1983 the Australian Government sent a Mirage jet and later an RF-111, from the Royal Australian Air Force, to undertake a reconnaissance mission over the dam to gather evidence that the Tasmanian Government was not complying with Federal legislation to stop work.

Pong Su incident

Pong SuMV ''Pong SuPong Su'' incident
In mid-2006, an RAAF F-111 was chosen to scuttle the North Korean ship Pong Su which had been involved in one of Australia's largest drug hauls in recorded history.
On 23 March 2006, in a joint Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and Royal Australian Navy military exercise, the Pong Su was sunk by two GBU-10 Paveway II laser-guided bombs dropped from RAAF General Dynamics F-111C aircraft.

Shellharbour Airport

Illawarra Regional AirportHistorical Aircraft Restoration SocietyDapto International Airport