General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark

F-111General Dynamics F-111F-111 AardvarkFB-111AF-111FF-111sGeneral Dynamics FB-111A AardvarkFB-111F-111EF-111F Aardvark
The General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark was an American supersonic, medium-range interdictor and tactical attack aircraft that also filled the roles of strategic nuclear bomber, aerial reconnaissance, and electronic-warfare aircraft in its various versions.wikipedia
666 Related Articles

General Dynamics F-111C

F-111F-111CF-111Cs
The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) also ordered the type and began operating F-111Cs in 1973.
The General Dynamics F-111C (nicknamed "Pig") is a variant of the F-111 Aardvark medium-range interdictor and tactical strike aircraft, developed by General Dynamics to meet Australian requirements.

McDonnell Douglas F-15E Strike Eagle

F-15E Strike EagleF-15EF-15I
The F-111 was replaced in USAF service by the F-15E Strike Eagle for medium-range precision strike missions, while the supersonic bomber role has been assumed by the B-1B Lancer.
The company envisaged the aircraft as a replacement for the General Dynamics F-111 and the remaining F-4s, as well as to augment the existing F-15s.

Turbofan

turbofan enginehigh-bypass turbofanturbofans
The F-111 pioneered several technologies for production aircraft, including variable-sweep wings, afterburning turbofan engines, and automated terrain-following radar for low-level, high-speed flight.
The first production afterburning turbofan engine was the Pratt & Whitney TF30, which initially powered the F-111 Aardvark and F-14 Tomcat.

Attack aircraft

ground-attack aircraftground attack aircraftattack
The General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark was an American supersonic, medium-range interdictor and tactical attack aircraft that also filled the roles of strategic nuclear bomber, aerial reconnaissance, and electronic-warfare aircraft in its various versions.
"F - Fighter Aircraft were designed to intercept and destroy other aircraft or missiles. This includes multipurpose aircraft also designed for ground support missions such as interdiction and close air support. Just to mention one example amongst many, the F-111 "Aardvark" was designated F despite having only minimal air-to-air capabilities. Only a single aircraft in the USAF's current inventory bears a simple, unmixed "A" designation: the A-10 Thunderbolt II.

Republic F-105 Thunderchief

F-105 ThunderchiefF-105F-105D
TAC was in the process of receiving its latest design, the Republic F-105 Thunderchief, which was designed to deliver nuclear weapons fast and far, but required long runways.
The Thunderchief was later replaced as a strike aircraft over North Vietnam by both the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II and the swing-wing General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark.

TFX Program

proposal
Boeing's proposal was recommended by the selection board in January 1962, with the exception of the engine, which was not considered acceptable.
The Boeing 818 was the Boeing's candidate for the U.S. military's TFX fighter competition.

General Dynamics

General Dynamics CorporationGeneral Dynamics European Land Combat SystemsGeneral Dynamics Corp.
Developed in the 1960s by General Dynamics, it first entered service in 1967 with the United States Air Force.
The F-111 first flew in December 1964.

Grumman XF10F Jaguar

F10F JaguarGrumman F10F JaguarGrumman XF10F-1 Jaguar
The Navy had tried variable geometry wings with the XF10F Jaguar, but abandoned it in the early 1950s.
Although it never entered service, its research pointed the way toward the later General Dynamics F-111 and Grumman's own F-14 Tomcat.

Pratt & Whitney TF30

TF30Pratt & Whitney JTF10Pratt & Whitney TF30-P-1
The F-111A and B variants used the same airframe structural components and Pratt & Whitney TF30-P-1 turbofan engines.
It was later adapted with an afterburner for supersonic designs, and in this form it was the world's first production afterburning turbofan, going on to power the F-111 and the F-14A Tomcat, as well seeing use in early versions of the A-7 Corsair II without an afterburner.

Carswell Air Force Base

Carswell AFBFort Worth AAFFort Worth, Texas
The F-111A first flew on 21 December 1964 from Carswell Air Force Base, Texas, U.S. The first F-111B was also equipped with ejector seats and first flew on 18 May 1965.
The bulk of the Air Force Convair B-36, B-58 Hustler, F-111 Aardvark, EF-111 Raven and F-16 Fighting Falcon fleets were built there.

Escape crew capsule

escape capsulecrew escape capsuleaircraft crew-escape systems
The cockpit was part of an escape crew capsule.
The General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark used cabin ejection where both side-by-side seats were in a single 3000 lb (1360 kg) capsule.

General Dynamics–Grumman F-111B

F-111BF-111B variantGrumman F-111B
Several of its intended roles, such as an aircraft carrier-based naval interceptor with the F-111B, failed to materialize.
Designed in parallel with the F-111 "Aardvark", which was adopted by the Air Force as a strike aircraft, the F-111B suffered development issues and changing Navy requirements for an aircraft with maneuverability for dogfighting.

Variable-sweep wing

swing-wingvariable fightervariable-geometry wing
The F-111 pioneered several technologies for production aircraft, including variable-sweep wings, afterburning turbofan engines, and automated terrain-following radar for low-level, high-speed flight. The Navy had tried variable geometry wings with the XF10F Jaguar, but abandoned it in the early 1950s.
The United States adopted this configuration for the TFX (Tactical Fighter Experimental) program, which emerged as the General Dynamics F-111, the first production variable-sweep wing aircraft.

Interdictor

strikebomber versiondeep strike/interdiction
The General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark was an American supersonic, medium-range interdictor and tactical attack aircraft that also filled the roles of strategic nuclear bomber, aerial reconnaissance, and electronic-warfare aircraft in its various versions.
An early interdictor was the F-111, an aircraft able to operate at long distances from its base.

Grumman F-14 Tomcat

F-14 TomcatF-14F-14A Tomcat
The U.S. Navy's role intended for the F-111B was instead filled by another variable-geometry design, the Grumman F-14 Tomcat.
The Navy was directed to participate in the Tactical Fighter Experimental (TFX) program with the U.S. Air Force by Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara.

Sukhoi Su-24

Su-24Su-24MSu-24MR
Several other types have followed with similar swing-wing configuration, including the Soviet Sukhoi Su-17 "Fitter" (1965), Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23 "Flogger" (1967), Tupolev Tu-22M "Backfire" (1969), Sukhoi Su-24 "Fencer" (1970) and Tupolev Tu-160 "Blackjack" (1981); the U.S. Rockwell B-1 Lancer bomber (1974); and the European Panavia Tornado (1974).
The resulting F-111 would introduce a variable-geometry wing for greatly increased payload, range, and low-level penetration capabilities.

AGM-69 SRAM

AGM-69 Short Range Attack MissileAGM-69 Short Range Attack Missile (SRAM)AGM-69 short-range attack missile
The FB-111 could carry two AGM-69 SRAM air-to-surface nuclear missiles in its weapons bay.
SRAM entered service in 1972 and was carried by a number of aircraft, including the B-52, FB-111A, and the B-1B.

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23

MiG-23MiG-23BNMiG-23s
Several other types have followed with similar swing-wing configuration, including the Soviet Sukhoi Su-17 "Fitter" (1965), Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23 "Flogger" (1967), Tupolev Tu-22M "Backfire" (1969), Sukhoi Su-24 "Fencer" (1970) and Tupolev Tu-160 "Blackjack" (1981); the U.S. Rockwell B-1 Lancer bomber (1974); and the European Panavia Tornado (1974).
The General Dynamics F-111 and McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II were the main Western influences on the MiG-23.

Tactical Air Command

TACAir Defense, Tactical Air CommandAir Defense – Tactical Air Command (ADTAC)
The Air Force's Tactical Air Command (TAC) was largely concerned with the fighter-bomber and deep strike/interdiction roles.
Designated as the F-111, the Navy version was known as the F-111B and the USAF version the F-111A, with the first flight of the F-111A taking place in December 1964 and the first production models delivered to the USAF in 1967.

GBU-15

AGM-112
The group of 66 F-111Fs dropped almost 80% of the war's laser-guided bombs, including the GBU-15 and the penetrating bunker-buster GBU-28.
It was designed for use with F-15E Strike Eagle, F-111 'Aardvark' and F-4 Phantom II aircraft.

AN/APQ-116

AN/APN-149AN/APQ-115
The Air Force version would carry the AN/APQ-113 attack radar and the AN/APQ-110 terrain-following radar and air-to-ground armament.
K u band terrain-following radar by Texas Instruments for General Dynamics F-111A and RF-4C.

Panavia Tornado

TornadoTornado GR4Tornados
Several other types have followed with similar swing-wing configuration, including the Soviet Sukhoi Su-17 "Fitter" (1965), Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23 "Flogger" (1967), Tupolev Tu-22M "Backfire" (1969), Sukhoi Su-24 "Fencer" (1970) and Tupolev Tu-160 "Blackjack" (1981); the U.S. Rockwell B-1 Lancer bomber (1974); and the European Panavia Tornado (1974).
This approach had been adopted by earlier aircraft, such as the American General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark strike fighter, and the Soviet Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-23 fighter.

1986 United States bombing of Libya

1986 bombing of LibyaOperation El Dorado Canyonbombing of Libya
On 14 April 1986, 18 F-111s and approximately 25 Navy aircraft conducted air strikes against Libya under Operation El Dorado Canyon.
Eighteen F-111F strike aircraft of the 48th Tactical Fighter Wing, flying from RAF Lakenheath and supported by four EF-111A Ravens of the 20th Tactical Fighter Wing from RAF Upper Heyford in England, in conjunction with fifteen A-6, A-7, F/A-18 attack aircraft and EA-6B Prowler Electronic Warfare Aircraft from the aircraft carriers USS Saratoga, USS America and USS Coral Sea on station in the Gulf of Sidra, struck five targets at 02:00 on 15 April, with the stated objectives of sending a message and reducing Libya's ability to support and train terrorists.

Robert McNamara

Robert S. McNamaraMcNamaraSecretary of Defense McNamara
The U.S. Air Force and Navy were both seeking new aircraft when Robert McNamara was appointed Secretary of Defense in January 1961.
McNamara tried to extend his success by merging development programs as well, resulting in the TFX dual service F-111 project.

M117 bomb

M117750 lb M-117M-117
For bombs, the bay could hold two 750 lb (340 kg) M117 conventional bombs, one nuclear bomb or practice bombs.
From the 1950s through the early 1970s the M117 was a standard aircraft weapon, carried by the F-100 Super Sabre, F-104 Starfighter, F-105 Thunderchief, B-57 Canberra, F-111, F-5, A-1 Skyraider, A-4 Skyhawk and F-4 Phantom.