General of the Army (United States)

General of the ArmyGeneralfive-star generalGeneral of the Army of the United StatesArmy GeneralGAU.S. Army GeneralUS General5-Star Army General5-star generals
General of the Army (abbreviated as GA) is a five-star general officer and the second highest possible rank in the United States Army.wikipedia
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Fleet admiral (United States)

Fleet AdmiralFADMAdmiral
A General of the Army ranks immediately above a general and is equivalent to a fleet admiral and a General of the Air Force.
Fleet admiral ranks immediately above admiral and is equivalent to General of the Army and General of the Air Force.

General of the Air Force

GAFGeneralUS Air Force General
A General of the Army ranks immediately above a general and is equivalent to a fleet admiral and a General of the Air Force.
General of the Air Force ranks immediately above a general and is equivalent to General of the Army in the United States Army and Fleet Admiral in the United States Navy.

General (United States)

GeneralGENfour-star general
A General of the Army ranks immediately above a general and is equivalent to a fleet admiral and a General of the Air Force.
General ranks above lieutenant general and below General of the Army or General of the Air Force; the Marine Corps does not have an established grade above general.

John J. Pershing

John PershingGeneral PershingPershing
A special rank of General of the Armies, which ranks above General of the Army, exists but has been conferred only twice, to World War I's John J. Pershing, and posthumously to George Washington, by proclamation 177 years after his death.
After the creation of the five-star General of the Army rank during World War II, his rank of General of the Armies could unofficially be considered that of a six-star general, but he died before the proposed insignia could be considered and acted on by Congress.

General of the Armies

General of the Armies of the United StatesGeneralGen.
A special rank of General of the Armies, which ranks above General of the Army, exists but has been conferred only twice, to World War I's John J. Pershing, and posthumously to George Washington, by proclamation 177 years after his death.
The rank of General of the Armies is equivalent to the Admiral of the Navy and is senior to General of the Army, General of the Air Force, and Fleet Admiral.

Philip Sheridan

Philip H. SheridanSheridanPhillip Sheridan
By an Act of Congress on 1 June 1888, the grade was conferred upon Philip Sheridan, who by then was in failing health.
In 1883, Sheridan was appointed general-in-chief of the U.S. Army, and in 1888 he was promoted to the rank of General of the Army during the term of President Grover Cleveland.

Field marshal (United Kingdom)

Field MarshalBritish Field MarshalList of field marshals of the British Army
It was created to give the most senior American commanders parity of rank with their British counterparts holding the ranks of field marshal and admiral of the fleet.
Part of the rationale was that these ranks were disproportionate to the size of the forces commanded by these officers and that none of the United Kingdom's close allies, such as the United States (which reserves the rank of general of the army for officers who have commanded large armies in major wars), used such ranks.

Douglas MacArthur

General Douglas MacArthurGeneral MacArthurMacArthur
Although the first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS), Omar Bradley, was eventually awarded a fifth star, such a promotion does not come with that office; Bradley's elevation was a political move so that he would not be outranked by his subordinate, Douglas MacArthur.
General of the Army Douglas MacArthur (26 January 1880 – 5 April 1964) was an American five-star general and Field Marshal of the Philippine Army.

Henry H. Arnold

Hap ArnoldHenry "Hap" ArnoldHenry H. "Hap" Arnold
Henry Harley "Hap" Arnold (June 25, 1886 – January 15, 1950) was an American general officer holding the ranks of General of the Army and General of the Air Force.

Omar Bradley

Omar N. BradleyBradleyGeneral Omar Bradley
No officers have been appointed to the rank of General of the Army since Omar Bradley.
General of the Army Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was a senior officer of the United States Army during and after World War II.

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses GrantGrantPresident Grant
On 25 July 1866, the U.S. Congress established the rank of "General of the Army of the United States" for General Ulysses S. Grant.
On July 25, 1866, Congress promoted Grant to the newly created rank of General of the Army of the United States.

George Marshall

George C. MarshallMarshallGeneral George C. Marshall
As Chief of Staff, Marshall organized the largest military expansion in U.S. history, and received promotion to five-star rank as General of the Army.

United States Army

U.S. ArmyUS ArmyArmy
General of the Army (abbreviated as GA) is a five-star general officer and the second highest possible rank in the United States Army.
Although no living officer currently holds the rank of General of the Army, it is still authorized by Congress for use in wartime.

Five-star rank

OF-10five-starfive-star general
General of the Army (abbreviated as GA) is a five-star general officer and the second highest possible rank in the United States Army.

William Tecumseh Sherman

William T. ShermanShermanGeneral Sherman
After Grant became U.S. president, he was succeeded as General of the Army by William T. Sherman, effective 4 March 1869.
On July 25, 1866, Congress created the rank of General of the Army for Grant and then promoted Sherman to lieutenant general.

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight EisenhowerEisenhowerPresident Eisenhower
In recognition of his senior position in the Allied command, on December 20, 1944, he was promoted to General of the Army, equivalent to the rank of Field Marshal in most European armies.

Colin Powell

Colin L. PowellGeneral Colin PowellPowell
After the conclusion of the Persian Gulf War, but before his tenure as Secretary of State, there was talk of awarding a fifth star to General Colin Powell, who had served as CJCS during the conflict.
During his chairmanship of the JCS, there was discussion of awarding Powell a fifth star, granting him the rank of General of the Army.

Field marshal

field-marshalMarshalFeldmarschall
Although briefly considered, the U.S. Army did not introduce a rank of Field Marshal.
On 14 December 1944, Congress created the rank of "general of the army", a five-star rank equivalent to that of field marshal in other countries.

General officers in the United States

generalgeneral officergeneral officers
They are the General of the Army (in the Army, equivalent to the foreign rank of field marshal), Fleet Admiral (in the Navy), and General of the Air Force (in the Air Force).

Aide-de-camp

aide de campADCaides-de-camp
They were entitled to an office maintained by the Army along with an aide (of the rank of colonel), a secretary, and an orderly.

Supreme Allied Commander

Supreme CommanderSupreme Allied CommandAllied Supreme Commander
General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower served in successive Supreme Allied Commander roles.

United States Army officer rank insignia

American ranking systemksofficer
While not currently in use today, special insignia were authorized by Congress for ten general officers who were promoted to the highest ranks in the United States Army: general of the army, designed as a "five-star" rank, and general of the armies, considered to be the equivalent of a "six-star" rank.

Norman Schwarzkopf Jr.

Norman SchwarzkopfNorman Schwarzkopf, Jr.H. Norman Schwarzkopf
An effort was also made to promote General Norman Schwarzkopf Jr. to General of the Army, although it was not carried out.
He was initially considered for promotion alternatively to General of the Army or to Army Chief of Staff, and was ultimately asked to assume the latter post, but he declined.

Six-star rank

O-11Six-starsix-star general
On 21 January 1955, a draft resolution was proposed to the U.S. Senate to authorize the then-U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower to appoint Douglas MacArthur, then a five-star General of the Army, to the elevated six-star rank of "General of the Armies of the United States in recognition of the great services to his country", with "such appointment to take effect as of the seventy-fifth anniversary of his birth, January 26, 1955."

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

ChairmanChairman of the Joint ChiefsChairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
Although the first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS), Omar Bradley, was eventually awarded a fifth star, such a promotion does not come with that office; Bradley's elevation was a political move so that he would not be outranked by his subordinate, Douglas MacArthur.