Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act

Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008Genetic Information Non-discrimination ActGenetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA)Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA)Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (Public Law 110–233)GINA
The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (, GINA ), is an Act of Congress in the United States designed to prohibit some types of genetic discrimination.wikipedia
101 Related Articles

Genetic discrimination

forbiddenGenismgenoism
The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (, GINA ), is an Act of Congress in the United States designed to prohibit some types of genetic discrimination.
Genetic discrimination is illegal in the U.S. after passage of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) on May 21, 2008.

Louise Slaughter

Louise M. SlaughterLouise McIntosh SlaughterRepresentative Louise Slaughter (D-NY)
In 2003, GINA was introduced as, by Louise Slaughter, D-NY, and as by Senator Snowe, R-ME. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2007 was introduced into the United States House of Representatives as by Representatives Slaughter, Biggert, Eshoo, and Walden.
Slaughter was the lead House sponsor of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which became law in 2008.

George W. Bush

BushPresident BushPresident George W. Bush
President George W. Bush signed the bill into law on May 21, 2008.
On May 21, 2008, Bush signed into law the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA).

Genetic predisposition

predispositiongenetically predisposedpredispose
The act bars the use of genetic information in health insurance and employment: it prohibits group health plans and health insurers from denying coverage to a healthy individual or charging that person higher premiums based solely on a genetic predisposition to developing a disease in the future, and it bars employers from using individuals' genetic information when making hiring, firing, job placement, or promotion decisions.
The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which was signed into law by President Bush on May 21, 2008, prohibits discrimination in employment and health insurance based on genetic information.

Tom Coburn

CoburnThomas A. CoburnCoburn, Tom
It had been subject of a "hold" placed by Tom Coburn, M.D., Republican U.S. Senator from Oklahoma.
According to the Boston Globe, Coburn initially blocked passage of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA), objecting to provisions in the bill that allow discrimination based on genetic information from embryos and fetuses.

Genetic privacy

genetic datagenetic information privacyprivacy of genetic information
Legal regulations, such as the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) in the United States have been created to mandate that an individual's genomic sequence information cannot be requested or used as a basis for genetic discrimination by employers or health insurance providers, though this protection did not extend to other forms of insurance such as life insurance.

Gattaca

1997 science fiction movieGattaca'' critical reception

Act of Congress

Public LawactActs of Congress
The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (, GINA ), is an Act of Congress in the United States designed to prohibit some types of genetic discrimination.

Nucleic acid sequence

DNA sequencesnucleotide sequencegenetic information
The act bars the use of genetic information in health insurance and employment: it prohibits group health plans and health insurers from denying coverage to a healthy individual or charging that person higher premiums based solely on a genetic predisposition to developing a disease in the future, and it bars employers from using individuals' genetic information when making hiring, firing, job placement, or promotion decisions.

Health insurance

medical insurancehealthhealth benefits
The act bars the use of genetic information in health insurance and employment: it prohibits group health plans and health insurers from denying coverage to a healthy individual or charging that person higher premiums based solely on a genetic predisposition to developing a disease in the future, and it bars employers from using individuals' genetic information when making hiring, firing, job placement, or promotion decisions.

Employment

employeeemployeremployees
The act bars the use of genetic information in health insurance and employment: it prohibits group health plans and health insurers from denying coverage to a healthy individual or charging that person higher premiums based solely on a genetic predisposition to developing a disease in the future, and it bars employers from using individuals' genetic information when making hiring, firing, job placement, or promotion decisions.

Recruitment

recruiterrecruitinghiring
The act bars the use of genetic information in health insurance and employment: it prohibits group health plans and health insurers from denying coverage to a healthy individual or charging that person higher premiums based solely on a genetic predisposition to developing a disease in the future, and it bars employers from using individuals' genetic information when making hiring, firing, job placement, or promotion decisions.

Dismissal (employment)

releasefiredsacked
The act bars the use of genetic information in health insurance and employment: it prohibits group health plans and health insurers from denying coverage to a healthy individual or charging that person higher premiums based solely on a genetic predisposition to developing a disease in the future, and it bars employers from using individuals' genetic information when making hiring, firing, job placement, or promotion decisions.

Promotion (rank)

promotionpromotedpromotions
The act bars the use of genetic information in health insurance and employment: it prohibits group health plans and health insurers from denying coverage to a healthy individual or charging that person higher premiums based solely on a genetic predisposition to developing a disease in the future, and it bars employers from using individuals' genetic information when making hiring, firing, job placement, or promotion decisions.

Ted Kennedy

Edward KennedyEdward M. KennedyTeddy Kennedy
Senator Ted Kennedy called it the "first major new civil rights bill of the new century." The same bill was introduced into the United States Senate as by Senators Olympia Snowe, Ted Kennedy, Mike Enzi, and Christopher Dodd.

Civil and political rights

civil rightscivil rights activistpolitical rights
Senator Ted Kennedy called it the "first major new civil rights bill of the new century."

Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974

Employee Retirement Income Security ActERISAEmployee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA)
The Act contains amendments to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 and the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.

Ron Paul

Congressman Ron PaulPaulPaul, Ron
The bill was then sent back to the House of Representatives and passed 414-1 on May 1; the lone dissenter was Congressman Ron Paul.

United States House of Representatives

U.S. RepresentativeU.S. House of RepresentativesUnited States Representative
The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2007 was introduced into the United States House of Representatives as by Representatives Slaughter, Biggert, Eshoo, and Walden.

Judy Biggert

BiggertBiggert, Judy
The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2007 was introduced into the United States House of Representatives as by Representatives Slaughter, Biggert, Eshoo, and Walden.

Anna Eshoo

Anna G. EshooEshooEshoo, Anna
The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2007 was introduced into the United States House of Representatives as by Representatives Slaughter, Biggert, Eshoo, and Walden.

Greg Walden

Rep. Greg Walden (R, OR-2)Gregory P. WaldenRep. Greg Walden (R-OR)
The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2007 was introduced into the United States House of Representatives as by Representatives Slaughter, Biggert, Eshoo, and Walden.

United States Senate

U.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. Senate
It had been subject of a "hold" placed by Tom Coburn, M.D., Republican U.S. Senator from Oklahoma. The same bill was introduced into the United States Senate as by Senators Olympia Snowe, Ted Kennedy, Mike Enzi, and Christopher Dodd.