A report on Geneva

A view of Geneva by Frances Elizabeth Wynne, 4 August 1858
L'Escalade is what Genevans call the failed surprise attack of 12 December 1602 by troops sent by Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy, to take Geneva. This imaginative image was drawn by Matthias Quad, or the workshop of Frans Hogenberg, around 1603. Invaders are pictured crossing the moat in the center left while reinforcements are entering Plainpalais at the bottom. A column of defenders is in the center, headed toward the Savoyards. Lake Léman is at center top.
Aerial view (1966)
Satellite view of Geneva; Cointrin Airport is centre left.
The Geneva area seen from the Salève in France. The Jura mountains are on the horizon.
Confluence of the Rhône and the Arve
Average temperature and precipitation 1961–1990
Coat of arms of Geneva as part of the pavement in front of the Reformation Wall, 2013
The Flowered Clock at the Quai du Général-Guisan (English Garden), during the 2012 Geneva Festival
Rue Pierre-Fatio in Geneva
Apartment buildings in the Quartier des Grottes
Geneva, with Lake Geneva in the background
Reformation Wall in Geneva; from left to right: William Farel, John Calvin, Theodore Beza, and John Knox
Fireworks at the Fêtes de Genève, 2012
Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
The University of Geneva.
Geneva railway station
TCMC (Tramway Cornavin – Meyrin – CERN)
Geneva Sécheron railway station
TOSA Bus at PALEXPO Flash bus stops
The World Intellectual Property Organization.
The assembly hall of the Palace of Nations.
Gustave Ador
Christiane Brunner
John Calvin, c. 1550
Isaac Casaubon
Michel Decastel, 2012
Jean Henri Dunant, 1901
Kat Graham, 2017
Francois Huber
Paul Lachenal, 1939
Lenin in Switzerland, 1916
Amelie Mauresmo, 2014
Liliane Maury Pasquier, 2007
Pierre Prévost
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Ferdinand de Saussure
Michael Schade, 2012
Michel Simon, 1964
Johann Vogel, 2006
Voltaire
St. Pierre Cathedral
Collège Calvin
International Committee of the Red Cross (CICR)
Conservatory and Botanical Garden of the City of Geneva
Notre-Dame Church
Russian Orthodox Church
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
Hôtel de Ville and the Tour Baudet
Institut et Musée Voltaire
Mallet House and Museum international de la Réforme
Tavel House
Brunswick Monument
Musée d'Art et d'Histoire
The Villa La Grange

Second-most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich) and the most populous city of Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland.

- Geneva
A view of Geneva by Frances Elizabeth Wynne, 4 August 1858

322 related topics with Alpha

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Door of the Theses in Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany

Protestantism

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Form of Christianity that follows the tenets of the Protestant Reformation: a major movement within Western Christianity that began in the 16th century against what its followers perceived to be errors, abuses, innovations, discrepancies, and theological novums within the medieval Catholic Church.

Form of Christianity that follows the tenets of the Protestant Reformation: a major movement within Western Christianity that began in the 16th century against what its followers perceived to be errors, abuses, innovations, discrepancies, and theological novums within the medieval Catholic Church.

Door of the Theses in Wittenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany
The Trinity is the belief that God is one God in three persons: the Father, the Son (Jesus), and the Holy Spirit
A Lutheran depiction of the Last Supper by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1547
Execution of Jan Hus in 1415
Spread of Lollardy in medieval England and medieval Scotland
Wessel Gansfort
Distribution of Protestantism and Catholicism in Central Europe on the eve of the Thirty Years' War (1618)
1839 Methodist camp meeting during the Second Great Awakening in the U.S.
Dissatisfaction with the outcome of a disputation in 1525 prompted Swiss Brethren to part ways with Huldrych Zwingli
Glass window in the town church of Wiesloch (Stadtkirche Wiesloch) with Martin Luther and John Calvin commemorating the 1821 union of Lutheran and Reformed churches in the Grand Duchy of Baden
Historical chart of the main Protestant branches
Indonesian Reformed Evangelical Church megachurch
Links between interdenominational movements and other developments within Protestantism
Hillsong Church Konstanz, Germany, an evangelical charismatic church
Jacobus Arminius was a Dutch Reformed theologian, whose views influenced parts of Protestantism. A small Remonstrant community remains in the Netherlands.
Karl Barth, often regarded as the greatest Protestant theologian of the twentieth century
Columbia University, established by the Church of England
Enlightenment philosopher John Locke argued for individual conscience, free from state control
St. Peter's Church (1612), the oldest surviving Protestant church in the "New World" (the Americas and certain Atlantic Ocean islands), the first of nine Parish churches established in Bermuda by the Church of England. Bermuda also has the oldest Presbyterian church outside the British Isles, the Church of Scotland's Christ Church (1719).
James Springer White and his wife, Ellen G. White founded the Seventh-day Adventist Church.
An Adventist pastor baptizes a young man in Mozambique.
Loma Linda University Seventh-day Adventist Church in Loma Linda, California, United States.
Dirk Willems saves his pursuer. This act of mercy led to his recapture, after which he was burned at the stake.
An Amish family in a horse-drawn square buggy.
Alexanderwohl Mennonite Church in rural Goessel, Kansas, United States.
Thomas Cranmer, one of the most influential figures in shaping Anglican theology and self-identity.
The various editions of the Book of Common Prayer contain the words of structured services of worship in the Anglican Church.
British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey, a royal peculiar under the direct jurisdiction of the monarch.
Roger Williams was an early proponent of religious freedom and the separation of church and state.
Baptists subscribe to a doctrine that baptism should be performed only for professing believers.
The First Baptist Church in America. Baptists are roughly one-third of U.S. Protestants.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.pewforum.org/2015/05/12/appendix-b-classification-of-protestant-denominations/|title=Appendix B: Classification of Protestant Denominations|date=12 May 2015}}</ref>
John Calvin's theological thought influenced a variety of Congregational, Continental Reformed, United, Presbyterian, and other Reformed churches.
The Ordination of Elders in a Scottish Kirk, by John Henry Lorimer, 1891.
A Congregational church in Cheshire, Connecticut, United States.
Luther's rose seal, a symbol of Lutheranism
Luther composed hymns still used today, including "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God"
Moses and Elijah direct the sinner looking for salvation to the cross in this painting illustrating Luther's Theology of the Cross (as opposed to a Theology of Glory).
John Wesley, the primary founder of the Methodism.
A United Methodist elder celebrating the Eucharist.
Methodist Central Hall in Westminster, London.
Charles Fox Parham, who associated glossolalia with the baptism in the Holy Spirit.
Contemporary Christian worship in Rock Harbor Church, Costa Mesa, United States.
A Pentecostal church in Ravensburg, Germany.
George Fox was an English dissenter and a founder of the Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as the Quakers or Friends.
Friedensthal Moravian Church Christiansted, St Croix, USVI founded in 1755.
A night shelter of The Salvation Army in Geneva, Switzerland.
William Wilberforce, a British evangelical abolitionist.
Billy Graham, a prominent evangelical revivalist, preaching in Duisburg, Germany in 1954.
Worship service at Église Nouvelle vie, an evangelical Pentecostal church in Longueuil, Canada.
An Evangelical Protestant church in Hämeenlinna, Finland.
Philipp Jakob Spener, German pioneer and founder of Pietism.
Pietism has been a strong cultural influence in Scandinavia.
The Broad and the Narrow Way, a popular German Pietist painting, 1866.
John Cotton, who sparked the Antinomian Controversy with his free grace theology.
Pilgrim Fathers landing at Plymouth Rock in 1620.
Built in 1681, the Old Ship Church in Hingham, Massachusetts is the oldest church in America in continuous ecclesiastical use.<ref>{{Cite news|last = Butterfield|first = Fox|title = The Perfect New England Town|url = https://www.nytimes.com/1989/05/14/travel/the-perfect-new-england-village.html?sec=&spon=|newspaper = The New York Times|date = 14 May 1989|access-date = 30 May 2010}}</ref>
Luther Monument in Worms, which features some of the Reformation's crucial figures.
The International Monument to the Reformation in Geneva, Switzerland.
The Adoration of the Trinity  by Albrecht Dürer.
The Crucifixion of Christ by Lucas Cranach the Elder.
The Adam and Eve by Lucas Cranach the Younger.
A Huguenot, on St. Bartholomew's Day, Refusing to Shield Himself from Danger by Wearing the Roman Catholic Badge by John Everett Millais.
The Return of the Prodigal Son, detail, c. 1669 by Rembrandt.
The Church at Auvers, 1890. Musée d'Orsay, Paris. By Vincent van Gogh.
Protestant majority countries in 2010.
Countries by percentage of Protestants.
Protestantism as state religion:
Lutheranism
Anglicanism
Calvinism
Methodism
A Moravian diener serves bread to fellow members of her congregation during the celebration of a lovefest (2015).
A hymnal of the Free Methodist Church, a Methodist denomination aligned with the holiness movement.

After the expulsion of its Bishop in 1526, and the unsuccessful attempts of the Bern reformer William Farel, Calvin was asked to use the organisational skill he had gathered as a student of law to discipline the city of Geneva.

Strasbourg seen from Spot Satellite

Strasbourg

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Prefecture and largest city of the Grand Est region of eastern France and the official seat of the European Parliament.

Prefecture and largest city of the Grand Est region of eastern France and the official seat of the European Parliament.

Strasbourg seen from Spot Satellite
Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor visiting Strasbourg in 1414, detail of a painting by Léo Schnug
Panorama from the Barrage Vauban with the medieval bridge Ponts Couverts in the foreground (the fourth tower is hidden by trees at the left) and the cathedral in the distance on the right.
La Petite France during golden hour
Strasbourg, Cathedral of Our Lady
Place du Marché aux Cochons de Lait.
Place Gutenberg with statue of Gutenberg and Carousel.
Maison des tanneurs.
View of the Ill with Église Saint-Thomas.
The baroque organ of the Église Saint-Thomas
Place Kléber
The Pavillon Joséphine (rear side) in the Parc de l'Orangerie
The Château de Pourtalès (front side) in the park of the same name
A room in the Musée des Arts décoratifs
The Ill, seen from the terrace of the Palais Rohan
Lateral view of the National Library.
One of Strasbourg's trams passes over one of its canals, whilst a tourist trip boat passes underneath
The Palace of Europe of the Council of Europe
Stade de la Meinau, home of RC Strasbourg

Together with Basel (Bank for International Settlements), Geneva (United Nations), The Hague (International Court of Justice) and New York City (United Nations world headquarters), Strasbourg is among the few cities in the world that is not a state capital that hosts international organisations of the first order.

Romandy

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French-speaking part of western Switzerland.

French-speaking part of western Switzerland.

French-speaking population in the Canton of Fribourg in 2000.
A road sign in Saint-Gingolph, Valais, spelling a dialectal greeting bondzo! alongside the Standard French bienvenue (2013 photograph).

The majority of the romand population lives in the western part of the country, especially the Arc Lémanique region along Lake Geneva, connecting Geneva, Vaud and the Lower Valais.

Vaud

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One of the 26 cantons forming the Swiss Confederation.

One of the 26 cantons forming the Swiss Confederation.

Logo of the canton of Vaud
Roman column in Nyon
Bailiwicks of Bern in Vaud in the 18th century
Built by the Bishop of Lausanne during the 15th century, Château Saint-Maire has been the seat of the cantonal government since 1803
Vevey, Lake Geneva, and the Swiss Alps
Vallée de Joux, Jura
Montreux and Lake Geneva
The room of the Grand Council of Vaud, the parliament of the canton of Vaud
Districts of canton of Vaud
Lausanne, capital and largest city in Vaud
Lavaux vineyards above Lake Geneva

On the other hand, there are three enclaves of the canton of Fribourg (Estavayer-le-lac, Vuissens, Surpierre), as well as two enclaves of the canton of Geneva (Céligny), that are surrounded by the canton of Vaud.

Grand Genève

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Map of the Léman Express rail network, as of 2019.

Grand Genève ("Greater Geneva" in English) is a Local Grouping of Transnational Cooperation (in French: groupement local de coopération transfrontalière, or GLCT), a public entity under Swiss law, in charge of organizing cooperation within the cross-border metropolitan area of Geneva (in particular metropolitan transports).

Rhône

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Major river in France and Switzerland, rising in the Alps and flowing west and south through Lake Geneva and southeastern France before discharging into the Mediterranean Sea.

Major river in France and Switzerland, rising in the Alps and flowing west and south through Lake Geneva and southeastern France before discharging into the Mediterranean Sea.

The source of the Rhône, at the foot of the Rhône Glacier, above Oberwald.
The Rhône flowing through the valleys of the Swiss Alps and arriving into Lake Geneva, in Switzerland.
Mouth of the Rhone
Pont du Mont-Blanc in Geneva, marking the outflow from Lake Geneva (right)
The Rhône in Lyon under the old Boucle's Bridge
The Rhône at Avignon
Almost all tributaries more than 36 km long. The portion of the Rhône above Brig-Glis is labelled by its native Walliser German name, Rotten

Lake Geneva ends in the city of Geneva, where the lake level is controlled by the.

Logo of the city of Zürich

Zürich

7 links

Largest city in Switzerland and the capital of the canton of Zürich.

Largest city in Switzerland and the capital of the canton of Zürich.

Logo of the city of Zürich
Johann Balthasar Bullinger's imagining of Zürich in Roman times (engraving 1773)
40 Batzen Zürich, 1813
A scene depicting the Old Zürich War in 1443 (1514, illustration in Federal Chronicle by Werner Schodoler)
The Murerplan of 1576
Fighting on the Paradeplatz during the Züriputsch
Bahnhofplatz in 1900
Aerial view (1961)
The coat of arms on the Town Hall
Zürich's twelve municipal districts
The Limmat in Zürich
The city stretches on both sides of the Limmat, which flows out of Lake Zürich. The Alps can be seen from the city center, background to the lake.
Topographic map of Zürich and surroundings
Felsenegg from Lake Zürich
Zürich from Waidberg
A paddle steamer on Lake Zürich
The busy Hauptbahnhof main hall
Augustinergasse in the old town
The Bahnhofstrasse seen from Paradeplatz
Fresco inside Amtshaus 1
Entrance to Amtshaus 1
Information pamphlet providing information about why these frescos were made
The 88-metre Sunrise Tower (2005) was the first approved high-rise building in twenty years.
Main building of the University of Zürich
Swiss television's building
Opening of the Zurich Film Festival (2008)
Zürich during the Street Parade (2008)
Opernhaus
Zürich at night
FIFA Headquarters
2007 Zürich Weltklasse
Inside the "Oepfelchammer", in which the so-called Balkenprobe takes place
Altstadt Zürich
Zurich Aerial panorama 040622 facing the Zurich See

The A1 heads west towards Bern and Geneva and eastwards towards St. Gallen; the A4 leads northwards to Schaffhausen and southwards to Altdorf connecting with the A2 towards Chiasso; and the A3 heads northwest towards Basel and southeast along Lake Zürich and Lake Walen towards Sargans.

Jean Pécolat (in French) being tortured in 1517 under the order of Jean-François de Savoie (in French), Bishop of Geneva

Roman Catholic Diocese of Geneva

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Latin Catholic diocese in part of Switzerland and Savoy from 400 to 1801 when it merged with the Diocese of Chambéry.

Latin Catholic diocese in part of Switzerland and Savoy from 400 to 1801 when it merged with the Diocese of Chambéry.

Jean Pécolat (in French) being tortured in 1517 under the order of Jean-François de Savoie (in French), Bishop of Geneva

Geneva was first recorded as a border town, fortified against the Helvetii (Celto-Germanic people).

Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies

6 links

one of the institute's campus sites, the Maison de la paix
Maison de la paix.
The Davis Library of the Maison de la paix
The Villa Barton campus on the shores of Lake Geneva.
Earlier logo of the Graduate Institute of International Studies (HEI)
IHEID's later logo at Villa Barton's main gate.
Maison de la paix ("House of Peace").
The Villa Moynier campus
Kofi Annan, former UN secretary-general, 1997–2006 and Nobel Peace prize recipient
Mohamed ElBaradei, IAEA director-general, 1997–2009, former vice-president of Egypt and Nobel Peace Prize recipient
Micheline Calmy-Rey, former Swiss foreign minister and president of the Swiss Federal Council, 2007 and 2011
Philipp Hildebrand, head of the Swiss National Bank, 2010–2012, currently vice-chairman of BlackRock
Leonid Hurwicz, Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences co-recipient
Jakob Kellenberger, president of the ICRC (2000–2012), and current professor at the institute
Brad Smith, president and chief legal officer at Microsoft, non-executive director at Netflix
Patricia Espinosa, Mexican secretary of foreign affairs, 2006–2012, diplomat and executive secretary of the UNFCCC, 2016–present
Saul Friedländer, Israeli historian and Pulitzer Prize winner
Henri, Grand Duke of Luxembourg, 2000–present
Hans-Gert Pöttering, president of the European Parliament, 2007–2009
Jakaya Kikwete, the fourth president of Tanzania(2005–2015) and the Minister of Foreign Affairs (1995–2005) of Tanzania
Alpha Oumar Konaré, the president of Mali (1992 to 2002), and chairperson of the African Union Commission (2003 to 2008)

The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, or the Geneva Graduate Institute (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développement, previously known as Institut des hautes études internationales), abbreviated IHEID (previously HEI, IHEI, or IUHEI), is a government-accredited postgraduate institution of higher education located in Geneva, Switzerland.

Map of the Roman province Maxima Sequanorum (c. 300 AD), which comprised the territories of a part of the Helvetii, Sequani and several smaller tribes. The relative locations of the Helvetian pagi Tigurini and Verbigeni, though indicated on the map, remain unknown.

Helvetii

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The Helvetii (Helvētiī, Gaulish: *Heluētī), anglicized as Helvetians, were a Celtic tribe or tribal confederation occupying most of the Swiss plateau at the time of their contact with the Roman Republic in the 1st century BC. According to Julius Caesar, the Helvetians were divided into four subgroups or pagi. Of these, Caesar names only the Verbigeni and the Tigurini, while Posidonius mentions the Tigurini and the Tougeni (Τωυγενοί).

The Helvetii (Helvētiī, Gaulish: *Heluētī), anglicized as Helvetians, were a Celtic tribe or tribal confederation occupying most of the Swiss plateau at the time of their contact with the Roman Republic in the 1st century BC. According to Julius Caesar, the Helvetians were divided into four subgroups or pagi. Of these, Caesar names only the Verbigeni and the Tigurini, while Posidonius mentions the Tigurini and the Tougeni (Τωυγενοί).

Map of the Roman province Maxima Sequanorum (c. 300 AD), which comprised the territories of a part of the Helvetii, Sequani and several smaller tribes. The relative locations of the Helvetian pagi Tigurini and Verbigeni, though indicated on the map, remain unknown.
«Die Helvetier zwingen die Römer unter dem Joch hindurch» ("The Helvetians force the Romans to pass under the yoke"). Romantic painting by Charles Gleyre (19th century) celebrating the Helvetian victory over the Romans at Agen (107 BC) under Divico's command.
Julius Caesar and Divico parley after the battle at the Saône. Historic painting of the 19th century by Karl Jauslin.
Roman provinces in AD 14
Celtic (orange) and Raetic (green) settlements in Switzerland

When they reached the boundaries of the Allobroges, the northernmost tribe of the Provincia, they found that Caesar had already dismantled the bridge of Geneva to stop their advance.