A report on Geneva

A view of Geneva by Frances Elizabeth Wynne, 4 August 1858
L'Escalade is what Genevans call the failed surprise attack of 12 December 1602 by troops sent by Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy, to take Geneva. This imaginative image was drawn by Matthias Quad, or the workshop of Frans Hogenberg, around 1603. Invaders are pictured crossing the moat in the center left while reinforcements are entering Plainpalais at the bottom. A column of defenders is in the center, headed toward the Savoyards. Lake Léman is at center top.
Aerial view (1966)
Satellite view of Geneva; Cointrin Airport is centre left.
The Geneva area seen from the Salève in France. The Jura mountains are on the horizon.
Confluence of the Rhône and the Arve
Average temperature and precipitation 1961–1990
Coat of arms of Geneva as part of the pavement in front of the Reformation Wall, 2013
The Flowered Clock at the Quai du Général-Guisan (English Garden), during the 2012 Geneva Festival
Rue Pierre-Fatio in Geneva
Apartment buildings in the Quartier des Grottes
Geneva, with Lake Geneva in the background
Reformation Wall in Geneva; from left to right: William Farel, John Calvin, Theodore Beza, and John Knox
Fireworks at the Fêtes de Genève, 2012
Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
The University of Geneva.
Geneva railway station
TCMC (Tramway Cornavin – Meyrin – CERN)
Geneva Sécheron railway station
TOSA Bus at PALEXPO Flash bus stops
The World Intellectual Property Organization.
The assembly hall of the Palace of Nations.
Gustave Ador
Christiane Brunner
John Calvin, c. 1550
Isaac Casaubon
Michel Decastel, 2012
Jean Henri Dunant, 1901
Kat Graham, 2017
Francois Huber
Paul Lachenal, 1939
Lenin in Switzerland, 1916
Amelie Mauresmo, 2014
Liliane Maury Pasquier, 2007
Pierre Prévost
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Ferdinand de Saussure
Michael Schade, 2012
Michel Simon, 1964
Johann Vogel, 2006
Voltaire
St. Pierre Cathedral
Collège Calvin
International Committee of the Red Cross (CICR)
Conservatory and Botanical Garden of the City of Geneva
Notre-Dame Church
Russian Orthodox Church
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
Hôtel de Ville and the Tour Baudet
Institut et Musée Voltaire
Mallet House and Museum international de la Réforme
Tavel House
Brunswick Monument
Musée d'Art et d'Histoire
The Villa La Grange

Second-most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich) and the most populous city of Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland.

- Geneva
A view of Geneva by Frances Elizabeth Wynne, 4 August 1858

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The Chamonix Valley seen from La Flégère with the Mont Blanc in the background

Chamonix

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Commune in the Haute-Savoie department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region of southeastern France.

Commune in the Haute-Savoie department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region of southeastern France.

The Chamonix Valley seen from La Flégère with the Mont Blanc in the background
Horace-Benedict de Saussure, with Jacques Balmat (left) who points towards the summit of Mont Blanc, Monument at Chamonix.
Chamonix Valley: crossing the glacier on foot (between 1902 and 1904)
Front and façade of the Chamonix - Mont-Blanc railway station.
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In 1530, the inhabitants obtained from the Count of the Genevois the privilege of holding two fairs a year, while the valley was often visited by the civil officials and by the bishops of Geneva (first recorded visit in 1411, while St. Francis de Sales came there in 1606).

International Labour Organization

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United Nations agency whose mandate is to advance social and economic justice through setting international labour standards.

United Nations agency whose mandate is to advance social and economic justice through setting international labour standards.

ILO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland
International Labour Organization flag
Samuel Gompers (right) with Albert Thomas, 1918
Greenwood, Ernest H. (of the United States – Deputy secretary general of the conference) / Secretary General: Mr. Harold B. Butler (Great Britain) / Deputy Secretaries General: Mr. Ernest H. Greenwood (United States) / Dr. Guido Pardo (Italy) /Legal Adviser: Dr. Manley 0. Hudson (United States) / with staff of the first International Labour Conference, in Washington, D.C., in 1919, in front of the Pan American Union Building
Ratifications of 1976 Tripartite Consultation Convention
Centre William Rappard, seat of the ILO between 1926-1974, now hosting the WTO
ILO office in Santiago, Chile
These young boys are among the millions of children in child labour worldwide. They work at a brickyard in Antsirabe, Madagascar.
Parties to ILO's 1973 Minimum Age Convention, and the minimum ages they have designated: purple, 14 years; green, 15 years; blue, 16 years
Krychów forced labour camp 1940 (Krowie Bagno)
Ratifications of the ILO's 1930 Forced Labour Convention, with non-ratifiers shown in red
Ratifications of the ILO's 1957 Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, with non-ratifiers shown in red

It is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, with around 40 field offices around the world, and employs some 3,381 staff across 107 nations, of whom 1,698 work in technical cooperation programmes and projects.

The Cross of Mathilde, a crux gemmata made for Mathilde, Abbess of Essen (973–1011), who is shown kneeling before the Virgin and Child in the enamel plaque. The figure of Christ is slightly later. Probably made in Cologne or Essen, the cross demonstrates several medieval techniques: cast figurative sculpture, filigree, enamelling, gem polishing and setting, and the reuse of Classical cameos and engraved gems.

Middle Ages

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In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages or medieval period lasted approximately from the 5th to the late 15th centuries, similar to the post-classical period of global history.

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages or medieval period lasted approximately from the 5th to the late 15th centuries, similar to the post-classical period of global history.

The Cross of Mathilde, a crux gemmata made for Mathilde, Abbess of Essen (973–1011), who is shown kneeling before the Virgin and Child in the enamel plaque. The figure of Christ is slightly later. Probably made in Cologne or Essen, the cross demonstrates several medieval techniques: cast figurative sculpture, filigree, enamelling, gem polishing and setting, and the reuse of Classical cameos and engraved gems.
A late Roman sculpture depicting the Tetrarchs, now in Venice, Italy
Barbarian kingdoms and tribes after the end of the Western Roman Empire
A coin of the Ostrogothic leader Theoderic the Great, struck in Milan, Italy, c. AD 491–501
A mosaic showing Justinian with the bishop of Ravenna (Italy), bodyguards, and courtiers.
Reconstruction of an early medieval peasant village in Bavaria
An 11th-century illustration of Gregory the Great dictating to a secretary
Map showing growth of Frankish power from 481 to 814
Charlemagne's palace chapel at Aachen, completed in 805
10th-century Ottonian ivory plaque depicting Christ receiving a church from Otto I
A page from the Book of Kells, an illuminated manuscript created in the British Isles in the late 8th or early 9th century
Medieval French manuscript illustration of the three classes of medieval society: those who prayed (the clergy) those who fought (the knights), and those who worked (the peasantry). The relationship between these classes was governed by feudalism and manorialism. (Li Livres dou Sante, 13th century)
13th-century illustration of a Jew (in pointed Jewish hat) and the Christian Petrus Alphonsi debating
Europe and the Mediterranean Sea in 1190
The Bayeux Tapestry (detail) showing William the Conqueror (centre), his half-brothers Robert, Count of Mortain (right) and Odo, Bishop of Bayeux in the Duchy of Normandy (left)
Krak des Chevaliers was built during the Crusades for the Knights Hospitallers.
A medieval scholar making precise measurements in a 14th-century manuscript illustration
Portrait of Cardinal Hugh of Saint-Cher by Tommaso da Modena, 1352, the first known depiction of spectacles
The Romanesque Church of Maria Laach, Germany
The Gothic interior of Laon Cathedral, France
Francis of Assisi, depicted by Bonaventura Berlinghieri in 1235, founded the Franciscan Order.
Sénanque Abbey, Gordes, France
Execution of some of the ringleaders of the jacquerie, from a 14th-century manuscript of the Chroniques de France ou de St Denis
Map of Europe in 1360
Joan of Arc in a 15th-century depiction
Guy of Boulogne crowning Pope Gregory XI in a 15th-century miniature from Froissart's Chroniques
Clerics studying astronomy and geometry, French, early 15th century
Agricultural calendar, c. 1470, from a manuscript of Pietro de Crescenzi
February scene from the 15th-century illuminated manuscript Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry
Medieval illustration of the spherical Earth in a 14th-century copy of L'Image du monde
The early Muslim conquests
Expansion under Muhammad, 622–632
Expansion during the Rashidun Caliphate, 632–661
Expansion during the Umayyad Caliphate, 661–750

Between today's Geneva and Lyon, it grew to become the realm of Burgundy in the late 5th and early 6th centuries.

St. Pierre Cathedral

St. Pierre Cathedral

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St. Pierre Cathedral
The nave of St. Pierre Cathedral
Chapelle of St. Pierre Cathedral
Spire of St. Pierre Cathedral
Front entrance of the Cathedral at night
John Calvin's chair
Jet d'Eau from the north tower of the Cathedral
Ceiling of the Maccabees Chapel

St. Pierre Cathedral in Geneva, Switzerland, was built as a Roman Catholic cathedral, but became a Reformed Protestant Church of Geneva church during the Reformation.

Lutheran World Federation

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The Lutheran World Federation (LWF; Lutherischer Weltbund) is a global communion of national and regional Lutheran denominations headquartered in the Ecumenical Centre in Geneva, Switzerland.

The Plainpalais, 2011.

Plainpalais

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The Plainpalais, 2011.
Plainpalais is shown bottom left in this imaginative drawing by Matthias Quad, or the workshop of Franz Hogenberg, around 1603, illustrating the failed surprise attack of 12 December 1602 by the Duke of Savoy to take Geneva. Invaders are pictured crossing the moat in the center left while their reinforcements are entering Plainpalais at the bottom. A column of defenders is in the center, headed toward the Savoyards. Lake Léman is at center top.

Plainpalais is a neighbourhood in Geneva, Switzerland, and a former municipality of the Canton of Geneva.

Logo of the city of Lausanne

Lausanne

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Capital and largest city of the Swiss french speaking canton of Vaud.

Capital and largest city of the Swiss french speaking canton of Vaud.

Logo of the city of Lausanne
Saint-François Square, c. 1840
Aerial view from 250 m by Walter Mittelholzer (1919)
The agglomeration of Lausanne, Lake Geneva and the Alps.
The Charles-Bessières bridge with Lausanne Metro car. In the background the cathedral of Notre-Dame and the old town.
View from Rue du Grand-Pont
Stairs (escaliers du marché) in the old city.
The Protestant Cathedral of Notre Dame dominates the Lausanne skyline (left: Old Academy, right: Palais de Rumine).
The Lausanne Metro is a rubber tyre metro system
The Lausanne Tram is completely on reserved track, single line, even underground
Public transport network
Aerial view of Lausanne (railway station in the centre and Parc de Milan at the bottom).
The École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (photo) and the University of Lausanne form a large campus near the lake Geneva.
In addition to the Cantonal and University Library of Lausanne, the Palais de Rumine hosts several museums.
The seat of the International Olympic Committee in Lausanne
Jean-Pascal Delamuraz
Johann Ludwig Burckhardt
Auguste Piccard, 1932
Albert Chavannes, 1903
Capucine, 1962
Lady Elizabeth Butler (née Thompson)
Rachel Kolly d'Alba, 2009
Princess Ubol Ratana, 2010
Coco Chanel, 1928
Pierre de Coubertin, 1925
Bertrand Piccard, 2015
Ludovic Magnin, 2006
Spring
Summer
Autumn
Winter
The Casino de Montbenon
Lausanne Cathedral
University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV)
Château Saint-Maire
Swiss Reformed Church of Saint-François
Swiss Reformed Church of Saint-Laurent
Fondation de l'Hermitage
Lausanne railway station
Hôtel Beau-Rivage Palace
Administrative building of the Vaudoise Assurances
Musée de l'Élysée
Olympic Museum and Archives of the International Olympic Committee
Ouchy waterfront
Synagogue
The Sauvabelin Tower
Compagnie Générale de Navigation sur le lac Léman

Lausanne is located 62 km northeast of Geneva, the nearest major city.

League of Nations

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The first worldwide intergovernmental organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace.

The first worldwide intergovernmental organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace.

Anachronous world map showing member states of the League during its 26-year history.
The 1864 Geneva Convention, one of the earliest formulations of international law
The League to Enforce Peace published this full-page promotion in The New York Times on Christmas Day 1918. It resolved that the League "should ensure peace by eliminating causes of dissension, by deciding controversies by peaceable means, and by uniting the potential force of all the members as a standing menace against any nation that seeks to upset the peace of the world".
On his December 1918 trip to Europe, Woodrow Wilson gave speeches that "reaffirmed that the making of peace and the creation of a League of Nations must be accomplished as one single objective".
In 1924, the headquarters of the League was named "Palais Wilson", after Woodrow Wilson, who was credited as the "Founder of the League of Nations"
League of Nations Organisation chart
Palace of Nations, Geneva, the League's headquarters from 1936 until its dissolution in 1946
Child labour in a coal mine, United States, c. 1912
Child labour in Kamerun in 1919
A sample Nansen passport
A map of the world in 1920–45, which shows the League of Nations members during its history
Chinese delegate addresses the League of Nations concerning the Manchurian Crisis in 1932.
Emperor Haile Selassie I going into exile in Bath, England via Jerusalem
The Gap in the Bridge; the sign reads "This League of Nations Bridge was designed by the President of the U.S.A."
Cartoon from Punch magazine, 10 December 1920, satirising the gap left by the US not joining the League.
World map showing member states of the League of Nations (in green and red) on 18 April 1946, when the League of Nations ceased to exist.
League of Nations archives, Geneva.

On 1 November 1920, the headquarters of the League was moved from London to Geneva, where the first General Assembly was held on 15 November 1920.

World Council of Churches logo

World Council of Churches

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Worldwide Christian inter-church organization founded in 1948 to work for the cause of ecumenism.

Worldwide Christian inter-church organization founded in 1948 to work for the cause of ecumenism.

World Council of Churches logo

It has no head office as such, but its administrative centre is at the Ecumenical Centre in Geneva, Switzerland.

United Nations Office at Geneva

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The Allée des Nations, with the flags of the member countries
The headquarters of the World Health Organization
World Intellectual Property Organization headquarters
Tatiana Valovaya, Russia, Director-General since 2019.

The United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG, Office des Nations Unies à Genève) in Geneva, Switzerland, is one of the four major offices of the United Nations where numerous different UN agencies have a joint presence.