Geneva

A view of Geneva by Frances Elizabeth Wynne, 4 August 1858
L'Escalade is what Genevans call the failed surprise attack of 12 December 1602 by troops sent by Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy, to take Geneva. This imaginative image was drawn by Matthias Quad, or the workshop of Frans Hogenberg, around 1603. Invaders are pictured crossing the moat in the center left while reinforcements are entering Plainpalais at the bottom. A column of defenders is in the center, headed toward the Savoyards. Lake Léman is at center top.
Aerial view (1966)
Satellite view of Geneva; Cointrin Airport is centre left.
The Geneva area seen from the Salève in France. The Jura mountains are on the horizon.
Confluence of the Rhône and the Arve
Average temperature and precipitation 1961–1990
Coat of arms of Geneva as part of the pavement in front of the Reformation Wall, 2013
The Flowered Clock at the Quai du Général-Guisan (English Garden), during the 2012 Geneva Festival
Rue Pierre-Fatio in Geneva
Apartment buildings in the Quartier des Grottes
Geneva, with Lake Geneva in the background
Reformation Wall in Geneva; from left to right: William Farel, John Calvin, Theodore Beza, and John Knox
Fireworks at the Fêtes de Genève, 2012
Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
The University of Geneva.
Geneva railway station
TCMC (Tramway Cornavin – Meyrin – CERN)
Geneva Sécheron railway station
TOSA Bus at PALEXPO Flash bus stops
The World Intellectual Property Organization.
The assembly hall of the Palace of Nations.
Gustave Ador
Christiane Brunner
John Calvin, c. 1550
Isaac Casaubon
Michel Decastel, 2012
Jean Henri Dunant, 1901
Kat Graham, 2017
Francois Huber
Paul Lachenal, 1939
Lenin in Switzerland, 1916
Amelie Mauresmo, 2014
Liliane Maury Pasquier, 2007
Pierre Prévost
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Ferdinand de Saussure
Michael Schade, 2012
Michel Simon, 1964
Johann Vogel, 2006
Voltaire
St. Pierre Cathedral
Collège Calvin
International Committee of the Red Cross (CICR)
Conservatory and Botanical Garden of the City of Geneva
Notre-Dame Church
Russian Orthodox Church
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
Hôtel de Ville and the Tour Baudet
Institut et Musée Voltaire
Mallet House and Museum international de la Réforme
Tavel House
Brunswick Monument
Musée d'Art et d'Histoire
The Villa La Grange

Second-most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich) and the most populous city of Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland.

- Geneva
A view of Geneva by Frances Elizabeth Wynne, 4 August 1858

313 related topics

Alpha

The Standard Model of particle physics, listing all elementary particles

Particle physics

Branch of physics that studies the nature of the particles that constitute matter and radiation.

Branch of physics that studies the nature of the particles that constitute matter and radiation.

The Standard Model of particle physics, listing all elementary particles
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, USA

CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) (Franco-Swiss border, near Geneva). Its main project is now the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which had its first beam circulation on 10 September 2008, and is now the world's most energetic collider of protons. It also became the most energetic collider of heavy ions after it began colliding lead ions. Earlier facilities include the Large Electron–Positron Collider (LEP), which was stopped on 2 November 2000 and then dismantled to give way for LHC; and the Super Proton Synchrotron, which is being reused as a pre-accelerator for the LHC and for fixed-target experiments.

Portrait by Nicolas de Largillière, c. 1724

Voltaire

French Enlightenment writer, historian, and philosopher famous for his wit, his criticism of Christianity—especially the Roman Catholic Church—and of slavery, as well as his advocacy of freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and separation of church and state.

French Enlightenment writer, historian, and philosopher famous for his wit, his criticism of Christianity—especially the Roman Catholic Church—and of slavery, as well as his advocacy of freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and separation of church and state.

Portrait by Nicolas de Largillière, c. 1724
Voltaire was imprisoned in the Bastille from 16 May 1717 to 15 April 1718 in a windowless cell with ten-foot-thick walls.
Elémens de la philosophie de Neuton, 1738
In the frontispiece to Voltaire's book on Newton's philosophy, Émilie du Châtelet appears as Voltaire's muse, reflecting Newton's heavenly insights down to Voltaire.
Pastel by Maurice Quentin de La Tour, 1735
Die Tafelrunde by Adolph von Menzel: guests of Frederick the Great at Sanssouci, including members of the Prussian Academy of Sciences and Voltaire (third from left)
Voltaire's château at Ferney, France
House in Paris where Voltaire died
Jean-Antoine Houdon, Voltaire, 1778, National Gallery of Art
Voltaire's tomb in the Paris Panthéon
Title page of Voltaire's Candide, 1759
Voltaire at Frederick the Great's Sanssouci, by Pierre Charles Baquoy
Voltaire at 70; engraving from 1843 edition of his Philosophical Dictionary
Life and Works of Confucius, by Prospero Intorcetta, 1687
An illustration of a scene from Candide where the protagonist encounters a slave in French Guiana
Voltaire, by Jean-Antoine Houdon, 1778 (National Gallery of Art)

Voltaire's slow progress toward Paris continued through Mainz, Mannheim, Strasbourg, and Colmar, but in January 1754 Louis XV banned him from Paris, and he turned for Geneva, near which he bought a large estate (Les Délices) in early 1755.

Portrait of Theodore Beza at age 58, 1577

Theodore Beza

French Calvinist Protestant theologian, reformer and scholar who played an important role in the Protestant Reformation.

French Calvinist Protestant theologian, reformer and scholar who played an important role in the Protestant Reformation.

Portrait of Theodore Beza at age 58, 1577
Beza at age 24, 16th-century portrait
Portrait of Theodore Beza, by English School, 17th century
The Reformation Wall in Geneva. From left: William Farel, John Calvin, Beza, and John Knox
Woodcut of Theodore Beza
Théodore De Beza by an unknown artist, inscribed in 1605

He was a disciple of John Calvin and lived most of his life in Geneva.

Territory of the Allobroges during the Roman period (dark green).

Allobroges

The Allobroges (Gaulish: *Allobrogis, 'foreigner, exiled'; ) were a Gallic people dwelling in a large territory between the Rhône river and the Alps mountains during the Iron Age and the Roman period.

The Allobroges (Gaulish: *Allobrogis, 'foreigner, exiled'; ) were a Gallic people dwelling in a large territory between the Rhône river and the Alps mountains during the Iron Age and the Roman period.

Territory of the Allobroges during the Roman period (dark green).
Roman temple in Vienna.
Hannibal crossing the Alps into Italy.
Allobrogian denarius from the 1st century BC.

By the mid-1st century BC, they also possessed a piece of land north of the Rhône river, between modern Lyon and Geneva, whose later status remains uncertain.

The Chamonix Valley seen from La Flégère with the Mont Blanc in the background

Chamonix

Commune in the Haute-Savoie department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region of southeastern France.

Commune in the Haute-Savoie department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region of southeastern France.

The Chamonix Valley seen from La Flégère with the Mont Blanc in the background
Horace-Benedict de Saussure, with Jacques Balmat (left) who points towards the summit of Mont Blanc, Monument at Chamonix.
Chamonix Valley: crossing the glacier on foot (between 1902 and 1904)
Front and façade of the Chamonix - Mont-Blanc railway station.
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In 1530, the inhabitants obtained from the Count of the Genevois the privilege of holding two fairs a year, while the valley was often visited by the civil officials and by the bishops of Geneva (first recorded visit in 1411, while St. Francis de Sales came there in 1606).

A view of Lake Geneva from Évian-les-Bains

Évian-les-Bains

Commune in the northern part of the Haute-Savoie department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region, Southeastern France.

Commune in the northern part of the Haute-Savoie department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region, Southeastern France.

A view of Lake Geneva from Évian-les-Bains
Postcard of Évian, 1907
The Cachat spring
Entrance of the Lumières brothers' villa
Lakeside view of Évian
CGN paddle steamer Montreux leaving Évian-les-Bains in July 2002.

Évian is served by a bus network, as well as a train station with regular trains to Geneva, Annemasse, and Bellegarde, as well as less frequent services to Paris and Lyon.

Portrait of Horace Bénédict de Saussure (after the picture by Juel, in the Library at Geneva)

Horace Bénédict de Saussure

Genevan geologist, meteorologist, physicist, mountaineer and Alpine explorer, often called the founder of alpinism and modern meteorology, and considered to be the first person to build a successful solar oven.

Genevan geologist, meteorologist, physicist, mountaineer and Alpine explorer, often called the founder of alpinism and modern meteorology, and considered to be the first person to build a successful solar oven.

Portrait of Horace Bénédict de Saussure (after the picture by Juel, in the Library at Geneva)
Christian von Mechel, Descent from Mont-Blanc in 1787 by H.B. de Saussure, copper engraving; collection of Teylers Museum, Haarlem
Print by Charles Simon Pradier after the portrait by Jean-Pierre Saint-Ours
Horace-Bénédict de Saussure monument at Chamonix. Beside him is Jacques Balmat.
Saussurea pygmaea, from the genus named after Saussure
Bust of Saussure, on display on the grounds of the Conservatory and Botanical Garden of the City of Geneva.

Horace Bénédict de Saussure was born 17 February 1740, in Conches, near Geneva (today in Switzerland but then an independent republic), and died in Geneva 22 January 1799.

University of Geneva

Uni Dufour
Uni Mail
Karl Gunnar Myrdal, recipient of the 1974 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences
Werner Arber, recipient of the 1978 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
Edmond H. Fischer, recipient of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
Kofi Annan, recipient of the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize
Didier Queloz, recipient of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics

The University of Geneva (French: Université de Genève) is a public research university located in Geneva, Switzerland.

Arve

River in France (département of Haute-Savoie), and Switzerland (canton of Geneva).

River in France (département of Haute-Savoie), and Switzerland (canton of Geneva).

The Arve (right) meets the Rhône in Geneva
The Arve in Chamonix

Rising in the northern side of the Mont Blanc massif in the Alps, close to the Swiss border, it receives water from the many glaciers of the Chamonix valley (mainly the Mer de Glace) before flowing north-west into the Rhône on the west side of Geneva, where its much higher level of silt brings forth a striking contrast between the two rivers.

Central Europe in 14 AD: Switzerland is divided between the provinces of Raetia et Vindelicia and Gallia Belgica.

Switzerland in the Roman era

Part of the Roman Republic and Empire for a period of about six centuries, beginning with the step-by-step conquest of the area by Roman armies from the 2nd century BC and ending with the Fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD.

Part of the Roman Republic and Empire for a period of about six centuries, beginning with the step-by-step conquest of the area by Roman armies from the 2nd century BC and ending with the Fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD.

Central Europe in 14 AD: Switzerland is divided between the provinces of Raetia et Vindelicia and Gallia Belgica.
Political borders and settlements in the area of Switzerland, 90 to 284 AD
The arena of Aventicum
The theatre of Augusta Raurica
Statue of Hercules in Augusta Raurica
Remains of the colony of Nyon overlooking Lake Geneva
Roman Irgenhausen Castrum near Irgenhausen
The post-Roman division of Switzerland between the Burgundians and the Alamanni persists in the distribution of languages in Switzerland

This area had been dominated by the La Tène culture since the 5th century BC, settled by a mostly Celtic population (Gauls), of which the Helvetii were the most numerous, but which also included the Rauraci in north-west Switzerland centered on Basel, and the Allobroges around Geneva.