Geneva Bible

Breeches BibleGenevaGenevan translation1599 Geneva Study BibleBreeches" BibleGeneva EditionGeneva Study BibleGenevan BibleNew Geneva Study BibleRevised Geneva Translation
The Geneva Bible is one of the most historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James Version by 51 years.wikipedia
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Anthony Gilby

Gilby
Among these scholars was William Whittingham, who supervised the translation now known as the Geneva Bible, in collaboration with Myles Coverdale, Christopher Goodman, Anthony Gilby, Thomas Sampson, and William Cole; several of this group later became prominent figures in the Vestments controversy.
Anthony Gilby (c.1510–1585) was an English clergyman, known as a radical Puritan and translator of the Geneva Bible, the first English Bible available to the general public.

The Souldiers Pocket Bible

Cromwell's Soldiers' Pocket BibleCromwell's ''Soldiers' Pocket Bible
The Geneva Bible was used by many English Dissenters, and it was still respected by Oliver Cromwell's soldiers at the time of the English Civil War, in the booklet "Cromwell's Soldiers' Pocket Bible".
The Souldiers Pocket Bible had just 16 pages that contained some 150 verse quotations from the Geneva Bible, all related to war.

Christopher Goodman

ChristopherGoodman
Among these scholars was William Whittingham, who supervised the translation now known as the Geneva Bible, in collaboration with Myles Coverdale, Christopher Goodman, Anthony Gilby, Thomas Sampson, and William Cole; several of this group later became prominent figures in the Vestments controversy.
He was the author of a work on limits to obedience to rulers, and a contributor to the Geneva Bible.

Thomas Sampson

Among these scholars was William Whittingham, who supervised the translation now known as the Geneva Bible, in collaboration with Myles Coverdale, Christopher Goodman, Anthony Gilby, Thomas Sampson, and William Cole; several of this group later became prominent figures in the Vestments controversy.
A Marian exile, he was one of the Geneva Bible translators.

Vestments controversy

controversyvestiarian controversyvestments
Among these scholars was William Whittingham, who supervised the translation now known as the Geneva Bible, in collaboration with Myles Coverdale, Christopher Goodman, Anthony Gilby, Thomas Sampson, and William Cole; several of this group later became prominent figures in the Vestments controversy.
They were echoed elsewhere, such as the famous glosses of the Geneva Bible.

Bishops' Bible

Bishop's BibleBishops BibleEnglish Bishops
The Geneva Bible had also motivated the earlier production of the Bishops' Bible under Elizabeth I, for the same reason, and the later Rheims-Douai edition by the Catholic community.
The Bishop's Bible succeeded the Great Bible of 1539, the first authorized bible in English, and the Geneva Bible of 1557–1560.

Laurence Tomson

Laurence ThompsonLawrence Tompson
Some editions from 1576 onwards included Laurence Tomson's revisions of the New Testament.
Tomson revised both the text and the annotations of the New Testament of the Geneva Bible.

Douay–Rheims Bible

Douay-Rheims BibleDouay-RheimsDouay Bible
The Geneva Bible had also motivated the earlier production of the Bishops' Bible under Elizabeth I, for the same reason, and the later Rheims-Douai edition by the Catholic community.
Surprisingly these first New Testament and Old Testament editions followed the Geneva Bible not only in their quarto format but also in the use of Roman type.

Great Bible

BibleBible in Englishchained bible
Because the language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous, most readers strongly preferred this version to the Great Bible.

King James Version

King James BibleKJVKing James Version of the Bible
The Geneva Bible is one of the most historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James Version by 51 years.
In Geneva, Switzerland the first generation of Protestant Reformers had produced the Geneva Bible of 1560 from the original Hebrew and Greek scriptures, which was influential in the writing of the Authorized King James Version.

Myles Coverdale

Miles CoverdaleCoverdaleCoverdale, Miles
Among these scholars was William Whittingham, who supervised the translation now known as the Geneva Bible, in collaboration with Myles Coverdale, Christopher Goodman, Anthony Gilby, Thomas Sampson, and William Cole; several of this group later became prominent figures in the Vestments controversy. The English rendering was substantially based on the earlier translations by William Tyndale and Myles Coverdale (the Genevan Bible relies significantly upon Tyndale).
He was also part of the group of "Geneva Exiles" who produced the Geneva Bible – the edition preferred, some ninety-five years later, by Oliver Cromwell's army and his parliamentarians.

William Tyndale

TyndaleWilliam TindaleTindal
The English rendering was substantially based on the earlier translations by William Tyndale and Myles Coverdale (the Genevan Bible relies significantly upon Tyndale).
The translators of the Revised Standard Version in the 1940s noted that Tyndale's translation, including the 1537 Matthew Bible, inspired the translations that followed: The Great Bible of 1539; the Geneva Bible of 1560; the Bishops' Bible of 1568; the Douay-Rheims Bible of 1582–1609; and the King James Version of 1611, of which the RSV translators noted: "It [the KJV] kept felicitous phrases and apt expressions, from whatever source, which had stood the test of public usage. It owed most, especially in the New Testament, to Tyndale".

Matthew Bible

Matthew's Biblefirst complete authorised editionfirst printed English Bible
Coverdale Bible, Matthew Bible).
A. S. Herbert, Bible cataloguer, says of the Matthew Bible, "this version, which welds together the best work of Tyndale and Coverdale, is generally considered to be the real primary version of our English Bible", upon which later editions were based, including the Geneva Bible and King James Version.

Editio Regia

Bible translations

Bible translationBible translatortranslation
The Geneva Bible is one of the most historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James Version by 51 years.

Bible

biblicalThe BibleChristian Bible
The Geneva Bible is one of the most historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James Version by 51 years.

William Shakespeare

ShakespeareShakespeareanShakespearian
It was the primary Bible of 16th-century English Protestantism and was used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan, author of The Pilgrim's Progress (1678).

Oliver Cromwell

CromwellCromwellianOliver
The Geneva Bible was used by many English Dissenters, and it was still respected by Oliver Cromwell's soldiers at the time of the English Civil War, in the booklet "Cromwell's Soldiers' Pocket Bible". It was the primary Bible of 16th-century English Protestantism and was used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan, author of The Pilgrim's Progress (1678).

John Knox

KnoxKnox’sMartha Knox
It was the primary Bible of 16th-century English Protestantism and was used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan, author of The Pilgrim's Progress (1678).

John Donne

DonneJonathan DunneAnn More
It was the primary Bible of 16th-century English Protestantism and was used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan, author of The Pilgrim's Progress (1678).

John Bunyan

BunyanBunyan, JohnGrace Abounding
It was the primary Bible of 16th-century English Protestantism and was used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan, author of The Pilgrim's Progress (1678).