Genographic Project

The Genographic ProjectGeno 2.0 Next GenerationGenographicNational Geographic Geno 2.0
The Genographic Project, launched on April 13, 2005 by the National Geographic Society, was a genetic anthropological study (sales discontinued May 31, 2019) that aims to map historical human migration patterns by collecting and analyzing DNA samples.wikipedia
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Spencer Wells

Created and led by project director Spencer Wells in 2005, The Genographic Project is a privately funded, not-for-profit collaboration between the National Geographic Society and the Waitt Foundation.
Wells led The Genographic Project from 2005 to 2015, as an Explorer-in-Residence at the National Geographic Society.

Family Tree DNA

FamilyTreeDNAFTDNAFamilyTree DNA
The design of the new chip was a collaborative effort between Wells of National Geographic, Eran Elhaik of Johns Hopkins, Family Tree DNA, and Illumina.
FamilyTreeDNA staff were instrumental in developing the Geno 2.0 Next Generation product for the second phase of the Genographic Project.

Vietnamese people

VietnameseKinhViet
The reference population for Vietnamese (Kinh) used in the Geno 2.0 Next Generation is 83% Southeast Asia & Oceania, 12% Eastern Asia and 3% Southern Asia.

National Geographic Society

National GeographicNational Geographic NewsNational Geographic Films
Created and led by project director Spencer Wells in 2005, The Genographic Project is a privately funded, not-for-profit collaboration between the National Geographic Society and the Waitt Foundation. The Genographic Project, launched on April 13, 2005 by the National Geographic Society, was a genetic anthropological study (sales discontinued May 31, 2019) that aims to map historical human migration patterns by collecting and analyzing DNA samples.

Helix (genomics company)

Helix
In 2016, the project began utilizing cutting-edge Helix DNA sequencing for Geno 2.0 Next Generation, the current phase of the Genographic Project.
In 2016, Helix partnered with the National Geographic Society to sequence DNA for the Genographic Project.

Citizen science

citizen scientistscitizen scientistcitizen-science
Since 2005 Genographic has used volunteers (in fieldwork and providing DNA samples) and citizen science projects. Since 2005, the Genographic Project has used the latest genetic technology to expand our knowledge of the human story, and its pioneering use of DNA testing to engage and involve the public in the research effort has helped to create a new breed of "citizen scientist." Geno 2.0 expands the scope for citizen science, harnessing the power of the crowd to discover new details of human population history.
Since 2005, the Genographic Project has used the latest genetic technology to expand our knowledge of the human story, and its pioneering use of DNA testing to engage and involve the public in the research effort has helped to create a new breed of "citizen scientist".

Lebanese people

LebaneseLebanese descentLebanon
It was during a broader survey of Middle Eastern populations conducted for the Genographic Project of the National Geographic Society that the findings were stumbled upon.

International Society of Genetic Genealogy

ISOGGThe International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG)
Such outreach for public participation in research has been encouraged by organizations such as International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG), which is seeking to promote benefits from scientific research.
The broader ISOGG membership participated in the Genographic Project, a genetic anthropology study that used crowdsourcing to facilitate new discoveries about human genetic history, and other genetic databases where broader and larger databases aid the identification of participants' ancestral origins.

Crowdsourcing

crowdsourcedcrowd-sourcedcrowdsource
Since 2005, the Genographic Project has used the latest genetic technology to expand our knowledge of the human story, and its pioneering use of DNA testing to engage and involve the public in the research effort has helped to create a new breed of "citizen scientist." Geno 2.0 expands the scope for citizen science, harnessing the power of the crowd to discover new details of human population history.
Spencer Wells, director of the Genographic Project blurb:

Indigenous Peoples Council on Biocolonialism

Indigenous People's Council
Shortly after the announcement of the project in April 2005, the Indigenous Peoples Council on Biocolonialism (IPCB), based in Nevada, released a statement criticizing the project: spokespersons noted its connections to controversial issues (such as concern among some tribes that the results of genetic human migration studies might indicate that Native Americans are not indigenous to North America) raised by the Human Genome Diversity Project, which had government overview, unlike the privately-funded Genographic Project.
In 2005 and 2006, the group protested against the National Geographic's Genographic Project (cf.

Genealogical DNA test

DNA testautosomal DNADNA testing
This includes supporting, organization and dissemination of personal DNA (genetic) testing.

Human Genome Diversity Project

HGDPHDGPhuman genetic diversity
Shortly after the announcement of the project in April 2005, the Indigenous Peoples Council on Biocolonialism (IPCB), based in Nevada, released a statement criticizing the project: spokespersons noted its connections to controversial issues (such as concern among some tribes that the results of genetic human migration studies might indicate that Native Americans are not indigenous to North America) raised by the Human Genome Diversity Project, which had government overview, unlike the privately-funded Genographic Project.
A number of the principal collaborators in the HGDP have been involved in the privately funded Genographic Project launched in April 2005 with similar aims.

Paleo-Indians

Paleo-IndianPaleoindianPaleoindians
"What the scientists are trying to prove is that we're the same as the Pilgrims except we came over several thousand years before", said Maurice Foxx, chairman of the Massachusetts Commission on Indian Affairs and a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag.

Molecular anthropology

Genetic anthropologyanthropological geneticsgenetic anthropological
The Genographic Project, launched on April 13, 2005 by the National Geographic Society, was a genetic anthropological study (sales discontinued May 31, 2019) that aims to map historical human migration patterns by collecting and analyzing DNA samples.

DNA

deoxyribonucleic aciddouble-stranded DNAdsDNA
The Genographic Project, launched on April 13, 2005 by the National Geographic Society, was a genetic anthropological study (sales discontinued May 31, 2019) that aims to map historical human migration patterns by collecting and analyzing DNA samples.

Indigenous peoples

indigenousindigenous peopleaboriginal
Field researchers at eleven regional centers around the world first began by collecting DNA samples from indigenous populations.

Single-nucleotide polymorphism

single nucleotide polymorphismSNPSNPs
GenoChip is specifically designed for anthropological testing and includes SNPs from autosomal DNA, X-chromosome DNA, Y-chromosome DNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA).

Autosome

autosomalautosomal DNAautosomes
GenoChip is specifically designed for anthropological testing and includes SNPs from autosomal DNA, X-chromosome DNA, Y-chromosome DNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA).

X chromosome

XX-chromosomechromosome X
GenoChip is specifically designed for anthropological testing and includes SNPs from autosomal DNA, X-chromosome DNA, Y-chromosome DNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA).

Mitochondrial DNA

mtDNAmitochondrialmitochondrial genome
GenoChip is specifically designed for anthropological testing and includes SNPs from autosomal DNA, X-chromosome DNA, Y-chromosome DNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA).

Johns Hopkins University

Johns HopkinsThe Johns Hopkins UniversityJohns Hopkins Medical Institutions
The design of the new chip was a collaborative effort between Wells of National Geographic, Eran Elhaik of Johns Hopkins, Family Tree DNA, and Illumina.

Illumina, Inc.

IlluminaSolexaIllumina (company)
The design of the new chip was a collaborative effort between Wells of National Geographic, Eran Elhaik of Johns Hopkins, Family Tree DNA, and Illumina.