Genus

generageneric namegenericgenus nameLucinageneric epithetnamed Lucinanamescientific name
A genus (plural genera) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, as well as viruses, in biology.wikipedia
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Taxonomy (biology)

taxonomictaxonomytaxonomist
A genus (plural genera) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, as well as viruses, in biology.
The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus, and species.

Species

specificspecific epithetspecific name
In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. It plays a fundamental role in binomial nomenclature, the system of naming organisms, where it is combined with the scientific name of a species: see Specific name (botany) and Specific name (zoology).
The first part of a binomial is the genus to which the species belongs.

Neontology

extantlivingextant species
A genus (plural genera) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, as well as viruses, in biology.

Family (biology)

familyfamiliessubfamily
In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family.
Family (familia, plural familiae) is one of the eight major hierarchical taxonomic ranks in Linnaean taxonomy; it is classified between order and genus.

Felidae

wild catfelidfeline
Panthera is a genus within the family Felidae.
Pantherinae includes five Panthera and two Neofelis species, while Felinae includes the other 34 species in ten genera.

Fossil

fossilsfossil recordfossilized
A genus (plural genera) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, as well as viruses, in biology.
One genus of stromatolite very common in the geologic record is Collenia.

Binomial nomenclature

scientific namebinomial namebinomial authority
In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus. It plays a fundamental role in binomial nomenclature, the system of naming organisms, where it is combined with the scientific name of a species: see Specific name (botany) and Specific name (zoology). The rules for the scientific names of organisms are laid down in the Nomenclature Codes, which allow each species a single unique name that, for "animals" (including protists), "plants" (also including algae and fungi) and prokaryotes (Bacteria and Archaea), is Latin and binomial in form; this contrasts with common or vernacular names, which are non-standardized, can be non-unique, and typically also vary by country and language of usage.
The first part of the name – the generic name – identifies the genus to which the species belongs, while the second part – the specific name or specific epithet – identifies the species within the genus.

Joseph Pitton de Tournefort

TournefortTourn.Joseph de Tournefort
Linnaeus popularized its use in his 1753 Species Plantarum, but the French botanist Joseph Pitton de Tournefort (1656–1708) is considered "the founder of the modern concept of genera".
Joseph Pitton de Tournefort (5 June 1656 – 28 December 1708) was a French botanist, notable as the first to make a clear definition of the concept of genus for plants.

Virus classification

viral speciessubviral agentBaltimore classification
A genus (plural genera) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, as well as viruses, in biology.

Species Plantarum

1753Linnaeus (1753)Sp. Pl.
Linnaeus popularized its use in his 1753 Species Plantarum, but the French botanist Joseph Pitton de Tournefort (1656–1708) is considered "the founder of the modern concept of genera".
Species Plantarum (Latin for "The Species of Plants") is a book by Carl Linnaeus, originally published in 1753, which lists every species of plant known at the time, classified into genera.

Wolf

wolvesgray wolfgrey wolf
For example, the gray wolf's scientific name is Canis lupus, with Canis (Lat.
The wolf is the most specialized member of the genus Canis for cooperative big game hunting, as demonstrated by its physical adaptations to tackling large prey, its more social nature, and its highly advanced expressive behaviour.

Canis

caninecaninescani-
For example, the gray wolf's scientific name is Canis lupus, with Canis (Lat.
Canis is a genus of the Canidae containing multiple extant species, such as wolves, coyotes and jackals.

Specific name (zoology)

specific namespecific epithetspecies name
It plays a fundamental role in binomial nomenclature, the system of naming organisms, where it is combined with the scientific name of a species: see Specific name (botany) and Specific name (zoology).
The first part of the name of a species is the name of the genus or the generic name.

Hibiscus

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A botanical example would be Hibiscus arnottianus, a particular species of the genus Hibiscus native to Hawaii.
The generic name is derived from the Greek name ἰβίσκος (hibiskos) which Pedanius Dioscorides gave to Althaea officinalis (c.

Carl Linnaeus

LinnaeusL.Carl von Linné
Linnaeus popularized its use in his 1753 Species Plantarum, but the French botanist Joseph Pitton de Tournefort (1656–1708) is considered "the founder of the modern concept of genera".
The next year, he published Genera Plantarum, in which he described 935 genera of plants, and shortly thereafter he supplemented it with Corollarium Generum Plantarum, with another sixty (sexaginta) genera.

Protist

ProtistaprotistsProtoctista
The rules for the scientific names of organisms are laid down in the Nomenclature Codes, which allow each species a single unique name that, for "animals" (including protists), "plants" (also including algae and fungi) and prokaryotes (Bacteria and Archaea), is Latin and binomial in form; this contrasts with common or vernacular names, which are non-standardized, can be non-unique, and typically also vary by country and language of usage.
For instance, the water molds are now considered to be closely related to photosynthetic organisms such as Brown algae and Diatoms, the slime molds are grouped mainly under Amoebozoa, and the Amoebozoa itself includes only a subset of "Amoeba" group, and significant number of erstwhile "Amoeboid" genera are distributed among Rhizarians and other Phyla.

Biology

biologicalBiological Sciencesbiologist
A genus (plural genera) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, as well as viruses, in biology.
Domain; Kingdom; Phylum; Class; Order; Family; Genus; Species.

Botanical name

specific epithetepithetspecific name
It plays a fundamental role in binomial nomenclature, the system of naming organisms, where it is combined with the scientific name of a species: see Specific name (botany) and Specific name (zoology).
Depending on rank, botanical names may be in one part (genus and above), two parts (various situations below the rank of genus) or three parts (below the rank of species).

Botany

botanistbotanicalplant biology
The specific name is written in lower-case and may be followed by subspecies names in zoology or a variety of infraspecific names in botany.
This established a standardised binomial or two-part naming scheme where the first name represented the genus and the second identified the species within the genus.

International Code of Zoological Nomenclature

ICZNzoological nomenclatureICZN Code
Available names are those published in accordance with the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature and not otherwise suppressed by subsequent decisions of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN); the earliest such name for any taxon (for example, a genus) should then be selected as the "valid" (i.e., current or accepted) name for the taxon in question.
The rules in the code determine what names are valid for any taxon in the family group, genus group, and species group.

Type species

typesingle speciestype specimen
In zoology, this is the type species and the generic name is permanently associated with the type specimen of its type species.
In zoological nomenclature, a type species (species typica) is the species name with which the name of a genus or subgenus is considered to be permanently taxonomically associated, i.e., the species that contains the biological type specimen(s).

Bacteria

bacteriumbacterialEubacteria
The rules for the scientific names of organisms are laid down in the Nomenclature Codes, which allow each species a single unique name that, for "animals" (including protists), "plants" (also including algae and fungi) and prokaryotes (Bacteria and Archaea), is Latin and binomial in form; this contrasts with common or vernacular names, which are non-standardized, can be non-unique, and typically also vary by country and language of usage.
Certain genera of gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus, Clostridium, Sporohalobacter, Anaerobacter, and Heliobacterium, can form highly resistant, dormant structures called endospores.

Pecten (bivalve)

Pecten PectenPecten sp.
For example, the World Register of Marine Species presently lists 8 genus-level synonyms for the sperm whale genus Physeter Linnaeus, 1758, and 13 for the bivalve genus Pecten O.F. Müller, 1776.
Pecten is a genus of large scallops or saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs in the family Pectinidae, the scallops.

Platypus

Ornithorhynchus anatinusduck-billed platypusOrnithorhynchus
For example, the platypus belongs to the genus Ornithorhynchus although George Shaw named it Platypus in 1799 (these two names are thus synonyms).
The platypus is the sole living representative of its family (Ornithorhynchidae) and genus (Ornithorhynchus), though a number of related species appear in the fossil record.

Subspecies

nominate subspeciesnominotypical subspeciesnominate
The specific name is written in lower-case and may be followed by subspecies names in zoology or a variety of infraspecific names in botany.
The scientific name of a species is a binomial or binomen, and comprises two Latin words, the first denoting the genus and the second denoting the species.