A report on Geomorphology and Landform

Badlands incised into shale at the foot of the North Caineville Plateau, Utah, within the pass carved by the Fremont River and known as the Blue Gate. GK Gilbert studied the landscapes of this area in great detail, forming the observational foundation for many of his studies on geomorphology.
This conical hill in Salar de Arizaro, Salta, Argentina called Cono de Arita constitutes a landform.
Surface of the Earth, showing higher elevations in red.
Karst towers landforms along Lijiang River, Guilin, China
Waves and water chemistry lead to structural failure in exposed rocks
"Cono de Arita" at the dry lake Salar de Arizaro on the Atacama Plateau, in northwestern Argentina. The cone itself is a volcanic edifice, representing complex interaction of intrusive igneous rocks with the surrounding salt.
Lake "Veľké Hincovo pleso" in High Tatras, Slovakia. The lake occupies an "overdeepening" carved by flowing ice that once occupied this glacial valley.
Part of the Great Escarpment in the Drakensberg, southern Africa. This landscape, with its high altitude plateau being incised into by the steep slopes of the escarpment, was cited by Davis as a classic example of his cycle of erosion.
Gorge cut by the Indus river into bedrock, Nanga Parbat region, Pakistan. This is the deepest river canyon in the world. Nanga Parbat itself, the world's 9th highest mountain, is seen in the background.
Wind-eroded alcove near Moab, Utah
Beaver dams, as this one in Tierra del Fuego, constitute a specific form of zoogeomorphology, a type of biogeomorphology.
Seif and barchan dunes in the Hellespontus region on the surface of Mars. Dunes are mobile landforms created by the transport of large volumes of sand by wind.
Features of a glacial landscape
Talus cones on the north shore of Isfjorden, Svalbard, Norway. Talus cones are accumulations of coarse hillslope debris at the foot of the slopes producing the material.
The Ferguson Slide is an active landslide in the Merced River canyon on California State Highway 140, a primary access road to Yosemite National Park.

Geomorphologists seek to understand why landscapes look the way they do, to understand landform and terrain history and dynamics and to predict changes through a combination of field observations, physical experiments and numerical modeling.

- Geomorphology

The scientific study of landforms is known as geomorphology.

- Landform
Badlands incised into shale at the foot of the North Caineville Plateau, Utah, within the pass carved by the Fremont River and known as the Blue Gate. GK Gilbert studied the landscapes of this area in great detail, forming the observational foundation for many of his studies on geomorphology.

2 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Autumn landscape in Rybiniszki, Latvia, watercolor by Stanisław Masłowski, 1902 (National Museum in Warsaw, Poland)

Landscape

0 links

Autumn landscape in Rybiniszki, Latvia, watercolor by Stanisław Masłowski, 1902 (National Museum in Warsaw, Poland)
A typical Dutch landscape in South Holland
Kukle, Czech Republic
Medieval Ridge and Furrow above Wood Stanway, Gloucestershire, England.
The Batad rice terraces, The Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras, the first site to be included in the UNESCO World Heritage List cultural landscape category in 1995.
Stourhead garden, Wiltshire, England
Jichang Garden in Wuxi (1506–1521)
Central Park, New York City, US, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted.
The Djabugay language group's mythical being, Damarri, transformed into a mountain range, is seen lying on his back above the Barron River Gorge, looking upwards to the skies, within north-east Australia's wet tropical forested landscape
The Vale of Blackmore, the main setting for Thomas Hardy's novel Tess of the d'Urbervilles. Hambledon Hill towards Stourton Tower
The Tetons and the Snake River (1942) photograph by Ansel Adams
Salomon van Ruisdael, "View of Deventer" (1657).
Thomas Cole "The Course of Empire The Arcadian or Pastoral State", US, 1836.
Laurent Guétal, Lac de l'Eychauda, France, 1886, Museum of Grenoble.
Landscape with scene from the Odyssey, Rome, c. 60-40 BC.
:Raphael, Madonna in the Meadow (1505 - 1506).
Spring in Kiangnan (1547) by Wen Cheng-Ming(1470-1559) (lower half detail).
Claude Lorrain, Landscape with Apollo Guarding the Herds of Admetus and Mercury stealing them (1645).
Albert Bierstadt, The Matterhorn (circa 1867).
Vincent van Gogh, Wheat Fields at Auvers Under Clouded Sky (1890).
Pablo Picasso, 1908, Paysage aux deux figures (Landscape with Two Figures)
Paul Nash, Wire (1918).
Carl Brandt: "Åreskutan, landscape",1921 (Sweden)
Emily Carr, Odds and Ends, 1939 (British Columbia, Canada)

A landscape is the visible features of an area of land, its landforms, and how they integrate with natural or man-made features, often considered in terms of their aesthetic appeal.

Geomorphology is the scientific study of the origin and evolution of topographic and bathymetric features created by physical or chemical processes operating at or near Earth's surface.

Hill upon which the village of Saint-Paul-de-Vence is built, in Southern France

Hill

0 links

Hill upon which the village of Saint-Paul-de-Vence is built, in Southern France
Puijo Hill in Kuopio, Finland
Chocolate Hills of the Philippines
Hills in Tuscany, Italy
Rolling Hills Paranal
Hills of the Judean Desert
Clouds over hills in Steptoe, Washington
Hill in Mysore
The Battle of Bunker Hill
Hillwalkers on Beinn Dearg, Scotland
An example of a golf course in England that has hills
Cerro Paranal in Chile is a privileged place for astronomical observation,<ref>{{cite web|title=The Very Large Telescope|url=http://www.eso.org/public/teles-instr/vlt.html|work=Telescopes and Instruments|publisher=ESO|access-date=10 August 2011}}</ref> and home of ESO's telescopes.
Hill in Israel
A coffee plantation on a conical hill near Orosí, Costa Rica.
An arrow pointing towards the top of the Malminkartanonhuippu hill in Helsinki, Finland.
An ant mound, or ant-hill, a mound sometimes casually referred to as a hill
Maungakiekie / One Tree Hill is a prominent feature of the skyline of Auckland, New Zealand.

A hill is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain.

Hills may form through geomorphic phenomena: faulting, erosion of larger landforms such as mountains and movement and deposition of sediment by glaciers (notably moraines and drumlins or by erosion exposing solid rock which then weathers down into a hill).