George Benson

Benson, GeorgeCompliments of a FriendG''eorge BensonThe George Benson Quartet
George Benson (born March 22, 1943) is an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter.wikipedia
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Jack McDuff

Brother Jack McDuffBrother" Jack McDuff
A former child prodigy, Benson first came to prominence in the 1960s, playing soul jazz with Jack McDuff and others.
He is also credited with giving guitarist George Benson his first break.

List of stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Hollywood Walk of FameMotion Picture Starstar
Benson has been honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Breezin'

Breezin’
His album Breezin' was certified triple-platinum, hitting no. 1 on the Billboard album chart in 1976. With the 1976 release Breezin', Benson sang a lead vocal on the track "This Masquerade" (notable also for the lush, romantic piano intro and solo by Jorge Dalto), which became a huge pop hit and won a Grammy Award for Record of the Year.
Breezin' is a studio album by jazz/soul guitarist George Benson.

Lonnie Smith (jazz musician)

Lonnie SmithDr. Lonnie SmithDoctor Lonnie Smith
Benson's next recording was It's Uptown with the George Benson Quartet, including Lonnie Smith on organ and Ronnie Cuber on baritone saxophone.
Lonnie Smith (born July 3, 1942), styled Dr. Lonnie Smith, is an American jazz Hammond B3 organist who was a member of the George Benson quartet in the 1960s.

CTI Records

CTIKuduKudu Records
Benson then signed with Creed Taylor's jazz label CTI Records, where he recorded several albums, with jazz heavyweights guesting, to some success, mainly in the jazz field.
Its first album was A Day in the Life by guitarist Wes Montgomery in 1967 Its roster included George Benson, Ron Carter, Eumir Deodato, Astrud Gilberto, Freddie Hubbard, Bob James, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Hubert Laws, Stanley Turrentine, and Walter Wanderley,

The Other Side of Abbey Road

Benson also did a version of The Beatles's 1969 album Abbey Road called The Other Side of Abbey Road, also released in 1969, and a version of "White Rabbit", originally written and recorded by San Francisco rock group Great Society, and made famous by Jefferson Airplane.
The Other Side of Abbey Road is a 1970 studio album by American guitarist George Benson of songs from The Beatles' 1969 album Abbey Road.

Ronnie Cuber

Cuber, RonnieRon CuberRonald E. Cuber
Benson's next recording was It's Uptown with the George Benson Quartet, including Lonnie Smith on organ and Ronnie Cuber on baritone saxophone.
Then from 1966 to 1967, Cuber worked with George Benson.

Schenley High School

SchenleyPittsburgh (PA) SchenleySchenley (PA)
Benson attended and graduated from Schenley High School.
George Benson - Jazz/R&B musician and recording artist

Jorge Dalto

Dalto, Jorge
With the 1976 release Breezin', Benson sang a lead vocal on the track "This Masquerade" (notable also for the lush, romantic piano intro and solo by Jorge Dalto), which became a huge pop hit and won a Grammy Award for Record of the Year.
Jorge Dalto (July 7, 1948 – October 27, 1987) was a pop, jazz and Afro-Cuban music pianist from Argentina, and the former musical director and keyboardist (together with Ronnie Foster) for George Benson, contributing the acoustic piano intro and solo to Benson's 1976 Grammy-winning hit version of Leon Russell's "This Masquerade".

Here Comes the Sun

Here Comes the Sun (Live)Mr. Sun
(He had sung vocals infrequently on albums earlier in his career, notably his rendition of "Here Comes the Sun" on the Other Side of Abbey Road album.) The rest of the album is instrumental, including his rendition of the 1975 Jose Feliciano composition "Affirmation".
Nina Simone, George Benson, Booker T. & the M.G.'s, Peter Tosh and Joe Brown are among the many other artists who have covered the song.

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaPittsburgh, PACity of Pittsburgh
Benson was born and raised in the Hill District in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
His anthem "Black and Yellow" (a tribute to Pittsburgh's official colors) reached number one on Billboard's "Hot 100" for the Week of February 19, 2011 Not since Grammy-winning blues guitarist George Benson has a Pittsburgh artist received such national acclaim.

Stanley Turrentine

Stanely TurrentineStanleyTurrentine
Benson played on numerous sessions for other CTI artists during this time, including Freddie Hubbard and Stanley Turrentine, notably on the latter's acclaimed album Sugar.
He worked with Freddie Hubbard, Milt Jackson, George Benson, Bob James, Richard Tee, Idris Muhammad, Ron Carter, Grant Green and Eric Gale, to name a few.

Freddie Hubbard

Freddie Hubbard QuintetFrederick Dewayne HubbardHubbard
Benson played on numerous sessions for other CTI artists during this time, including Freddie Hubbard and Stanley Turrentine, notably on the latter's acclaimed album Sugar.
Hubbard achieved his greatest popular success in the 1970s with a series of albums for Creed Taylor and his record label CTI Records, overshadowing Stanley Turrentine, Hubert Laws, and George Benson.

Miles in the Sky

Miles Davis employed Benson in the mid-1960s, featuring his guitar on "Paraphernalia" on his 1968 Columbia release, Miles in the Sky before going to Verve Records.
Guitarist George Benson made a guest appearance on the song "Paraphernalia".

This Masquerade

With the 1976 release Breezin', Benson sang a lead vocal on the track "This Masquerade" (notable also for the lush, romantic piano intro and solo by Jorge Dalto), which became a huge pop hit and won a Grammy Award for Record of the Year. During the same year, 1976, the top selling album 'Breezin' was released on the Warner Brothers label featuring the Bobby Womack penned title track and the Leon Russell penned This Masquerade which is now a jazz standard.
Three years later, "This Masquerade" was recorded by American singer and guitarist George Benson, who released it on his 1976 album, Breezin'.

Songs in the Key of Life

Knocks Me Off My FeetIf It's MagicLove's in Need of Love Today
In 1976, Benson toured with soul singer Minnie Riperton, who had been diagnosed with terminal breast cancer earlier that year and, in addition, appeared as a guitarist and backup vocalist on Stevie Wonder's song "Another Star" from Wonder's album Songs in the Key of Life.
Among the people present during the sessions, there were legendary figures of R&B, soul and jazz music – Herbie Hancock played Fender Rhodes on "As", George Benson played electric guitar on "Another Star", and Minnie Riperton and Deniece Williams added backing vocals on "Ordinary Pain".

The Greatest Love of All

Greatest Love of All
He also recorded the original version of "The Greatest Love of All" for the 1977 Muhammad Ali bio-pic, The Greatest, which was later covered by Whitney Houston as "Greatest Love of All".
It was originally recorded in 1977 by George Benson, who made the song a substantial hit, peaking at number two on the US Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart that year, the first R&B chart top-ten hit for Arista Records.

Give Me the Night (George Benson song)

Give Me the NightGimme the LightGimme The Mic
Benson made it into the pop and R&B top ten with the song "Give Me the Night" (written by former Heatwave keyboardist Rod Temperton).
"Give Me the Night" is a song recorded by American jazz musician George Benson, which he released from his 1980 studio album of the same title.

Soul jazz

soul-jazzJazz soulSoul jazz music
A former child prodigy, Benson first came to prominence in the 1960s, playing soul jazz with Jack McDuff and others.
Saxophone and guitar are also important in soul jazz; soul jazz tenors include Stanley Turrentine, Hank Crawford, Gene Ammons, Eddie Harris, Houston Person, and Ramon Morris; guitarists include Grant Green, Melvin Sparks, O'Donel Levy, Phil Upchurch, David T. Walker, and George Benson.

Bobby Womack

BobbyBobby and Shirley WomackB. Womack
During the same year, 1976, the top selling album 'Breezin' was released on the Warner Brothers label featuring the Bobby Womack penned title track and the Leon Russell penned This Masquerade which is now a jazz standard.
In 1969, Womack forged a partnership with Gábor Szabó and with Szabó, penned the instrumental "Breezin'", later a hit for George Benson.

The Greatest (1977 film)

The Greatest1977Muhammad Ali In The Greatest
He also recorded the original version of "The Greatest Love of All" for the 1977 Muhammad Ali bio-pic, The Greatest, which was later covered by Whitney Houston as "Greatest Love of All".
The song "The Greatest Love of All" was written for this film by Michael Masser (music) and Linda Creed, (lyrics) and sung by George Benson; it was later covered by Whitney Houston.

Rod Temperton

R. TempertonRodney TempertonTemperton
Benson made it into the pop and R&B top ten with the song "Give Me the Night" (written by former Heatwave keyboardist Rod Temperton).
He also wrote George Benson's hits "Give Me the Night" and "Love X Love", and Patti Austin and James Ingram's US number one duet "Baby, Come to Me", among many others.

Whitney Houston

WhitneyBrownHouse ProductionsAlways Whitney
He also recorded the original version of "The Greatest Love of All" for the 1977 Muhammad Ali bio-pic, The Greatest, which was later covered by Whitney Houston as "Greatest Love of All".
The final single, "Greatest Love of All", a cover of "The Greatest Love of All", originally recorded by George Benson in 1977, became Houston's biggest hit at the time after peaking No. 1 and remaining there for three weeks on the Hot 100 chart, which made her debut the first album by a woman to yield three No. 1 hits.

White Rabbit (song)

White RabbitWhite Rabbit" (song)
Benson also did a version of The Beatles's 1969 album Abbey Road called The Other Side of Abbey Road, also released in 1969, and a version of "White Rabbit", originally written and recorded by San Francisco rock group Great Society, and made famous by Jefferson Airplane.
Among the more notable examples are guitarist George Benson's jazz version from 1971 (featuring an electric piano solo by Herbie Hancock), and a single released in 1980 by punk/gothic rock band the Damned.

On Broadway (song)

On BroadwayBroadwayOn Broadway" (song)
The live take of "On Broadway", recorded a few months later from the 1978 release Weekend in L.A., also won a Grammy.
George Benson's version of "On Broadway", from his 1978 album Weekend in L.A., hit No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 2 on the soul chart.