George Berkeley

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George Berkeley ( 12 March 1685 – 14 January 1753) – known as Bishop Berkeley (Bishop of Cloyne) – was an Irish philosopher whose primary achievement was the advancement of a theory he called "immaterialism" (later referred to as "subjective idealism" by others).wikipedia
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Berkeley, California

BerkeleyBerkeley, CACity of Berkeley
Berkeley was the namesake of the city of Berkeley, California, which is most famous as the home of the University of California, Berkeley.
It is named after the 18th-century Irish bishop and philosopher George Berkeley.

University of California, Berkeley

UC BerkeleyUniversity of California at BerkeleyBerkeley
Berkeley was the namesake of the city of Berkeley, California, which is most famous as the home of the University of California, Berkeley.
Frederick H. Billings was a trustee of the College of California and suggested that the new site for the college north of Oakland be named in honor of the Anglo-Irish philosopher George Berkeley.

De Motu (Berkeley's essay)

De MotuDe Motu'' (Berkeley's essay)
Berkeley argued against Isaac Newton's doctrine of absolute space, time and motion in De Motu (On Motion), published 1721.
De motu: Sive; de motu principio et natura, et de causa communicationis motuum (On Motion: or The Principle and Nature of Motion and the Cause of the Communication of Motions), or simply De Motu, is an essay written by George Berkeley and published in 1721.

Mind

mentalhuman mindmental content
This theory denies the existence of material substance and instead contends that familiar objects like tables and chairs are only ideas in the minds of perceivers and, as a result, cannot exist without being perceived.
Important philosophers of mind include Plato, Patanjali, Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Searle, Dennett, Fodor, Nagel, and Chalmers.

Space

spatialphysical spacereal space
Berkeley argued against Isaac Newton's doctrine of absolute space, time and motion in De Motu (On Motion), published 1721.
In the 18th century, the philosopher and theologian George Berkeley attempted to refute the "visibility of spatial depth" in his Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision.

Alciphron (book)

Alciphron
In 1732, he published Alciphron, a Christian apologetic against the free-thinkers, and in 1734, he published The Analyst, a critique of the foundations of calculus, which was influential in the development of mathematics.
Alciphron, or The Minute Philosopher is an philosophical dialogue by the 18th-century Irish philosopher George Berkeley wherein Berkeley combated the arguments of free-thinkers such as Mandeville and Shaftesbury against the Christian religion.

Subjective idealism

immaterialismimmaterialistsubjective idealist
George Berkeley ( 12 March 1685 – 14 January 1753) – known as Bishop Berkeley (Bishop of Cloyne) – was an Irish philosopher whose primary achievement was the advancement of a theory he called "immaterialism" (later referred to as "subjective idealism" by others).
Subjective idealism made its mark in Europe in the 18th-century writings of George Berkeley, who argued that the idea of mind-independent reality is incoherent, concluding that the world consists of the minds of humans and of God.

Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous

1713Berkeley's ''Three Dialogues between Hylas and PhilonousThree Dialogues
This foreshadowed his chief philosophical work, A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, in 1710, which, after its poor reception, he rewrote in dialogue form and published under the title Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous in 1713.
Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous, or simply Three Dialogues, is a 1713 book on metaphysics and idealism written by George Berkeley.

Samuel Clarke

ClarkeClarkeandr. Clarke
The theory was largely received with ridicule, while even those such as Samuel Clarke and William Whiston, who did acknowledge his "extraordinary genius," were nevertheless convinced that his first principles were false.
He is considered the major British figure in philosophy between John Locke and George Berkeley.

Tar water

His last major philosophical work, Siris (1744), begins by advocating the medicinal use of tar water and then continues to discuss a wide range of topics, including science, philosophy, and theology.
Both these uses were originally advocated by the philosopher George Berkeley, who lauded it in his tract Siris: A Chain of Philosophical Reflections and Inquiries, Concerning the Virtues of Tar Water.

Kilkenny College

KilkennyKilkenny Grammar Schoolthe town’s college
He was educated at Kilkenny College and attended Trinity College Dublin, where he was elected a Scholar in 1702, earning a bachelor's degree in 1704 and completing a master's degree in 1707.

A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge

Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human KnowledgePrinciples of Human Knowledgeprinciple of knowledge
This foreshadowed his chief philosophical work, A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, in 1710, which, after its poor reception, he rewrote in dialogue form and published under the title Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous in 1713.
A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (commonly called Treatise when referring to Berkeley's works) is a 1710 work, in English, by Irish Empiricist philosopher George Berkeley.

Whitehall Museum House

WhitehallWhitehall (Rhode Island)
He landed near Newport, Rhode Island, where he bought a plantation at Middletown – the famous "Whitehall".
The Whitehall Museum House is the farmhouse modified by Dean George Berkeley, when he lived in the northern section of Newport, Rhode Island that comprises present-day Middletown in 1729–1731, while working to open his planned St Paul's College on Bermuda.

List of Scholars of Trinity College Dublin

elected a Scholarelected a Foundation Scholarelected a scholar in Economic and Social Studies
He was educated at Kilkenny College and attended Trinity College Dublin, where he was elected a Scholar in 1702, earning a bachelor's degree in 1704 and completing a master's degree in 1707.

Calculus

infinitesimal calculusdifferential and integral calculusclassical calculus
In 1732, he published Alciphron, a Christian apologetic against the free-thinkers, and in 1734, he published The Analyst, a critique of the foundations of calculus, which was influential in the development of mathematics.
In early calculus the use of infinitesimal quantities was thought unrigorous, and was fiercely criticized by a number of authors, most notably Michel Rolle and Bishop Berkeley.

John Locke

LockeLockeanJ Locke
In this book, Berkeley's views were represented by Philonous (Greek: "lover of mind"), while Hylas (Greek: "matter") embodies the Irish thinker's opponents, in particular John Locke.
At the time, the empiricist philosopher's recognition of two types of ideas, simple and complex ideas, more importantly their interaction through associationism inspired other philosophers, such as David Hume and George Berkeley, to revise and expand this theory and apply it to explain how humans gain knowledge in the physical world.

Bishop of Cloyne

Cloynebishopric of Cloyne and RossCloyne and Ross
George Berkeley ( 12 March 1685 – 14 January 1753) – known as Bishop Berkeley (Bishop of Cloyne) – was an Irish philosopher whose primary achievement was the advancement of a theory he called "immaterialism" (later referred to as "subjective idealism" by others).

David Hume

HumeHumeanHume, David
The philosophy of David Hume concerning causality and objectivity is an elaboration of another aspect of Berkeley's philosophy.
Hume's empiricist approach to philosophy places him with John Locke, George Berkeley, Francis Bacon and Thomas Hobbes as a British Empiricist.

Jonathan Swift

SwiftDean SwiftSwiftian
In 1723, following her violent quarrel with Jonathan Swift, who had been her intimate friend for many years, Esther Vanhomrigh (for whom Swift had created the nickname "Vanessa") named Berkeley her co-heir along with the barrister Robert Marshall; her choice of legatees caused a good deal of surprise since she did not know either of them well, although Berkeley as a very young man had known her father.
Swift's benefactor and uncle Godwin Swift took primary responsibility for the young man, sending him with one of his cousins to Kilkenny College (also attended by philosopher George Berkeley).

Dean of Derry

Derry
In 1721/2 he was made Dean of Dromore and, in 1724, Dean of Derry.

René Descartes

DescartesCartesianRene Descartes
In his Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision, Berkeley frequently criticised the views of the Optic Writers, a title that seems to include Molyneux, Wallis, Malebranche and Descartes.
Descartes laid the foundation for 17th-century continental rationalism, later advocated by Spinoza and Leibniz, and was later opposed by the empiricist school of thought consisting of Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume.

Dysart Castle

Berkeley was born at his family home, Dysart Castle, near Thomastown, County Kilkenny, Ireland, the eldest son of William Berkeley, a cadet of the noble family of Berkeley.
It is best known as the childhood home of George Berkeley, the Irish philosopher for whom Berkeley, California and the Trinity College Dublin Berkeley Library is named.

Dean of Dromore

Dean
In 1721/2 he was made Dean of Dromore and, in 1724, Dean of Derry.

The Analyst

ghosts of departed quantitiesanalyst
In 1732, he published Alciphron, a Christian apologetic against the free-thinkers, and in 1734, he published The Analyst, a critique of the foundations of calculus, which was influential in the development of mathematics.
The Analyst, subtitled "''A DISCOURSE Addressed to an Infidel MATHEMATICIAN. WHEREIN It is examined whether the Object, Principles, and Inferences of the modern Analysis are more distinctly conceived, or more evidently deduced, than Religious Mysteries and Points of Faith''", is a book published by George Berkeley in 1734.

Thomastown

Berkeley was born at his family home, Dysart Castle, near Thomastown, County Kilkenny, Ireland, the eldest son of William Berkeley, a cadet of the noble family of Berkeley.
Dysart Castle close to Thomastown is reputed to have been the birthplace of the influential Irish philosopher Bishop George Berkeley.