George Boole

BooleBoole, GeorgeBoole, Gboolean
George Boole (2 November 1815 – 8 December 1864) was a largely self-taught English mathematician, philosopher and logician, most of whose short career was spent as the first professor of mathematics at Queen's College, Cork in Ireland.wikipedia
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The Laws of Thought

Laws of ThoughtAn Investigation of the Laws of ThoughtAn Investigation of the Laws of Thought on Which are Founded the Mathematical Theories of Logic and Probabilities
He worked in the fields of differential equations and algebraic logic, and is best known as the author of The Laws of Thought (1854) which contains Boolean algebra.
An Investigation of the Laws of Thought on Which are Founded the Mathematical Theories of Logic and Probabilities by George Boole, published in 1854, is the second of Boole's two monographs on algebraic logic.

Edward Bromhead

BromheadEdward Ffrench BromheadBromhead, Edward
Edward Bromhead, who knew John Boole through the institution, helped George Boole with mathematics books and he was given the calculus text of Sylvestre François Lacroix by the Rev. George Stevens Dickson of St Swithin's, Lincoln.
Sir Edward Thomas Ffrench Bromhead, 2nd Baronet FRS FRSE (26 March 1789 – 14 March 1855) was a British landowner and mathematician, best remembered as patron of the mathematician and physicist George Green and mentor of George Boole.

Mary Everest Boole

Mary BooleMary EverestBoole, Mary Everest
He met his future wife, Mary Everest, there in 1850 while she was visiting her uncle John Ryall who was Professor of Greek.
Mary Everest Boole (11 March 1832 in Wickwar, Gloucestershire – 17 May 1916 in Middlesex, England) was a self-taught mathematician who is best known as an author of didactic works on mathematics, such as Philosophy and Fun of Algebra, and as the wife of fellow mathematician George Boole.

Waddington, Lincolnshire

Waddington
Four years later he took over Hall's Academy in Waddington, outside Lincoln, following the death of Robert Hall.
Around 1830, George Boole, the mathematician, taught at Waddington Academy Boarding School in the village, run by Robert Hall.

University College Cork

UCCUniversity College, CorkQueen's College, Cork
George Boole (2 November 1815 – 8 December 1864) was a largely self-taught English mathematician, philosopher and logician, most of whose short career was spent as the first professor of mathematics at Queen's College, Cork in Ireland.
This expansion continued with the opening of the Alfred O'Rahilly building in the late 1990s, the Cavanagh Pharmacy building, the Brookfield Health Sciences centre, the extended Áras na MacLéinn (Devere Hall), the Lewis Glucksman Gallery in 2004, Experience UCC (Visitors' Centre) and an extension to the Boole Library – named for the first professor of mathematics at UCC, George Boole, who developed the algebra that would later make computer programming possible.

List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1857

Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 18571857
He was awarded the Keith Medal by the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1855 and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 1857.

Boolean algebra

Boolean logicBooleanBoolean algebra (logic)
He worked in the fields of differential equations and algebraic logic, and is best known as the author of The Laws of Thought (1854) which contains Boolean algebra. A 2003 article provides a systematic comparison and critical evaluation of Aristotelian logic and Boolean logic; it also reveals the centrality of wholistic reference in Boole's philosophy of logic. Boole is the namesake of the branch of algebra known as Boolean algebra, as well as the namesake of the lunar crater Boole.
Boolean algebra was introduced by George Boole in his first book The Mathematical Analysis of Logic (1847), and set forth more fully in his An Investigation of the Laws of Thought (1854).

Lincolnshire

County of LincolnLincolnshire, EnglandLincs.
Boole was born in Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England, the son of John Boole senior (1779–1848), a shoemaker and Mary Ann Joyce.

Greyfriars, Lincoln

Lincoln GreyfriarsGreyfriarsGreyfriars or Mechanics Institute
Boole participated in the Mechanics Institute, in the Greyfriars, Lincoln, which was founded in 1833.
George Boole participated in the Mechanics' Institute.

Edmund Larken

Edmund Roberts Larken
With Edmund Larken and others he set up a building society in 1847.
In 1847 he became chairman of a building society, of which George Boole was a director.

Keith Medal

Keith PrizeKeith Gold Medal
He was awarded the Keith Medal by the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1855 and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 1857.

Lincoln, England

LincolnLincoln, LincolnshireCity of Lincoln Council
Boole was born in Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England, the son of John Boole senior (1779–1848), a shoemaker and Mary Ann Joyce.

Boolean ring

Boolean ringsring
Handling this ambiguity was an early problem of the theory, reflecting the modern use of both Boolean rings and Boolean algebras (which are simply different aspects of one type of structure).
Boolean rings are named after the founder of Boolean algebra, George Boole.

Gottlob Frege

FregeFregeanFrege, Gottlob
Among his many innovations is his principle of wholistic reference, which was later, and probably independently, adopted by Gottlob Frege and by logicians who subscribe to standard first-order logic.
Moreover, until Russell and Whitehead's Principia Mathematica (3 vols.) appeared in 1910–13, the dominant approach to mathematical logic was still that of George Boole (1815–64) and his intellectual descendants, especially Ernst Schröder (1841–1902).

Propositional calculus

propositional logicpropositionalsentential logic
The conception of a Boolean algebra structure on equivalent statements of a propositional calculus is credited to Hugh MacColl (1877), in work surveyed 15 years later by Johnson.
Consequently, many of the advances achieved by Leibniz were recreated by logicians like George Boole and Augustus De Morgan completely independent of Leibniz.

Claude Shannon

Claude E. ShannonShannonClaude Elwood Shannon
Claude Shannon attended a philosophy class at the University of Michigan which introduced him to Boole's studies.
In 1932, Shannon entered the University of Michigan, where he was introduced to the work of George Boole.

Digital electronics

digital circuitdigitaldigital technology
Hence, Boolean algebra became the foundation of practical digital circuit design; and Boole, via Shannon and Shestakov, provided the theoretical grounding for the Information Age.
Digital logic as we know it was the brain-child of George Boole in the mid 19th century.

Ernst Schröder

SchröderErnst SchroderErnst Schroeder
Surveys of these developments were published by Ernst Schröder, Louis Couturat, and Clarence Irving Lewis.
He is a major figure in the history of mathematical logic (a term he may have invented), by virtue of summarizing and extending the work of George Boole, Augustus De Morgan, Hugh MacColl, and especially Charles Peirce.

De Morgan's laws

De Morgan's lawDe Morgan's theoremDe Morgan dual
Boole's initial involvement in logic was prompted by a current debate on quantification, between Sir William Hamilton who supported the theory of "quantification of the predicate", and Boole's supporter Augustus De Morgan who advanced a version of De Morgan duality, as it is now called.
De Morgan's formulation was influenced by algebraization of logic undertaken by George Boole, which later cemented De Morgan's claim to the find.

Augustus De Morgan

De MorganA Budget of ParadoxesDe Morgan, Augustus
Boole's initial involvement in logic was prompted by a current debate on quantification, between Sir William Hamilton who supported the theory of "quantification of the predicate", and Boole's supporter Augustus De Morgan who advanced a version of De Morgan duality, as it is now called.
Doubtless De Morgan was influenced in his logical investigations by Whewell; but other influential contemporaries were Sir William Rowan Hamilton at Dublin, and George Boole at Cork.

Term logic

Aristotelian logicscholastic logictraditional logic
A 2003 article provides a systematic comparison and critical evaluation of Aristotelian logic and Boolean logic; it also reveals the centrality of wholistic reference in Boole's philosophy of logic.
19th-century attempts to algebraize logic, such as the work of Boole (1815–1864) and Venn (1834–1923), typically yielded systems highly influenced by the term-logic tradition.

William Stanley Jevons

JevonsStanley JevonsWilliam Jevons
Boole and Jevons struggled over just this issue in 1863, in the form of the correct evaluation of x + x.
In 1864 Jevons published a Pure Logic; or, the Logic of Quality apart from Quantity, which was based on Boole's system of logic, but freed from what he considered the false mathematical dress of that system.

Ballintemple, Cork

Ballintemple
In late November 1864, Boole walked, in heavy rain, from his home at Lichfield Cottage in Ballintemple to the university, a distance of three miles, and lectured wearing his wet clothes.
George Boole, the mathematician and inventor of Boolean algebra, lived in Ballintemple during the nineteenth century whilst professor at University College Cork.

Boole (crater)

Boole
Boole is the namesake of the branch of algebra known as Boolean algebra, as well as the namesake of the lunar crater Boole.
It is named after George Boole.

Domain of discourse

universe of discoursedomainarea of interest
Now, whatever may be the extent of the field within which all the objects of our discourse are found, that field may properly be termed the universe of discourse.
The concept universe of discourse is generally attributed to Augustus De Morgan (1846) but the name was used for the first time by George Boole (1854) on page 42 of his Laws of Thought.