George Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston

Lord CurzonGeorge CurzonCurzonLord Curzon of KedlestonGeorge Nathaniel CurzonMarquess Curzon of KedlestonThe Marquess Curzon of KedlestonHon. George CurzonGeorge Curzon, 1st Baron Curzon of KedlestonThe Earl Curzon of Kedleston
George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, (11 January 1859–20 March 1925), who was styled as Lord Curzon of Kedleston between 1898 and 1911, and as Earl Curzon of Kedleston between 1911 and 1921, and was known commonly as Lord Curzon, was a British Conservative statesman who served as Viceroy of India from 1899 to 1905, during which time he created the territory of Eastern Bengal and Assam, and as Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs from 1919 to 1924.wikipedia
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Eastern Bengal and Assam

East Bengal and Assam(Lieutenant) Governor DesignateAssamese province
George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, (11 January 1859–20 March 1925), who was styled as Lord Curzon of Kedleston between 1898 and 1911, and as Earl Curzon of Kedleston between 1911 and 1921, and was known commonly as Lord Curzon, was a British Conservative statesman who served as Viceroy of India from 1899 to 1905, during which time he created the territory of Eastern Bengal and Assam, and as Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs from 1919 to 1924.
Lord Curzon, the Viceroy of India, proposed the Partition of Bengal and put it into effect on 16 October 1905.

Alfred Nathaniel Holden Curzon, 4th Baron Scarsdale

Alfred Curzon, 4th Baron ScarsdaleLord Scarsdale
Curzon was the eldest son and the second of the eleven children of Alfred Curzon, 4th Baron Scarsdale (1831–1916), who was the Rector of Kedleston in Derbyshire.
His eldest son was George Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, the Conservative Viceroy of India and British Foreign Secretary.

Lausanne Conference of 1922–23

Conference of LausanneLausanne ConferenceLausanne
Despite his illustrious success as both Viceroy and Foreign Secretary, especially at the recent Conference of Lausanne, in 1923 Curzon was denied the office of Prime Minister.
Lord Curzon, the British Foreign Secretary, was the coordinator of the conference and dominated it.

Wixenford School

WixenfordWixenford Preparatory School
He was educated at Wixenford School, Eton College, and Balliol College, Oxford.
Among the school's first intake of boys, in May 1869, was George Nathaniel Curzon, a future Viceroy of India.

Oxford Union

Oxford Union SocietyUnionOxford
His maiden speech, which was chiefly an attack on home rule and Irish nationalism, was regarded in much the same way as his oratory at the Oxford Union: brilliant and eloquent but also presumptuous and rather too self-assured.
In the debating chamber there are busts of such notables as Roy Jenkins, Edward Heath, Michael Heseltine, George Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston and William Ewart Gladstone.

Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs

Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Foreign AffairsParliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth AffairsUnder-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs
He was Under-Secretary of State for India in 1891–92 and Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs in 1895–98.
Notable holders of the office include Granville Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Granville, John Wodehouse, 1st Earl of Kimberley, Edward Grey, 1st Viscount Grey of Fallodon, George Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, and Anthony Eden.

Cecil Spring Rice

Sir Cecil Spring RiceCecil Arthur Spring Rice His Excellency The Right Honourable '''Sir Cecil Arthur Spring Rice
He was educated at Eton and at Balliol College, Oxford, at both of which he was a contemporary and close friend of George Nathaniel Curzon, and at the latter of which he studied under the direction of Benjamin Jowett.

J. C. C. Davidson

John DavidsonJ. C. C. Davidson, 1st Viscount DavidsonSir J. C. C. Davidson
This was partly because Curzon was a member of the House of Lords, and partly because Lord Davidson—to whom Baldwin was loyal—and Sir Charles Waterhouse falsely claimed to Lord Stamfordham that the resigned Prime Minister Bonar Law had recommended that George V appoint Baldwin, not Curzon, as his successor.
Stanley Baldwin was chosen to succeed Bonar Law as Prime Minister over the claims of Lord Curzon.

Southport (UK Parliament constituency)

SouthportSouthport Parliamentary constituencySouthport BC
Curzon became Assistant Private Secretary to Salisbury in 1885, and in 1886 entered Parliament as Member for Southport in south-west Lancashire.
In the 19th century a notable representative was George Nathaniel Curzon, future Viceroy of India.

Royal Geographical Society

FRGSInstitute of British GeographersRoyal Geographic Society
A bold and compulsive traveler, fascinated by oriental life and geography, he was awarded the Patron's Gold Medal of the Royal Geographical Society for his exploration of the source of the Amu Darya (Oxus).
A new impetus was given to the Society's affairs in 1911, with the election of Earl Curzon, the former Viceroy of India, as the Society's President (1911–1914).

Mary Curzon, Baroness Curzon of Kedleston

Lady CurzonMary CurzonMary Victoria Leiter
In 1895 he married Mary Victoria Leiter, the daughter of Levi Ziegler Leiter, an American millionaire of German Mennonite origin and co-founder of the Chicago department store Field & Leiter (later Marshall Field).
Mary Victoria Curzon, Baroness Curzon of Kedleston, CI (née Leiter; 27 May 1870 – 18 July 1906) was a British peeress of American background who was Vicereine of India, as the wife of Lord Curzon of Kedleston, Viceroy of India.

Trans-Caspian railway

Transcaspian RailwayCentral Asian Military railwayCentral Asian Railway
In 1879 Russia had begun construction of the Transcaspian Railroad along the Silk Road, officially solely to enforce local control.
However, when Lord Curzon visited the railway, he remarked that he considered its significance went beyond local military control and threatened British interests in Asia.

Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs

Foreign SecretarySecretary of State for Foreign AffairsBritish Foreign Secretary
George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, (11 January 1859–20 March 1925), who was styled as Lord Curzon of Kedleston between 1898 and 1911, and as Earl Curzon of Kedleston between 1911 and 1921, and was known commonly as Lord Curzon, was a British Conservative statesman who served as Viceroy of India from 1899 to 1905, during which time he created the territory of Eastern Bengal and Assam, and as Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs from 1919 to 1924.

Oscar Browning

Mr O. Browning
At Eton, he was a favourite of Oscar Browning, an over-intimate relationship that led to his tutor's dismissal.
The boy was George Nathaniel Curzon, the future Conservative statesman and Viceroy of India.

Under-Secretary of State for India

Permanent Under-Secretary of State for IndiaUnder-Secretary of State for India and BurmaParliamentary Secretary for India and Burma
He was Under-Secretary of State for India in 1891–92 and Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs in 1895–98.

Kedleston Hall

KedlestonCurzonCurzon family
He was born at Kedleston Hall, built on the site where his family, who were of Norman ancestry, had lived since the 12th century.
Also displayed in the house are many curiosities pertaining to George, Lord Curzon of Kedleston, who succeeded to the house in 1916 and who had earlier served as Viceroy of India from 1899 to 1905.

Grace Curzon, Marchioness Curzon of Kedleston

GraceGrace Elvina, Marchioness Curzon of KedlestonGrace Curzon
Mosley exercised a strange fascination for the Curzon women: Irene had a brief romance with him before either were married; Baba became his mistress; and Curzon's second wife, Grace, had a long affair with him.
Grace Elvina Curzon, Marchioness Curzon of Kedleston, GBE (née Trillia Hinds; 16 May 1885 – 29 June 1958) was a United States-born British marchioness and the second wife of George Curzon, British parliamentarian, cabinet minister, and former Viceroy of India.

Baron Ravensdale

Barony of RavensdaleBaroness '''Ravensdale''', ''of Ravensdale in the County of DerbyBaroness Ravensdale
They had three daughters during a firm and happy marriage: Mary Irene, who inherited her father's Barony of Ravensdale and was created a life peer in her own right; Cynthia, who became the first wife of the fascist politician Sir Oswald Mosley; and Alexandra Naldera ("Baba"), who married Edward "Fruity" Metcalfe, the best friend, best man and equerry of Edward VIII.
The title was created on 2 November 1911 for the Conservative politician George Curzon, 1st Baron Curzon, with remainder, in default of issue male, to his eldest daughter and the heirs male of her body, failing whom to his other daughters in like manner in order of primogeniture.

John William Mackail

J. W. MackailMackailMackail, J. W.
At Oxford, Mackail contributed, alongside Cecil Spring Rice, to the composition of a famous sardonic doggerel about George Nathaniel Curzon, later Lord Curzon, their contemporary at Balliol, that was published in The Balliol Masque.

Oswald Mosley

Sir Oswald MosleyMosleyiteSir Oswald Mosley, 6th Baronet
They had three daughters during a firm and happy marriage: Mary Irene, who inherited her father's Barony of Ravensdale and was created a life peer in her own right; Cynthia, who became the first wife of the fascist politician Sir Oswald Mosley; and Alexandra Naldera ("Baba"), who married Edward "Fruity" Metcalfe, the best friend, best man and equerry of Edward VIII.
On 11 May 1920, he married Lady Cynthia "Cimmie" Curzon (1898–1933), second daughter of the 1st Earl Curzon of Kedleston, (1859–1925), Viceroy of India, 1899–1905, Foreign Secretary, 1919–1924, and Lord Curzon's first wife, the U.S. mercantile heiress, the former Mary Leiter.

Peerage of Ireland

Irish peerageIrish peerIreland
He was created a Peer of Ireland as Baron Curzon of Kedleston, in the County of Derby, on his appointment.
The last two grants of Irish peerages were: the promotion of the Marquess of Abercorn (a peerage of Great Britain) to be Duke of Abercorn in the Irish Peerage when he became Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland in 1868 and the granting of the Curzon of Kedleston barony to George Curzon when he became Viceroy of India in 1898.

British expedition to Tibet

Younghusband ExpeditionBritish invasion of Tibet1904 invasion of Tibet
At the end of 1903, Curzon sent a British expedition to Tibet under Francis Younghusband, ostensibly to forestall a Russian advance.
The expedition was intended to counter Russia's perceived ambitions in the East and was initiated largely by Lord Curzon, the head of the British India government.

Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener

Lord KitchenerKitchenerHerbert Kitchener
It often involved petty issues that had much to do with clashes of personality: Curzon once wrote on a document "I rise from the perusal of these papers filled with the sense of the ineptitude of my military advisers", and once wrote to the Commander-in-Chief in India, Kitchener, advising him that signing himself "Kitchener of Khartoum" took up too much time and space, which Kitchener thought petty (Curzon simply signed himself "Curzon" as if he were a hereditary peer, although he later took to signing himself "Curzon of Kedleston").
His term as Commander-in-Chief (1902–09) of the Army in India saw him quarrel with another eminent proconsul, the Viceroy Lord Curzon, who eventually resigned.

Lady Cynthia Mosley

Cynthia MosleyLady CynthiaCynthia
They had three daughters during a firm and happy marriage: Mary Irene, who inherited her father's Barony of Ravensdale and was created a life peer in her own right; Cynthia, who became the first wife of the fascist politician Sir Oswald Mosley; and Alexandra Naldera ("Baba"), who married Edward "Fruity" Metcalfe, the best friend, best man and equerry of Edward VIII.
Born Cynthia Blanche Curzon at Kedleston Hall, she was the second daughter of Hon. George Curzon (later Marquess Curzon of Kedleston) and his first wife, Mary Victoria Leiter, an American department-store heiress.