George Hibbert

HibbertGeorge
George Hibbert (13 January 1757 – 8 October 1837) was an eminent English merchant, politician, slave- and ship-owner, amateur botanist and book collector.wikipedia
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Royal National Lifeboat Institution

RNLINational Institution for the Preservation of Life from ShipwreckRoyal National Lifeboat Institute
He also helped found the Royal National Lifeboat Institution in 1824. As a shipowner and chairman of the West Indies Merchants, Hibbert associated with philanthropist Sir William Hillary and Thomas Wilson, Liberal MP for Southwark, to help found the National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck – an institution better known today as the Royal National Lifeboat Institution – on 4 March 1824.
However, on appealing to the more philanthropic members of London society, the plans were adopted and, with the help of Member of Parliament Thomas Wilson and former MP and merchant George Hibbert, the National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck was founded in 1824.

West India Docks

West India Dock CompanyWest India DockBlackwall Basin
With Robert Milligan, he was also one of the principals of the West India Dock Company which instigated the construction of the West India Docks on London's Isle of Dogs in 1800.
Outraged at losses due to theft and delay at London's riverside wharves, Milligan headed a group of powerful businessmen, including the chairman of the London Society of West India Planters and Merchants, George Hibbert, who promoted the creation of a wet dock circled by a high wall.

Robert Milligan

With Robert Milligan, he was also one of the principals of the West India Dock Company which instigated the construction of the West India Docks on London's Isle of Dogs in 1800.
The Docks' foundation stone was laid in July 1800, when Milligan was Deputy Chairman of the West India Dock Company – his strong connections with the political establishment of the day were evident from those attending the ceremony, the stone being laid by Lord Chancellor Lord Loughborough and Prime Minister William Pitt the Younger as well as Company chairman George Hibbert and himself.

Thomas Hibbert

The Hibbert estates run by his uncle Thomas Hibbert were in Agualta Vale, Jamaica, including Hibbert House (currently the headquarters of the Jamaica National Heritage Trust); another uncle, John, had also settled in Jamaica.
Born into a family owning cotton mills which supplied barter goods to businesses in the slave-trade, Thomas was the first of the Hibbert family to settle in Jamaica, arriving in 1734 (his youngest brother, John (1732-1769), also lived in Jamaica, from 1754 until his death; his other brother, Robert, was father of Thomas, a co-founder of the family trading business Hibbert, Purrier and Horton, and of George, merchant and pro-slavery campaigner).

London Tavern

Shortly after William Wilberforce first raised the abolition of slavery in Parliament in May 1789, Hibbert spoke at a meeting of merchants at the London Tavern, seeking to demolish Wilberforce's speech with a 40-minute address entitled 'The Slave Trade Indispensable...'.

Hibbert, Purrier and Horton

Around 1780 he went to London to join the West India trading house of Hibbert, Purrier and Horton (later Hibberts, Fuhr and Purrier) at 9 Mincing Lane.
His brother, a third generation Robert Hibbert (1750–1835) also joined the partnership, as did, in 1780, George Hibbert (1757–1837) who eventually rose to head the firm, which had offices at 9 Mincing Lane.

Joseph Knight (horticulturist)

Joseph KnightKnightJoseph Knight (gardener)
Hibbert's gardener, Joseph Knight, was reputedly one of the first people to propagate Proteaceae in England; the genus Hibbertia is named after Hibbert.
Joseph Knight (7 October 1778 – 20 July 1855), gardener to George Hibbert, was one of the first people in England to successfully propagate Proteaceae.

Robert Hibbert (1717–1784)

Robert HibbertRobertRobert Hibbert (1717-1784)
George Hibbert was born in Stockfield Hall, Manchester, the son of Robert Hibbert and Abigail Hibbert (née Scholey).
Robert married Abigail Scholey, with whom he had nine children: Anne Hibbert, Elizabeth Hibbert, John Hibbert (died 1770), Margaret Hibbert, Samuel Hibbert (died 1746), Thomas Hibbert (1744–1819; co-founder of family trading partnership, Hibbert, Purrier and Horton), Robert Hibbert (1750–1835), George Hibbert (1757–1837) and William Hibbert (1759–1844).

James Main (botanist)

James Main
Another of Hibbert's employees, James Main, was despatched to China to collect for him.
Main's botanical career began when he was employed by George Hibbert, who despatched him to China to collect plants.

Seaford (UK Parliament constituency)

SeafordSeaford (seat 1/2)Seaford constituency
He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Seaford from 31 October 1806 until 5 October 1812.

Hibbertia

Guinea flower
Hibbert's gardener, Joseph Knight, was reputedly one of the first people to propagate Proteaceae in England; the genus Hibbertia is named after Hibbert.
The genus takes its name from George Hibbert (1757 - 1837), an eminent English merchant and amateur botanist.

London Institution

The London Institution
A respected botanist and bibliophile, he was a founder of the London Institution in 1805 (vice-president in 1806) and elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1811.

Agent-general

Agent-General for Western AustraliaAgent GeneralAgent-General for Victoria
In 1812 George Hibbert was appointed agent-general for Jamaica at an annual salary of £1,500, a position he held until retiring in 1831.

Philip Fonnereau

In 1784, Hibbert married Elizabeth Margaret, the daughter of Philip Fonnereau, MP, a prominent Huguenot merchant and a director of the Bank of England; they had five sons and nine daughters.

Clapham

Clapham, LondonareaClapham Green
Hibbert lived for some years London, dividing his time between a house in Portland Place and another, The Hollies, on the north side of Clapham Common in Clapham in south-west London, where he accumulated a considerable collection of books, including Gutenberg's Bible on paper (now at New York), the 1459 Psalter on vellum (now at The Hague) and the Complutensian polyglot, also on vellum (now at Chantilly).
By contrast, an opponent of Wilberforce, merchant and slave-trader George Hibbert also lived at Clapham Common, worshipping in the same church, Holy Trinity.

William Hillary

Sir William Hillary
As a shipowner and chairman of the West Indies Merchants, Hibbert associated with philanthropist Sir William Hillary and Thomas Wilson, Liberal MP for Southwark, to help found the National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck – an institution better known today as the Royal National Lifeboat Institution – on 4 March 1824.
He appealed to London philanthropists including Thomas Wilson (MP for the ) and George Hibbert of the West Indies merchants, and his plans were adopted.

Metropolitan Borough of Poplar

PoplarPoplar Borough CouncilPoplar District
It became an emblem of the West India Docks and formed part of the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Poplar.
The top shield was the seal of Poplar Vestry, and showed the 'Hibbert Gate' of the old West India Docks, with a sailing ship on top of the shield.

Slavery

slaveslavesenslaved
George Hibbert (13 January 1757 – 8 October 1837) was an eminent English merchant, politician, slave- and ship-owner, amateur botanist and book collector.

Isle of Dogs

CrossharbourIsle of Dogs, Londonthe Isle of Dogs
With Robert Milligan, he was also one of the principals of the West India Dock Company which instigated the construction of the West India Docks on London's Isle of Dogs in 1800.

Sugar plantations in the Caribbean

plantationplantationssugar plantation
Hibbert came from a family made rich from cultivating multiple sugar plantations in the West Indies.

Jamaica

JAMJamaicanJamaica, West Indies
The Hibbert estates run by his uncle Thomas Hibbert were in Agualta Vale, Jamaica, including Hibbert House (currently the headquarters of the Jamaica National Heritage Trust); another uncle, John, had also settled in Jamaica.

Hibbert House

Headquarters HouseHibbert
The Hibbert estates run by his uncle Thomas Hibbert were in Agualta Vale, Jamaica, including Hibbert House (currently the headquarters of the Jamaica National Heritage Trust); another uncle, John, had also settled in Jamaica.

Jamaica National Heritage Trust

The Hibbert estates run by his uncle Thomas Hibbert were in Agualta Vale, Jamaica, including Hibbert House (currently the headquarters of the Jamaica National Heritage Trust); another uncle, John, had also settled in Jamaica.

Mincing Lane

Mincing Lane, LondonMinster Court
Around 1780 he went to London to join the West India trading house of Hibbert, Purrier and Horton (later Hibberts, Fuhr and Purrier) at 9 Mincing Lane.

Court of Aldermen

AldermanAlderman of the City of LondonAlderman of London
Hibbert was an Alderman of London from 1798 to 1803.