George III of the United Kingdom

George IIIKing George IIIKing GeorgeKingGeorg IIIthe KingGeorgePrince of WalesGeorge III of Great BritainKing George III of the United Kingdom
George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820.wikipedia
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Regency era

RegencyRegency period1820
After a final relapse in 1810, a regency was established, and George III's eldest son, George, Prince of Wales, ruled as Prince Regent.
The Regency in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a period when King George III was deemed unfit to rule and his son ruled as his proxy as Prince Regent.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United KingdomBritishUK
George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820.
However, King George III was bitterly opposed to any such Emancipation and succeeded in defeating his government's attempts to introduce it.

Frederick, Prince of Wales

FrederickPrince of WalesPrince Frederick
He was the grandson of King George II, and the eldest son of Frederick, Prince of Wales, and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha.
He was the eldest but estranged son of King George II and Caroline of Ansbach, and the father of King George III.

Prince regent

Prince-RegentregentRegent of Belgium
After a final relapse in 1810, a regency was established, and George III's eldest son, George, Prince of Wales, ruled as Prince Regent.
In the English language the title Prince Regent is most commonly associated with George IV, who held the style HRH The Prince Regent during the incapacity, by dint of mental illness, of his father, George III (see Regent for other regents).

Prince Edward, Duke of York and Albany

Duke of YorkPrince EdwardDuke of York and Albany
The family moved to Leicester Square, where George and his younger brother Prince Edward, Duke of York and Albany, were educated together by private tutors.
Prince Edward, Duke of York and Albany, (Edward Augustus; 25 March 1739 – 17 September 1767) was the younger brother of George III of the United Kingdom and the second son of Frederick, Prince of Wales, and Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha.

Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha

AugustaPrincess AugustaAugusta, Dowager Princess of Wales
He was the grandson of King George II, and the eldest son of Frederick, Prince of Wales, and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha.
She was one of only four Princesses of Wales who never became queen consort as her eldest son succeeded her father-in-law as George III of the United Kingdom in 1760 rather than her spouse, who had died nine years earlier.

King of Hanover

HanoverKing
He was concurrently Duke and prince-elector of Brunswick-Lüneburg ("Hanover") in the Holy Roman Empire before becoming King of Hanover on 12 October 1814.
The King of Hanover (German: König von Hannover) was the official title of the head of state and hereditary ruler of the Kingdom of Hanover, beginning with the proclamation of the King of the United Kingdom George III, as "King of Hanover" during the Congress of Vienna, on 12 October 1814 at Vienna, and ending with the kingdom's annexation by Prussia on 20 September 1866.

George II of Great Britain

George IIKing George IIPrince of Wales
He was the grandson of King George II, and the eldest son of Frederick, Prince of Wales, and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha.
Frederick died unexpectedly in 1751, nine years before his father, so George II was ultimately succeeded by his grandson, George III.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican RevolutionAmerican War of Independence
However, many of Britain's American colonies were soon lost in the American War of Independence.
King George then issued a Proclamation of Rebellion on August 23, 1775, which only served to embolden the colonists in their determination to become independent.

Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Queen CharlotteCharlottethe Queen
On 8 September 1761 in the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace, the King married Princess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, whom he met on their wedding day.
Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (Sophia Charlotte; 19 May 1744 – 17 November 1818) was the wife of King George III.

John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute

Lord ButeEarl of ButeThe Earl of Bute
In the spring of 1756, as George approached his eighteenth birthday, the King offered him a grand establishment at St James's Palace, but George refused the offer, guided by his mother and her confidant, Lord Bute, who would later serve as Prime Minister.
John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute, (25 May 1713 – 10 March 1792) was a British nobleman who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1762 to 1763 under George III.

Church of England

AnglicanChurchC of E
His religious education was wholly Anglican.
Papal recognition of George III in 1766 led to greater religious tolerance.

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Housethe Palace Buckingham House
In 1762, George purchased Buckingham House (on the site now occupied by Buckingham Palace) for use as a family retreat.
It was acquired by King George III in 1761 as a private residence for Queen Charlotte and became known as The Queen's House.

House of Hanover

HanoverianHanoverHanoverians
He was the third British monarch of the House of Hanover, but unlike his two predecessors, he was born in Great Britain, spoke English as his first language, and never visited Hanover.
George III (r. 1760–1820)

Royal Academy of Arts

Royal AcademyRARoyal Academy Schools
He aided the Royal Academy of Arts with large grants from his private funds, and may have donated more than half of his personal income to charity.
The Royal Academy of Arts was founded through a personal act of King George III on 10 December 1768 with a mission to promote the arts of design in Britain through education and exhibition.

Crown land

crown landsroyal demesneroyal domain
On his accession, the Crown lands produced relatively little income; most revenue was generated through taxes and excise duties.
In Britain, the hereditary revenues of Crown lands provided income for the monarch until the start of the reign of George III, when the profits from the Crown Estate were surrendered to the Parliament of Great Britain in return for a fixed civil list payment.

Whigs (British political party)

WhigWhigsWhig Party
George was also perceived as favouring Tory ministers, which led to his denunciation by the Whigs as an autocrat.
The Whigs took full control of the government in 1715 and remained totally dominant until King George III, coming to the throne in 1760, allowed Tories back in. The Whig Supremacy (1715–1760) was enabled by the Hanoverian succession of George I in 1714 and the failed Jacobite rising of 1715 by Tory rebels.

Windsor Castle

WindsorCastle Windsor Castle's Brunswick Tower
His other residences were Kew and Windsor Castle.
After a period of neglect during the 18th century, George III and George IV renovated and rebuilt Charles II's palace at colossal expense, producing the current design of the State Apartments, full of Rococo, Gothic and Baroque furnishings.

King's Library

Bib. Reg.Enlightenment GalleryKing's Library Tower
The King's Library was open and available to scholars and was the foundation of a new national library.
Assembled by George III, this scholarly library of over 65,000 volumes was subsequently given to the British nation by George IV.

Crown Estate

Crownroyal manorThe Crown Estate
George surrendered the Crown Estate to Parliamentary control in return for a civil list annuity for the support of his household and the expenses of civil government.
However, in 1760, George III surrendered control over the Estate's revenues to the Treasury, thus relieving him of the responsibility of paying for the costs of the civil service, defence costs, the national debt, and his own personal debts.

Royal Proclamation of 1763

Royal ProclamationProclamation of 1763Proclamation Line
Later that year, the Royal Proclamation of 1763 placed a limit upon the westward expansion of the American colonies.
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was issued on October 7, 1763, by King George III following Great Britain's acquisition of French territory in North America after the end of the French and Indian War/Seven Years' War.

List of British monarchs

MonarchMonarchsKing
George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820.
| George III

Canaletto

Giovanni Antonio CanalAntonio CanaleAntonio Canaletto
Of his art collection, the two most notable purchases are Johannes Vermeer's Lady at the Virginals and a set of Canalettos, but it is as a collector of books that he is best remembered.
He was highly successful in England, thanks to the British merchant and connoisseur Joseph Smith, whose large collection of Canaletto's works was sold to King George III in 1762.

Lady Sarah Lennox

Lady Sarah Bunburynotorious royal consortSarah Lennox
In 1759, George was smitten with Lady Sarah Lennox, sister of the Duke of Richmond, but Lord Bute advised against the match and George abandoned his thoughts of marriage.
Having been a favourite of King George II since her childhood, she was invited to appear at court and there caught the eye of George, Prince of Wales (the future King George III), whom she had met as a child.

Leicester Square

Leicester HouseLeicester FieldsLeicester
The family moved to Leicester Square, where George and his younger brother Prince Edward, Duke of York and Albany, were educated together by private tutors.
A statue of King George I was built on the square in 1760 following the coronation of his grandson, George III.